25

I need to do the equivalent of the following C# code in C++

Array.Resize(ref A, A.Length - 1);

How to achieve this in C++?

1
  • 6
    Is there any reason why you don't use std::vector? – Liton Sep 20 '10 at 8:17
41

The size of an array is static in C++. You cannot dynamically resize it. That's what std::vector is for:

std::vector<int> v; // size of the vector starts at 0

v.push_back(10); // v now has 1 element
v.push_back(20); // v now has 2 elements
v.push_back(30); // v now has 3 elements

v.pop_back(); // removes the 30 and resizes v to 2

v.resize(v.size() - 1); // resizes v to 1
3
  • 1
    BTW, isn't array in C# is also static? – ironic Sep 20 '10 at 9:06
  • 4
    @FredOverflow: Yes, that's a possibility. However, I tried to stick to the code given in the question. I suppose that size-1 was only a placeholder. – sbi Sep 20 '10 at 9:38
  • 1
    @ironic: I suppose so, otherwise the ref in iJeeves' code would not have been necessary. – fredoverflow Sep 20 '10 at 9:42
41

You cannot resize array, you can only allocate new one (with a bigger size) and copy old array's contents. If you don't want to use std::vector (for some reason) here is the code to it:

int size = 10;
int* arr = new int[size];

void resize() {
    size_t newSize = size * 2;
    int* newArr = new int[newSize];

    memcpy( newArr, arr, size * sizeof(int) );

    size = newSize;
    delete [] arr;
    arr = newArr;
}

code is from here http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/general/11111/.

9
  • 16
    And what happens when between the new and the delete, an exception is thrown? -1 for suggesting manual resource management to a newbie. (If you want to make this safe, you will need a smart pointer. If you add a few more utility functions, you'll arrive at std::vector.) – sbi Sep 20 '10 at 8:23
  • 18
    Thanks for -1 :) I'm suggesting newbie to understand that no magic is happening during array resize, new array is created and all elements are copied and if you write a code which resizes array by 1 each time you need an extra element to add, then you will be wasting resources. – Insomniac Sep 20 '10 at 8:30
  • 1
    If exception will be thrown between new and delete this means you're in real trouble, and you cannot really do anything in the resize function, you shouldn't catch exception there (maybe just to rethrow some more informative one) and let the caller to handle it. – Insomniac Sep 20 '10 at 8:33
  • 2
    You should try do delete anyhow. That's what smart pointers are for. – Matteo Italia Sep 20 '10 at 9:05
  • 1
    @user: He said in between, not on. If anyone is ever in a position to manually free some resource, they've failed. It needs to wrapped, period. Not that hard. – GManNickG Sep 20 '10 at 10:03
3
  1. Use std::vector or
  2. Write your own method. Allocate chunk of memory using new. with that memory you can expand till the limit of memory chunk.
1

You can do smth like this for 1D arrays. Here we use int*& because we want our pointer to be changeable.

#include<algorithm> // for copy

void resize(int*& a, size_t& n)
{
   size_t new_n = 2 * n;
   int* new_a = new int[new_n];
   copy(a, a + n, new_a);
   delete[] a;
   a = new_a;
   n = new_n;
}

For 2D arrays:

#include<algorithm> // for copy

void resize(int**& a, size_t& n)
{
   size_t new_n = 2 * n, i = 0;
   int** new_a = new int* [new_n];
   for (i = 0; i != new_n; ++i)
       new_a[i] = new int[100];
   for (i = 0; i != n; ++i)
   {
       copy(a[i], a[i] + 100, new_a[i]);
       delete[] a[i];
   }
   delete[] a;
   a = new_a;
   n = new_n;
}

Invoking of 1D array:

void myfn(int*& a, size_t& n)
{
   // do smth
   resize(a, n);
}

Invoking of 2D array:

void myfn(int**& a, size_t& n)
{
   // do smth
   resize(a, n);
}
  


   
0

Raw arrays aren't resizable in C++.

You should be using something like a Vector class which does allow resizing..

std::vector allows you to resize it as well as allowing dynamic resizing when you add elements (often making the manual resizing unnecessary for adding).

0

You cannot do that, see this question's answers. You may use std:vector instead.

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