43

Is there a way to do what this code did in EF Core RC 2?

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{    
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
}
103

There is no convention for this as of EF RC2 build. This is from EF Core team:

In past pre-release of EF Core, the table name for an entity was the same as the entity class name. In RC2 we now use the name of the DbSet property. If no DbSet property is defined for the given entity type, then the entity class name is used.


Now if you want to revert back to the RC1 naming conventions for tables, you have 3 ways to go with:


1. Choosing Singular Names for DbSet Properties:

One way is to singularize your DbSet property names (which I don't like). Say for example you have a Book entity and you want to map to a Book table:

public DbSet<Book> Book { get; set; }


2. Using ToTable() Fluent API:

You can of course always use fluent API to override any convention in place and dictate the table name to whatever you want:

modelBuilder.Entity<Book>().ToTable("Book");


3. Writing a Custom Convention:

Just because EF Core RC2 does not have a convention for this, it doesn't mean we can't write our own. To do so, first we need to create an extension method on ModelBuilder object:

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Metadata.Internal;

public static class ModelBuilderExtensions 
{
    public static void RemovePluralizingTableNameConvention(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (IMutableEntityType entity in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
        {
            entity.Relational().TableName = entity.DisplayName();
        }
    }
}

And then we simply call it from the OnModelCreating method on our DbContext object:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.RemovePluralizingTableNameConvention();
}


On Closing:

I don't like plural table names and I like the last option better than the others and went with that. That said, it's my personal opinion and other developers might find any of these 3 ways more favorable than the others and choose to go with that :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you Morteza. I think that for now I'll just set the table name on the entity. – Paul Speranza May 28 '16 at 20:10
  • I also added your way to my answer so that we have them all in one place as a point of reference for other fellow developers. Thanks. – Morteza Manavi May 28 '16 at 23:48
  • 2
    @Tančev Saša I tried to call modelBuilder.RemovePluralizingTableNameConvention(); before base.OnModelCreating(builder); and identity tables have OK names – zholinho Oct 24 '17 at 8:58
  • 1
    IMutableEntityType doesnt have Relational() method, is it changed? – Dheeraj Kumar Nov 30 '18 at 13:16
  • 3
    entity.Relational().TableName = entity.DisplayName(); not work in .net core 3 – Hamed Hajiloo Nov 30 '19 at 7:06
40

For EF Core 3.0, use this to set the TableName property (because entity.Relational() no longer exist):

public static class ModelBuilderExtensions 
{
    public static void RemovePluralizingTableNameConvention(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (IMutableEntityType entity in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
        {
            entity.SetTableName(entity.DisplayName());
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • If you use this method with an inherited entity, you'll get the error ...Only base type entity types can be mapped to a table.. To work around this, I used the condition if (entity.BaseType == null). Base classes will return null while inherited classes will obviously return the base type. – Kramb Jun 19 at 18:50
9

The EF Core version doesn't seem to support entity.DisplayName. This is a working alternative:

foreach (var entityType in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
{
    // Skip shadow types
    if (entityType.ClrType == null)
        continue;

    entityType.Relational().TableName = entityType.ClrType.Name;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    entity.DisplayName is an extension method in the Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Metadata.Internal namespace (which is actually public, not internal). – hgcummings Jun 12 '18 at 14:50
3

This is also an option:

 using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema;

 [Table("Book")]
 public class Book
 {...}

although you need to annotate it on each entity

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2

In Entity Framework NET core v2 you can choose to pluralize or singularize DbSets and Collections with a hook.

public class MyDesignTimeServices : IDesignTimeServices
{
    public void ConfigureDesignTimeServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddSingleton<IPluralizer, MyPluralizer>();
    }
}

public class MyPluralizer : IPluralizer
{
    public string Pluralize(string name)
    {
        return Inflector.Inflector.Pluralize(name) ?? name;
    }

    public string Singularize(string name)
    {
        return Inflector.Inflector.Singularize(name) ?? name;
    }
}

See this answer for more information: https://stackoverflow.com/a/47410837/869033

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0

I use this for EF Core 3.1 to preserve [Table("some_table_name")] annotation on entity types, although ConventionAnnotation is an internal class.

static class UseEntityTypeNameForTableNameExtension
{
    public static void UseEntityTypeNameForTableName(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (var entity in modelBuilder.Model.GetEntityTypes())
        {
            var tableNameAnnotation = (ConventionAnnotation)entity.FindAnnotation(RelationalAnnotationNames.TableName);
#pragma warning disable EF1001
            var configurationSource = tableNameAnnotation.GetConfigurationSource();
#pragma warning restore EF1001
            if (configurationSource != ConfigurationSource.Convention)
            {
                // Set explicitly using Fluent API or has TableAttribute DataAnnotation
                continue;
            }
            var defaultTableName = entity.GetDefaultTableName();
            entity.SetTableName(defaultTableName);
        }
    }
}
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0

I went with adding a virtual

public virtual DbSet<TableName> TableName{ get; set; }
public DbSet<TableName> TableNames { get; set; }

TableNames.FirstOrDefault();
| improve this answer | |

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