3

Let me preface this by saying that I am fairly new to Python and I apologize if this is not the appropriate place for this question.

I am using the psycopg2 module to manipulate a PostgreSQL database. The general usage would look something like this:

# Example 1

import psycopg2

conn = psycopg2.connect(database="mydb", user="postgres")
cur = conn.cursor()

cur.execute ("SELECT * FROM mytable;")
rows = cur.fetchall()
for i, row in enumerate(rows):
    print "Row", i, "value = ", row

cur.close()
conn.close()

This will open a connection to the mydb database, select all fields from the table mytable and print them, and then close the connection.

What I would like to do is factor out some of these functions into a module because I will need to call them over and over throughout many scripts. For this example, ideally I would have a module named core which contains three functions:

  • core.db_init() - which opens the connection and consists of the first two lines of code above.
  • core.db_query(query) - which performs the desired SQL query and consists of the third line in the above code.
  • core.db_close() - which closes the connection and consists of the last two lines.

I have tried creating a module as follows:

# Module core.py

import psycopg2

def db_init():
    conn = psycopg2.connect(database="mydb", user="postgres")
    cur = conn.cursor()

def db_query(query):
    cur.execute(query)

def db_close():
    cur.close()
    conn.close()

But I get namespace errors when I try to recreate Example 1 using this module:

# Example 2

import core

core.db_init()
core.db_query("SELECT * FROM mytable;")

rows = cur.fetchall()
for i, row in enumerate(rows):
    print "Row", i, "value = ", row    

core.db_close()

I'm not even sure a module is actually what I want. Should I be using a class instead? Again, I'm very new to all of this. But if someone could help me figure out a better way to do this, I would be very grateful.

  • 1
    Well written question btw, has everything you've tried, what your desired behavior would be and roughly an actual error. Also welcome to StackOverflow and especially welcome to Python : ) If any of the answers given below solves your need don't forget to mark the question as "Answered" so it doesn't end up in the pile of unanswered questions. – Torxed May 27 '16 at 17:03
7

Your main issue, is that each variable is limited to the function you wrote it in.
Unless otherwise declared like such:

def db_init():
    global conn
    conn = psycopg2....

A better approach would be to convert this into a class, a basic example would be:

import psycopg2

class MyDatabase():
    def __init__(self, db="mydb", user="postgres"):
        self.conn = psycopg2.connect(database=db, user=user)
        self.cur = self.conn.cursor()

    def query(self, query):
        self.cur.execute(query)

    def close(self):
        self.cur.close()
        self.conn.close()

db = MyDatabase()
db.query("SELECT * FROM table;")
db.close()

Now, the SELECT query won't do much since you're using cur.execute().
But i kept this on purpose to keep the code similar to what you wrote, you'll want to swap that out to return the values however if calling a query that is expected to return a value and so on.

Your approach that is focused on functions will have "namespace" issues where variables live in a local scope of that function and there for other functions can't normally access them.

Instead, class scoped variables can access its own variables and is there for not as limited out of the box.

You could make global variables and declare them as global in the functions, but I think as I mentioned in a comment:

You'd want to make this into a class. A database is a session based entity just as classes are session entities. Handle each connection as a living entity by class-abstracting it, otherwise cur and conn will become scoped variables and you need to work them into the global scope.

  • 1
    Thank you so much! I ended up using your class approach nearly verbatim. I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my question, even if it was fairly noobish. Thank you for the warm welcome :) – fattybake May 27 '16 at 17:57
  • @fattybake you're welcome and the pleasure is mine. Friendly people like you make it worth the while to spend an extra minute on the answers given :) keep it up and good luck on your endeavors! – Torxed May 27 '16 at 18:00
1

You could do it the way you want to - although I would consider using sqlalchemy or other module to handle those parts for you.

The code you pasted doesn't work because cursor is not defined in your other methods.

Consider doing it in one call - for example:

# Module core.py

import psycopg2

def execute_query(query):
    conn = psycopg2.connect(database="mydb", user="postgres")
    cur = conn.cursor()
    results = cur.execute(query)
    cur.close()
    conn.close()
    return results

Note that this is not optimal and if you are doing a lot of small queries killing connection for each one is not the best idea.

  • Thanks for this answer! I appreciate that you tried to keep it as similar to my method as possible. You're definitely right about it being suboptimal because it would open and close the connection every time I try to do anything. I ended up going with Torxed's solution because it was what I was trying to do, even though I didn't know exactly what I needed. – fattybake May 27 '16 at 17:56

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