2

I want to code simple digital clock in the python shell. I want to avoid using tkinter if possible. This is what I currently have;

import time
while True:
    from datetime import datetime
    now = datetime.now()  
    print ("%s/%s/%s %s:%s:%s" % (now.month,now.day,now.year,now.hour,now.minute,now.second)) 
    time.sleep(1)

This produces a recurring print out, something like this;

06/29/16 23:08:32

06/29/16 23:08:33

06/29/16 23:08:34

I know this is crude, I'm still learning. I just want one line with a "ticking" digital clock in the shell. I'm using python 3.5.1 on idle and windows 10.

If this isn't possible, I'd very much like to know why.

Kindest thanks

10

If you're just printing out a fixed length output like this each time, you can use the carriage return character to rewind to the start of the line, as long as you don't print a newline. Example:

# Note trailing comma, that suppresses the newline in Python
print ("%s/%s/%s %s:%s:%s" % (now.month,now.day,now.year,now.hour,now.minute,now.second)),

# Now rewind back to the start of the line. Again, not trailing comma
print("\r"),

Now, you may also notice that nothing is ever printed to the screen. This is because standard out is buffered, so you can flush with this:

# At the top...
import sys

# In the loop, after the first print
sys.stdout.flush()

This all works as follows. Imagine that there is actually a cursor on screen. You first print out the time with the first print (and the flush), then you move the cursor back to the start of the line with print("\r"),. This doesn't actually remove any of the characters, it just moves the cursor. You then write the next time out again. Because it nicely happens to be the exact same length, the time gets written out again, replacing the old characters.

The resulting script is then as follows:

import time
import sys

while True:
    from datetime import datetime
    now = datetime.now()
    print ("%s/%s/%s %s:%s:%s" % (now.month,now.day,now.year,now.hour,now.minute,now.second)),
    sys.stdout.flush()
    print("\r"),
    time.sleep(1)

If you want finer grained control over what's going on, you can start using the curses library, but I imagine that's overkill for what you're trying to do here.

EDIT: As @PadraicCunningham mentioned in the comments, the correct syntax to suppress newline printing in Python 3 and force the contents to flush to the screen is the following:

print("hello", flush=True, end="")

Also, as @AlexHall mentions, the print statement does not actually print a fixed width statement; so to do this, we should use strftime() instead.

Therefore the correct program is:

import time

while True:
    from datetime import datetime,strftime
    now = datetime.now()
    print (strftime("%m/%d/%Y %H:%M:%S"), end="", flush=True)
    print("\r", end="", flush=True)
    time.sleep(1)
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    You could set flush=True in the print function but I don't think whatever you do is going to work in idle – Padraic Cunningham May 29 '16 at 22:54
  • @PadraicCunningham: thanks, I didn't realise that was an option. I'm not sure about IDLE myself, and sadly don't have it lying around to test. It does work in the Python REPL though. – slugonamission May 29 '16 at 22:55
  • 1
    No worries, the OP is using python3.5 so you would also set end="" to remove newlines, from memory I didn't think this worked in idle, I think installing idlex may do the trick idlex.sourceforge.net – Padraic Cunningham May 29 '16 at 23:01
  • 1
    Whoops, I'm still used to Python 2. Updated though, cheers :) – slugonamission May 29 '16 at 23:03
  • 1
    @AlexHall, whoops, removed .flush(). As for requiring flush=True, that completely depends on your platform. Linux and OS X's libc typically buffers output, and only flushes to the screen on a newline; I'm not 100% sure on Windows' behaviour. – slugonamission May 29 '16 at 23:15
2

tried this in repl.it, this worked for me...( added commas & now.strftime )

import time
from datetime import datetime
while True:   
    now = datetime.now()
    print (now.strftime("%m/%d/%Y %H:%M:%S"), end="", flush=True),
    print("\r", end="", flush=True),
    time.sleep(1)

|improve this answer|||||
1

All you need is:

from time import strftime
while True:
    print (strftime("%m/%d/%Y %H:%M:%S"), end="", flush=True)
    print("\r", end="", flush=True)
    time.sleep(1)
|improve this answer|||||
0

The following code is working for me.

from time import sleep
from datetime import datetime
while True:
    now = datetime.now()
    stdout.write(now.strftime("\r%m/%d/%Y %H:%M:%S")),
    stdout.flush()
    sleep(1)
stdout.write("\n")
|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.