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This is an object that is returned as a response in an HTTP POST request:

res.body
=> "{\"id\":\"a3adasfaf3\",\"url\":\"https://someurl/a3adasfaf3\",\"created\":\"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z\",\"modified\":\"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z\",\"files_hash\":\"cljhlk2j3l2kj34hlke18\",\"language\":\"ruby\",\"title\":\"Some weird hello world message\",\"public\":false,\"owner\":\"kljhlk2jh34lk2jh4l2kj3h4l2kj4h23l4kjh2l4k\",\"files\":[{\"name\":\"Some-weird-hello-world-message.rb\",\"content\":\"puts \\\"Some weird hello world message.\\\"\\r\\n\"}]}"

I am trying to pull out, and translate the various attributes of that response. For instance, at the very least the id and url.

How do I do this?

For the record, I am using Ruby's NET/HTTP std lib to send the POST request and get back this response.

Edit 1

For bonus points, all I want is the actual value stored in each attribute (i.e. the actual id (which is just a string) and a url (which is a typical URL). So if you included how I might both access that attribute and then sanitize it at the same time that would be awesome.

3
  • 2
    try JSON.parse(res)
    – Gagan Gami
    Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:27
  • Hey you can used Json.parse(res)["id"] for id and for url Json.parse(res)["url"] Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:28
  • @VishalJAIN I am now realizing that I can do that. Thanks. Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

5

Use JSON.parse to parse the response.

response = "{\"id\":\"a3adasfaf3\",\"url\":\"https://someurl/a3adasfaf3\",\"created\":\"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z\",\"modified\":\"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z\",\"files_hash\":\"cljhlk2j3l2kj34hlke18\",\"language\":\"ruby\",\"title\":\"Some weird hello world message\",\"public\":false,\"owner\":\"kljhlk2jh34lk2jh4l2kj3h4l2kj4h23l4kjh2l4k\",\"files\":[{\"name\":\"Some-weird-hello-world-message.rb\",\"content\":\"puts \\\"Some weird hello world message.\\\"\\r\\n\"}]}"

require 'json'

JSON.parse response
# output:
# {"id"=>"a3adasfaf3", "url"=>"https://someurl/a3adasfaf3", "created"=>"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z", "modified"=>"2016-05-30T07:00:58Z", "files_hash"=>"cljhlk2j3l2kj34hlke18", "language"=>"ruby", "title"=>"Some weird hello world message", "public"=>false, "owner"=>"kljhlk2jh34lk2jh4l2kj3h4l2kj4h23l4kjh2l4k", "files"=>[{"name"=>"Some-weird-hello-world-message.rb", "content"=>"puts \"Some weird hello world message.\"\r\n"}]}

response["name"] # => a3adasfaf3
5
  • I like where you are going, can you just add a code example and I will accept it. Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:27
  • This is perfect. Thanks! Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:29
  • What's the benefit to using JSON.parse over eval(response)? Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:32
  • 1
    eval can be basically used to convert string to code, like this: eval('7*40'). Read more about eval.
    – Sahil
    Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:38
  • 1
    Do not use eval, if some how someone hacks the service, and if you use eval for parsing then the code will get executed.
    – Sahil
    Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:44
2

You need to parse it with JSON.parse Example:

parsed_hash = JSON.parse res.body

Result:

{
            "id" => "a3adasfaf3",
           "url" => "https://someurl/a3adasfaf3",
       "created" => "2016-05-30T07:00:58Z",
      "modified" => "2016-05-30T07:00:58Z",
    "files_hash" => "cljhlk2j3l2kj34hlke18",
      "language" => "ruby",
         "title" => "Some weird hello world message",
        "public" => false,
         "owner" => "kljhlk2jh34lk2jh4l2kj3h4l2kj4h23l4kjh2l4k",
         "files" => [
        [0] {
               "name" => "Some-weird-hello-world-message.rb",
            "content" => "puts \"Some weird hello world message.\"\r\n"
        }
    ]
}

To access the id:

parsed_hash['id']

To access the url:

parsed_hash['url']

Want to access it by symbols ?

parsed_hash = JSON.parse(res.body).symbolize_keys

You can now access id and url by parsed_hash[:id] and parsed_hash[:url]

1
  • What's the benefit to using JSON.parse over eval(response)? Commented May 30, 2016 at 7:32

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