28

Is there a way to generate sequence of characters or numbers in javascript?

For example, I want to create array that contains eight 1s. I can do it with for loop, but wondering whether there is a jQuery library or javascript function that can do it for me?

  • Whats wrong with using the for loop? – Russell Dias Sep 20 '10 at 12:39
  • 1
    Is there any necessity for a library to do this job ? I don't think so =) – user372551 Sep 20 '10 at 12:41
  • Not at all. This is clearly something best solved at a language level, not a library level. I've modified the question accordingly. – Dagg Nabbit Sep 20 '10 at 12:43
  • 2
    I think this is a very valid question, there are languages that do this out-of-box, if you have to create 3 dropdowns day/month/year then 3 for loops seems messy, however it also seems like it's the only quick way to do it – Rob May 23 '13 at 11:30

14 Answers 14

14

You can make your own re-usable function I suppose, for your example:

function makeArray(count, content) {
   var result = [];
   if(typeof content == "function") {
      for(var i = 0; i < count; i++) {
         result.push(content(i));
      }
   } else {
      for(var i = 0; i < count; i++) {
         result.push(content);
      }
   }
   return result;
}

Then you could do either of these:

var myArray = makeArray(8, 1);
//or something more complex, for example:
var myArray = makeArray(8, function(i) { return i * 3; });

You can give it a try here, note the above example doesn't rely on jQuery at all so you can use it without. You just don't gain anything from the library for something like this :)

  • i think result.push(i); should be ` result.push(content);` ahh... edited already.. – Gabriele Petrioli Sep 20 '10 at 12:43
  • @Gaby - Yup, noticed that when I setup the demo, thanks :) – Nick Craver Sep 20 '10 at 12:44
  • Hey, thanks for this. Thought there could be something similar to what's available in MatLab, i.e. create vector of some length that will contain certain elements. – user338195 Sep 20 '10 at 13:02
38

Without a for loop, here is a solution:

Array.apply(0, Array(8)).map(function() { return 1; })

The explanation follows.

Array(8) produces a sparse array with 8 elements, all undefined. The apply trick will turn it into a dense array. Finally, with map, we replace that undefined the (same) value of 1.

  • That's really cool, although I'm not quite understanding it. How exactly does the Array.apply turn that array into a dense array? I'd love to understand exactly what's going on in that trick. – Alexandr Kurilin Feb 7 '13 at 6:47
  • 5
    Here is a good short explanation on arrays: 2ality.com/2012/06/dense-arrays.html. – Ariya Hidayat Feb 10 '13 at 4:39
  • 6
    I love this. Found it on a search and it was exactly what I was looking for. Here is a slight modification to create a series: Array.apply(0, Array(8)).map(function(_,b) { return b + 1; }) => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] the args to map are the element, index, array for other fun uses. – stoolio Apr 10 '15 at 1:54
16
for (var i=8, a=[]; i--;) a.push(1);
  • 7
    not enough jQuery =) – user372551 Sep 20 '10 at 12:43
  • 6
    needs moar jquery? hmmm, does this work: for (var i=8, a=[]; i--;) a.push($(1)); – Dagg Nabbit Sep 20 '10 at 12:44
  • @no just kidding, OP may not be satisfied, 'cause it is missing jQuery, lol. In your comment a.push($(1)), it pushes jQuery objects into the array not the numbers :) – user372551 Sep 20 '10 at 12:52
  • @Avinash, I know, was just screwing around ;) – Dagg Nabbit Sep 20 '10 at 19:08
10

Using Jquery:


$.map($(Array(8)),function(val, i) { return i; })

This returns:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

$.map($(Array(8)),function() { return 1; })

This returns:

[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]

  • 1
    The $ in $(Array(8)) is not necessary here. Just $.map(Array(8), function(){ return 1; }) would suffice. – Antony Hatchkins Jan 30 '15 at 6:57
10

In case you are using newer Javascript syntax, the same can be achieved using:

Array(8).fill(1)

The following works fine too but as Matt pointed out, the keyword 'new' is redundant.

new Array(8).fill(1)
  • 3
    This can be extended to a sequence easily as well.. Array(8).fill().map((v,i)=>i) – Matt Apr 15 '17 at 1:04
  • 1
    and doesn't require the new – Matt Apr 15 '17 at 4:05
  • Or, for a sequence: [...Array(8)].map((_, i) => i) – Quentin 2 Feb 23 '18 at 12:06
4

2016 - Modern Browser functionality has arrived. No need for jquery all the time.

Array.from({length: 8}, (el, index) => 1 /* or index */);

You can substitute the arrow function with a simple callback function to reach a slightly wider range of supported browsers. It's, for me at least, the easiest way to iterate over an initialized array in one step.

Note: IE is not supported in this solution, but there is a polyfill for that at developer.mozilla.org/...

3

A sequence is a stream, which computes the value when it is needed. This requires only a bit memory but more CPU time when the values is used.

An array is a list of precomputed values. This takes some time before the first value can be used. And it requires much memory, because all possible values of the sequence must be stored in memory. And you have to define an upper limit.

This means, that in most cases it is no good idea to create an array with sequence values. Instead it is better to implement the sequence as a real sequence, which is limited just by the word length of the CPU.

function make_sequence (value, increment)
{
  if (!value) value = 0;
  if (!increment) increment = function (value) { return value + 1; };

  return function () {
    let current = value;
    value = increment (value);
    return current;
  };
}

i = make_sequence()
i() => 0
i() => 1
i() => 2

j = make_sequence(1, function(x) { return x * 2; })
j() => 1
j() => 2
j() => 4
j() => 8
  • upvoting because I'm trying to get my head around closures and I think this is a really good example, amiright? – stib Oct 11 '16 at 12:31
  • 1
    @stib Exactly. The anonymous function returned by make_sequence captures the environment containing value and increment, which means the function has read and write access to the variables. That's all what matters. A (lexical) closure is nothing more than a dynamically generated function having access to the environment visible at the code position, where the function has been created. There are also dynamically scoped closures but apart from Emacs they are rarely used. – ceving Oct 11 '16 at 13:32
1
The fastest way to define an array of 8 1s is to define it-
var A= [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1];

// You'd have to need a lot of 1s to make a dedicated function worthwhile.

// Maybe in the Matrix, when you want a lot of Smiths:

Array.repeat= function(val, len){
    for(var i= len, a= []; i--; ) a[i]= val;
    return a;
}
var A= Array.repeat('Smith',100)

/*  returned value: (String)
Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith
*/
  • should that be for(var i= len; a= []; i--; ) a[i]= val; (semicolon after len instead of comma)? – stib Oct 11 '16 at 12:29
1

range(start,end,step): With ES6 Iterators

You can easily create range() generator function which can function as an iterator. This means you don't have to pre-generate the entire array.

function * range ( start, end, step ) {
  let state = start;
  while ( state < end ) {
    yield state;
    state += step;
  }
  return;
};

Now you may want to create something that pre-generates the array from the iterator and returns a list. This is useful for functions that accept an array. For this we can use Array.from()

const generate_array = (start,end,step) => Array.from( range(start,end,step) );

Now you can generate a static array easily,

const array = generate_array(1,10,2);

But when something desires an iterator (or gives you the option to use an iterator) you can easily create one too.

for ( const i of range(1, Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER, 7) ) {
  console.log(i)
}
1

One liner:

new Array(10).fill(1).map( (_, i) => i+1 )

Yields:

[ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ]
0

Typescript method based on Ariya Hidayat code:

/**
 * Generates sequence of numbers from zero.
 * @ param {number} count Count of numbers in result array.
 * @ return {Array<number>} Sequence of numbers from zero to (count - 1).
 */
public static sequence(count: number): Array<number>
{
    return Array.apply(0, Array(count)).map((x, i) =>
    {
        return i;
    });
}
0

If like me you use linspace a lot, you can modify your version of linspace easily like so:

function linSeq(x0, xN) {
    return linspace(x0, xN, Math.abs(xN-x0)+1);
}

function linspace(x0, xN, n){

    dx = (xN - x0)/(n-1);
    var x = [];
    for(var i =0; i < n; ++i){
        x.push(x0 + i*dx);
    }

    return x;
}

You can then use linSeq in any direction, e.g. linSeq(2,4) generates 2,3,4 while linSeq(4,2) generates 4,3,2.

0

Generating an integer sequence is something that should definitely be made more convenient in JavaScript. Here is a recursive function returns an integer array.

function intSequence(start, end, n = start, arr = []) {
  return n === end ? arr.concat(n)
    : intSequence(start, end, start < end ? n + 1 : n - 1, arr.concat(n));
}

$> intSequence(1, 1)
<- Array [ 1 ]

$> intSequence(1, 3)
<- Array(3) [ 1, 2, 3 ]

$> intSequence(3, -3)
<- Array(7) [ 3, 2, 1, 0, -1, -2, -3 ]
-1

Why not just a simple join and split?

function seq(len, value)
{
    // create an array
    // join it using the value we want
    // split it
    return (new Array(len + 1)).join(value).split("");
}

seq(10, "a");
["a", "a", "a", "a", "a", "a", "a", "a", "a", "a"]

seq(5, 1);
["1", "1", "1", "1", "1"]

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