9

last weekend i read some stuff about interfaces, abstract classes and design principles. At the end i got a bit confused and i tried to build an example of what i learned (or thought i had learned).

Here is my example: The case would be to model a class that holds informations about trees.

First of all i would make an interface:

public interface Tree{
     public void grow();
}

The interface holds all methods that should be implemented by the concrete trees. So far so good but such a tree needs some attributes (variables) that are shared over all tree families. For that purpose i would use a abstract class:

public abstract class AbstractTree implements Tree {
    private String barColor;
    private int maxHeight;
    private boolean isEvergreen;
}

Is this the right way or am i not able to make a kind of contract about attributes (variables) that should be in the other classes?

After the attribute part is done i would like to have 3 type of trees.

  • Oak
  • Maple
  • Spruce

So each of these tree "tpyes" can have individual variables.

public class OakTreeImpl extends AbstractTree{
    private String barColor;
    private int maxHeight;
    private boolean isEvergreen;
    private String foo;
    @Override
    public void grow() {
    }   
}

Does this approach sound right in an object-oriented design principles way or am i totally wrong with it?

6
  • 3
    The AbstractTree should use protected fields so you don't need to redeclare them in the implementation – OneCricketeer May 30 '16 at 9:31
  • why not use abstract class only instead? – Vedant Kekan May 30 '16 at 9:34
  • I declare them as protected in the abstract and remove them from the Impl-Class? And i can still access (get / set) the values of the variables even if i dont "see" them directly in the class? – user2742409 May 30 '16 at 9:36
  • @user2742409 Correct – Draken May 30 '16 at 9:39
  • 2
    Then why not declare the member access in the abstract class? E.g. public int getMaxHeight(){return this.maxHeight;} You can still override them later in the implementation, but it's not forced. If you want to force overriding, then declare them in the abstract class as public abstract int getMaxHeight(); – Draken May 30 '16 at 9:43
5

Although this may partially be subjective, I have to concur with the other answers given so far.

The Tree interface is NOT obsolete. When you want to model a Tree, then there should be a Tree interface, clearly stating the methods that every Tree has.

Particularly, I'd advice against the recommendation to simply replace it with the AbstractTree class. Some people say that you should hardly use abstract classes at all (e.g. Jaroslav Tulach in "Practical API Design"). I'd at least say that you should use them very conservatively. Most importantly: You should try to avoid letting appear abstract classes in the public interface of other classes. For example, if you had another class/interface, with a method like

void makeGrow(Tree tree) {
    System.out.println("Growing "+tree);
    tree.grow();
}

then replacing this appearance of Tree to AbstractTree will decrease flexibility. You will never be able to use a class that does not inherit from AbstractTree - and considering that you can only inherit from one class, this may be a severe limitation. (You can always implement multiple interfaces - so an interface does not limit the flexibility here).

But even if you use an abstract based class, I'd recommend to use protected fields conservatively. Or, more generally, be aware of the implications of inheriting from a class, as described in "Item 17 - Design and document for inheritance or else prohibit it" of "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch.

In many cases, you don't want the inheriting class to have full access to the fields. So you should at least consider making the fields private, and only offer protected methods for the kind of access that you want to grant to inheriting classes.

public interface Tree{
    public void grow();
}

abstract class AbstractTree implements Tree {

    // Do the values of these fields ever change? If not,
    // then make them final, and set them only in the
    // constructor
    private final String barColor;
    private final int maxHeight;
    private final boolean evergreen;

    protected AbstractTree(...) { ... }

    // Subclasses are only allowed to read (but not write) these fields
    protected final String getBarColor() { return barColor; }
    protected final intgetMaxHeight() { return maxHeight; }
    protected final boolean isEvergreen() { return evergreen; }
}
4
  • 1
    Your proclamed design philosophy is not against my statement. However, I do believe that if you have an abstract class for trees, you should not create a seperate interface that is not only called Tree, but will only be used by the abstract tree class. This makes no sense! An interface is only usefull, if you don't know who will implement it or need this extra flexibility. The only reason we are using abstract at all in this case is because you should not be able to instantiate a new Tree without specifying what kind (Maple, Oak, etc.) it is. – 000000000000000000000 May 30 '16 at 12:38
  • 1
    @000000000000000000000 "...but will only be used by the abstract tree class" - I think that's the point: What do you want to pass to a method that receives a tree? Do you want to pass in the AbstractTree (which, despite the name, is specific, because it has to extend AbstractTree), or do you want to be able to pass in any Tree, regardless of how it is implemented? (I.e. regardless of whether this implementation (of the interface!) is based on AbstractTree or not)? Again, it may partially be subjective and my approach may look like "overengineering", but I prefer interfaces here – Marco13 May 30 '16 at 13:18
  • 1
    (And, by the way: I didn't really understand why you think that there may be justification for the Plant interface, but not for the Tree interface. That's just a question of what should be the "root" of the conceptual hierarchy, and I don't see how this advocates against modeling Tree as an interface) – Marco13 May 30 '16 at 13:20
  • My intention regarding to my second question i posted today would be passing any kind of tree in another method of class so i would stay with your arguments @Marco13. And also thanks to you and your effort for this answer :) – user2742409 May 30 '16 at 13:41
8

This does work, however it does not make much sense, since the interface is totally obsolete in this case.
You should add the grow method to your AbstractTree like this:

public abstract class AbstractTree{
    protected String barColor;
    protected int maxHeight;
    protected boolean isEvergreen;

    public abstract void grow();
}

Using an interface would make sense, if you wanted to have different kinds of plants that should all be able to grow for instance.

interface Plant{
    void grow();
}

abstract class Tree implements Plant{
    void grow(){ /* do sth */ }
}

abstract class Flower implements Plant{
    void grow(){ /* do sth totally different */
}

The purpose of an interface is to provide the same method in multiple classes with different implementations, whereas an abstract class provides methods and attributes that are shared in all of their child classes.
If a method in an abstract class is also abstract, every child class must implement it themselves.

1
  • Thank you very much, now i get it, hopefully :D – user2742409 May 30 '16 at 9:47
7

I would rather mark the instance variables as protected.

Because all protected members of a super class is accessible to child classes. If and only if, parent and child classes are in the same package

public abstract class AbstractTree implements Tree {
    protected String barColor;
    protected int maxHeight;
    protected boolean isEvergreen;
}

public class OakTreeImpl extends AbstractTree{

    // I can access barColor, maxHeight, isEvergreen in this class

    @Override
    public void grow() {

    }   
}
1
  • You are totally right but i guess the Answer of 000000000000000000000 fits more to my not really well asked question. But thx for the effort. – user2742409 May 30 '16 at 9:46

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