2

I am currently trying to figure out if CouchDB is suitable for my use-case and if so, how. I have a situation similar to the following:

First set of documents (let's call them companies):

{
    "_id" : 1,
    "name" : "Foo"
}

{
    "_id" : 2,
    "name" : "Bar"
}

{
    "_id" : 3,
    "name" : "Baz"
}

Second set of documents (let's call them projects):

{
    "_id" : 4,
    "name" : "FooProject1",
    "company" : 1
}

{
    "_id" : 5,
    "name" : "FooProject2",
    "company" : 1
}
...
{
    "_id" : 100,
    "name" : "BazProject2",
    "company" : 3
}    

Third set of documents (let's call them incidents):

{
   "_id" : "300",
   "project" : 4,
   "description" : "...",
   "cost" : 200
}

{
   "_id" : "301",
   "project" : 4,
   "description" : "...",
   "cost" : 400
}

{
   "_id" : "302",
   "project" : 4,
   "description" : "...",
   "cost" : 500
}
   ...

So in short every company has multiple projects, and every project can have multiple incidents. One reason I model the data is, that I come mainly from a SQL background, so the modelling may be completely unsuitable. The second reason is, that I would like to add new incidents very easily by just using the REST-API provided by couchdb. So the incidents have to be single documents.

However, I now would like to get a view that would allow me to calculate the total cost for each company. I can easily define a view using map-reduce and linked documents which get's me the total amount per project. However once I am at the project level I cannot get any further to the level of the company.

Is this possible at all using couchDb? This kind of summarising data sounds like a perfect use case for map-reduce. In SQL I would just do a three-table join, but it seems like in couchDb the best I can get is two-table joins.

  • You cannot (or at least should not) do any joins in CouchDB. You can use list functions to merge adjacent rows (collation), but anything else will destroy your performance. – OrangeDog May 27 '16 at 15:44
2

As mentioned you cannot do joins in CouchDb but this isn't a limitation, this is an invitation to both think about your problems and approach them differently. The correct way to do this in CouchDb is to define data structures called for example : IncidentReference composed of :

  • The project id
  • And the company id

That way your data would look like :

{
   "_id" : "301",
   "project" : 4,
   "description" : "...",
   "cost" : 400,
   "reference" : {
         "projectId" : 1,
         "companyId" : 2
   }
}

This is just fine. Once you have that, you can play with Map/Reduce to achieve whatever you want easily. Generally speaking, you need to think about the way you are going to query your data.

  • So as far as I understand this, from an SQL point of view you have to really let go of any kind of normalization? Because with this incidentReference I now have the projectId and the companyId both stored in the the reference, although the project already contains the company (duplicated data). So what is the best way to keep this data from becoming inconsistent? – LiKao May 30 '16 at 8:09
  • 1
    You'll still need to be careful about denormalization generally speaking, for example, if you denormalize the customer name, and this name changes, this becomes difficult to manage. However, it is usually safe to have as much references (identifiers) to other entities as you need. If you think about it, it is extremely rare that these references become outdated (how can an incident no longer belong to this project ? Or to this company). Just make sure that these references participate in defining the identity of your document, an identity doesn't change :) – tobiak777 May 30 '16 at 8:18

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