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I'm trying to understand physical plans on spark but I'm not understanding some parts because they seem different from traditional rdbms. For example, in this plan below, it's a plan about a query over a hive table. The query is this:

select
        l_returnflag,
        l_linestatus,
        sum(l_quantity) as sum_qty,
        sum(l_extendedprice) as sum_base_price,
        sum(l_extendedprice * (1 - l_discount)) as sum_disc_price,
        sum(l_extendedprice * (1 - l_discount) * (1 + l_tax)) as sum_charge,
        avg(l_quantity) as avg_qty,
        avg(l_extendedprice) as avg_price,
        avg(l_discount) as avg_disc,
        count(*) as count_order
    from
        lineitem
    where
        l_shipdate <= '1998-09-16'
    group by
        l_returnflag,
        l_linestatus
    order by
        l_returnflag,
        l_linestatus;


== Physical Plan ==
Sort [l_returnflag#35 ASC,l_linestatus#36 ASC], true, 0
+- ConvertToUnsafe
   +- Exchange rangepartitioning(l_returnflag#35 ASC,l_linestatus#36 ASC,200), None
      +- ConvertToSafe
         +- TungstenAggregate(key=[l_returnflag#35,l_linestatus#36], functions=[(sum(l_quantity#31),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(sum(l_extendedpr#32),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(sum((l_extendedprice#32 * (1.0 - l_discount#33))),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(sum(((l_extendedprice#32 * (1.0l_discount#33)) * (1.0 + l_tax#34))),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_quantity#31),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_extendedprice#32),mode=Fl,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_discount#33),mode=Final,isDistinct=false),(count(1),mode=Final,isDistinct=false)], output=[l_returnflag#35,l_linestatus,sum_qty#0,sum_base_price#1,sum_disc_price#2,sum_charge#3,avg_qty#4,avg_price#5,avg_disc#6,count_order#7L])
            +- TungstenExchange hashpartitioning(l_returnflag#35,l_linestatus#36,200), None
               +- TungstenAggregate(key=[l_returnflag#35,l_linestatus#36], functions=[(sum(l_quantity#31),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(sum(l_exdedprice#32),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(sum((l_extendedprice#32 * (1.0 - l_discount#33))),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(sum(((l_extendedpri32 * (1.0 - l_discount#33)) * (1.0 + l_tax#34))),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_quantity#31),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_extendedce#32),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(avg(l_discount#33),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false),(count(1),mode=Partial,isDistinct=false)], output=[l_retulag#35,l_linestatus#36,sum#64,sum#65,sum#66,sum#67,sum#68,count#69L,sum#70,count#71L,sum#72,count#73L,count#74L])
                  +- Project [l_discount#33,l_linestatus#36,l_tax#34,l_quantity#31,l_extendedprice#32,l_returnflag#35]
                     +- Filter (l_shipdate#37 <= 1998-09-16)
                        +- HiveTableScan [l_discount#33,l_linestatus#36,l_tax#34,l_quantity#31,l_extendedprice#32,l_shipdate#37,l_returnflag#35], astoreRelation default, lineitem, None

For what I'm understanding in the plan is:

  1. First starts with a Hive table scan

  2. Then it filter using where the condition

  3. Then project to get the columns we want

  4. Then TungstenAggregate?

  5. Then TungstenExchange?

  6. Then TungstenAggregate again?

  7. Then ConvertToSafe?

  8. Then sorts the final result

But I'm not understanding the 4, 5, 6 and 7 steps. Do you know what they are? I'm looking for information about this so I can understand the plan but I'm not finding anything concrete.

34

Lets look at the structure of the SQL query you use:

SELECT
    ...  -- not aggregated columns  #1
    ...  -- aggregated columns      #2
FROM
    ...                          -- #3
WHERE
    ...                          -- #4
GROUP BY
    ...                          -- #5
ORDER BY
    ...                          -- #6

As you already suspect:

  • Filter (...) corresponds to predicates in WHERE clause (#4)
  • Project ... limits number of columns to those required by an union of (#1 and #2, and #4 / #6 if not present in SELECT)
  • HiveTableScan corresponds to FROM clause (#3)

Remaining parts can attributed as follows:

  • #2 from SELECT clause - functions field in TungstenAggregates
  • GROUP BY clause (#5):

    • TungstenExchange / hash partitioning
    • key field in TungstenAggregates
  • #6 - ORDER BY clause.

Project Tungsten in general describes a set of optimizations used by Spark DataFrames (-sets) including:

  • explicit memory management with sun.misc.Unsafe. It means "native" (off-heap) memory usage and explicit memory allocation / freeing outside GC management. These conversions correspond to ConvertToUnsafe / ConvertToSafe steps in the execution plan. You can learn some interesting details about unsafe from Understanding sun.misc.Unsafe
  • code generation - different meta-programming tricks designed to generate code that better optimized during compilation. You can think of it as an internal Spark compiler which does things like rewriting nice functional code into ugly for loops.

You can learn more about Tungsten in general from Project Tungsten: Bringing Apache Spark Closer to Bare Metal. Apache Spark 2.0: Faster, Easier, and Smarter provides some examples of code generation.

TungstenAggregate occurs twice because data is first aggregated locally on each partition, than shuffled, and finally merged. If you are familiar with RDD API this process is roughly equivalent to reduceByKey.

If execution plan is not clear you can also try to convert resulting DataFrame to RDD and analyze output of toDebugString.

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  • Thanks for your answer. I just didnt understand clearly this part "#2 from SELECT clause - functions field in TungstenAggregates". If you can explain better woud be nice!
    – codin
    May 30 '16 at 2:15
  • Functions field lists all the aggregations which are performed in a given stage, while Key field describes grouping. it is df.groupBy(*key).agg(*functions).
    – zero323
    May 30 '16 at 6:41
  • @zero323 GROUP BY clause (#4): should be GROUP BY clause (#5):. I would like to edit by myself, but stackOverflow show me that Edits must be at least 6 characters; is there something else to improve in this post? Oct 31 '19 at 11:24
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Tungsten is the new memory engine in Spark since 1.4, which manages data outside JVM to save some GC overhead. You can imagine doing that involves copy data from and to JVM. That's it. In Spark 1.5 you can turn Tungsten off through spark.sql.tungsten.enabled then you will see the "old" plan, in Spark 1.6 I think you can't turn it off any more.

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