4

I have a problem when using a variable to reference a module, it seems to mess up the passing of the variables:

TOTO.pm

package TOTO;

use Data::Dumper;

sub print {
       print Dumper(@_);
}

Perl program

package main;

TOTO::print('Hello World');
print ">>>>>>>>>>>\n";
my $package = 'TOTO';

$package->print('Hello World');

And the output is:

$VAR1 = 'Hello World';
>>>>>>>>>>>
$VAR1 = 'TOTO';
$VAR2 = 'Hello World';

Any advice on how to avoid having TOTO passed as the first variable?

  • 1
    I posted a comment which clearly came across as "curt." I didn't mean to make it unpleasant, just meant to ask for clarification of something I didn't understand. I apologize. Here is the question I had. What do you want to accomplish with a package name in a variable and then with using the arrow operator on it? This is usually done with objects. Knowing the purpose helps me in putting together a more suitable answer. – zdim May 28 '16 at 20:14
  • \&{ $package . '::print' }->() – ikegami May 28 '16 at 22:03
  • No offense taken, I am German. We are curt by default. I have module which evaluates at the beginning if it is possible to load an XS module, else another one (fallback): ` package Adaptor; our $reference; eval{require(xs::module)} if($@){$reference = "nonxs::module"} else{$reference = "xs::module"} $reference->method_call(); ` Several method names in the xs module are the same as in the Adaptor.pm, so when I export, they are overwritten. Hence the idea was to store the reference to the object in a variable. I will now rename the methods in the xs module and export. Thanks you! – juettemann May 29 '16 at 8:36
  • @juettemann That's a relief! Thank you for the response. I'd always recommend cleaning up conflicts first. if possible. Thanks for explaining it, I see now what you meant with it. – zdim May 30 '16 at 9:26
2

Short: The observed behavior comes from use of -> on a package name.

The arrow operator is used with a reference or with an object, which itself is a reference to a data structure that has been bless-ed into its class. (Or with a class name, see below.) That object or the class name is quietly passed as the first argument so that the whole system would work. Note that the package in the question does not define a class (objects cannot be created with it).

From Arrow operator in perlop

"-> " is an infix dereference operator, just as it is in C and C++. If the right side is either a [...] , {...} , or a (...) subscript, then the left side must be either a hard or symbolic reference to an array, a hash, or a subroutine respectively. (Or technically speaking, a location capable of holding a hard reference, if it's an array or hash reference being used for assignment.) See perlreftut and perlref.

It continues, to statements of direct interest in this problem

Otherwise, the right side is a method name or a simple scalar variable containing either the method name or a subroutine reference, and the left side must be either an object (a blessed reference) or a class name (that is, a package name). See perlobj.

So in uses related to classes the left-hand side may contain the class name, and class methods can then be invoked on it (or it can be just queried). Given that a class is a package then this is a package name.

The situation in the question falls within this so the package name is passed to the subroutine. However, according to the above quote it seems that the sub can only be a method, which isn't the case here. So it may be that this use of -> should really be disallowed. Either way, using it on a package which isn't a class strikes me as mistaken.


Update to clarification. This use was intended, to resolve an ambiguity in which package was loaded. The package name is saved into a variable and then the sub invoked on it, using the arrow operator. In this case code would have to be added to the sub to handle the first argument (package name) which is passed regardless of the invocation, by the courtesy of the arrow operator. But then we would have to allow a case when this is invoked on an object, ending up with a code that covers two distinct uses. I believe that it is better to change to a design that does not involve all this.


If you want to use a package, say as a library

File TOTO.pm

pacakge TOTO;

use Exporter;
our (@ISA, @EXPORT_OK);
@ISA = ('Exporter');
@EXPORT_OK = qw(prn);   # This can be asked for by user of package

use Data::Dumper;

sub prn {
       print Dumper(@_);
}

1;  # important for 'require' when this is used

I've changed the sub name to prn so that it's not a Perl library function. The main script

use warnings;
use strict;

use TOTO qw(prn);

prn("Hello World");

The fully qualified name TOTO::prn() can always be used. If you wanted to make this a class that would require a bit more in the package.

This package, TOTO, does not export anything by default, unless asked for. That's what @EXPORT_OK sets up and that's why we need to list functions to import into main:: when use TOTO. Start, for example, with perlmod

  • Using a variable as a class name is very useful in testing. Say you want to create 50 new objects in a test file, each inside of it's own scope. Instead of typing my $obj = Some::Module::Somewhere->new; 50 times, I usually do: my $mod = 'Some::Module::Somewhere'; (global scope) then, each time I need an object, my $obj = $mod->new;. Much shorter :) – stevieb May 28 '16 at 15:59
  • @stevieb OK, thanks for that -- I use the class name occasionally as well. But this is not a class -- OP sets up a package. – zdim May 28 '16 at 16:05
  • a package is a class: A class is simply a package: perlobj – stevieb May 28 '16 at 16:10
  • @stevieb No, a package is not a class. If you don't bless in it you can't create objects. You turned the quote around: A class is a package, the other way round is not true. – zdim May 28 '16 at 16:12
  • @stevieb That's a nice trick you have there :) Is everything OK with import hiearchies etc? – zdim May 28 '16 at 16:13
2

In the simplest terms, to create an object-oriented TOTO module you must create a file TOTO.pm that contains at least a constructor subroutine new

package TOTO;

sub new {
    bless {};
}

sub print {
    print "I am a TOTO object\n";
}

1;

That code must be saved in a file called TOTO.pmthat must match the package TOTO name in the source

Then you may write a program, say main.pl, that uses that module. For instance

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

use TOTO;

my $object = TOTO->new;

$object->print;

And then you have created a new TOTO object that says what it is

If I run

$ perl main.pl

I get the output

I am a TOTO object

You will want to make this code more useful, and there are many variations on this theme, but those are the basics

1

That's just how Perl's package system works. You need to handle this yourself in the sub being called. You can't change it prior to the call.

sub print {
    # special variable __PACKAGE__ contains "TOTO"

    if ($_[0] eq __PACKAGE__ || ref $_[0] eq __PACKAGE__){
        shift; # throw away class/object
    } 
    print Dumper(@_);
}

The ref $_[0] part isn't technically needed, because you don't have a constructor in your class (you call the method on the class only, but it will just do the right thing if you ever do use objects without having to change anything later).

  • When blessed, $_[0] could not be equal to package name! – F. Hauri May 28 '16 at 16:58
  • Nope, that's why I use || ref $_[0] ..., which catches the case where it is a blessed reference. Much like ref $thing eq 'HASH' – stevieb May 28 '16 at 16:58
  • Thanks @stevieb, this might come in handy in the future. – juettemann May 29 '16 at 8:55
1

Here's the issue

Any advice on how to avoid having TOTO passed as the first variable?

You've discovered the answer yourself. This works fine

TOTO::print('Hello World');

If you call it as

TOTO->print('Hello World');

then you're asking for perl to call print as a class method and pass ('TOTO', 'Hello World') as parameters to the TOTO::print subroutine

If TOTO is just a bunch of subroutines then, as you found, just call TOTO::totosub

0

Check differences between this:

TOTO::print("Hello World");

and

TOTO->print("Hello World");

which is not proper object notation, because TOTO is just a string.

Syntaxe object->function(arguments) whil pass object as 1st argument, to be stored as $this, for sample.

sub print {
    my $this = shift @_;
    print Dumper(@_);
}

May do the job (even if not blessed object).

Try this:

package TOTO;
use Data::Dumper;
sub new { return bless {}, shift; }

sub print {
    my $self = shift @_;
    if   ( scalar $self =~ /=HASH\(/ ) {
        print Dumper(@_);
    } else {
        print Dumper($self);
    }
}

package main;

my $package = TOTO->new();

$package->print("Hello World");

TOTO::print("Hello World");

This could output:

$VAR1 = 'Hello World';
$VAR1 = 'Hello World';

And have a look at man perlobj, man perlootut and man perlmodlib

  • That'll work, but it'll break TOTO::print(). The string passed in will be put into $this. – stevieb May 28 '16 at 16:30
  • also, technically, TOTO->print() is valid. It's no different than my $log = Log::Log4perl->get_logger; Note also that it's a bareword, not a quoted string. – stevieb May 28 '16 at 16:33
  • @stevieb Especially, in man perlobj, search for bareword! <<...it sometimes interprets a bareword's meaning incorrectly. For example, the construct Class->new() can be interpreted as either 'Class'->new() or Class()->new()...>> – F. Hauri May 28 '16 at 16:54
  • 1
    Are you familiar with Perl? TOTO->print("Hello World") is a perfectly good object-oriented call. It is a call to the class method print, and you usually see it as a call to the constructor my $object = TOTO->new. – Borodin May 28 '16 at 19:11
  • 1
    @F.Hauri: I think you are out of touch with modern Perl. If you insist, then you may call my $toto = 'TOTO'->new, but Perl has a DWIM approach so that both work fine. If there is any substance behind " I don't like barewords! " then please post a new question, otherwise I think you are distracting from the original question. – Borodin May 28 '16 at 20:21

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