43

I'm trying to build C/C++ in Visual Studio Code. I installed C/C++ and all the relevant extensions.

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("Test C now\n");
    return 0;
}

But there's a green line under #include <stdio.h> saying "Add include path to settings". When I click it, it moves over to "c_cpp_properties.json".

How and where can I add include paths in the configurations below?

"configurations": [
    {
        "name": "Mac",
        "includePath": ["/usr/include"]
    }
]
39

How and where can I add include paths in the configurations below?

The list is a string array, hence adding an include path would look something like;

"configurations": [
    {
        "name": "Mac",
        "includePath": ["/usr/local/include",
            "/path/to/additional/includes",
            "/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.11.sdk/usr/include"
        ]
    }
]

Source; cpptools blog 31 March 2016.

The linked source has a gif showing the format for the Win32 configuration, but the same applies to the others.

The above sample includes the SDK (OSX 10.11) path if Xcode is installed.

Note I find it can take a while to update once the include path has been changed.

The cpptools extension can be found here.

Further documentation (from Microsoft) on the C++ language support in VSCode can be found here.


During 2018, the C++ extension added another option to the configuration compilerPath of the c_cpp_properties.json file;

compilerPath (optional) The absolute path to the compiler you use to build your project. The extension will query the compiler to determine the system include paths and default defines to use for IntelliSense.

If used, the includePath would not be needed since the IntelliSense will use the compiler to figure out the system include paths.


For the sake of preservation (from the discussion), the following are basic snippets for the contents of the tasks.json file to compile and execute either a C++ file, or a C file. They allow for spaces in the file name (requires escaping the additional quotes in the json using \"). The shell is used as the runner, thus allowing the compilation (clang...) and the execution (&& ./a.out) of the program. It also assumes that the tasks.json "lives" in the local workspace (under the directory .vscode). Further task.json details, such as supported variables etc. can be found here.

For C++;

{ 
    "version": "0.1.0", 
    "isShellCommand": true, 
    "taskName": "GenericBuild", 
    "showOutput": "always", 
    "command": "sh", 
    "suppressTaskName": false, 
    "args": ["-c", "clang++ -std=c++14 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -pthread \"${file}\" && ./a.out"]
}

For C;

{ 
    "version": "0.1.0", 
    "isShellCommand": true, 
    "taskName": "GenericBuild", 
    "showOutput": "always", 
    "command": "sh", 
    "suppressTaskName": false, 
    "args": ["-c", "clang -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -pthread \"${file}\" && ./a.out"] // command arguments... 
}
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat. – Niall Jun 2 '16 at 9:38
  • @stdio.h. I recommend a good book on C to delve into the language; there is a list here on SO at stackoverflow.com/q/562303/3747990. If you are interested, there is also a C++ list; stackoverflow.com/q/388242/3747990. Both those lists contain at least one book available online that will get you up and going and provide a great context to a lot of the other material you find on SO and other tutorial websites. I like these list because they are curated list and not just a random dump off the internet. – Niall Jun 3 '16 at 6:58
  • 4
    I just want to add that I found the instructions to create the c_cpp_properties.json, tasks.json and launch.json here code.visualstudio.com/docs/languages/cpp – agwntr Jan 11 '17 at 9:00
  • 1
    Have in mind that you can use /** for a recursive include: "includePath":[ "C:/path/to/all/includes/**" ]. – Danijel Dec 7 '18 at 10:31
  • 1
    In newer versions of the C/C++ extension, it is recommended to use the compilerPath property to set the system includes/defines instead of adding them to the includePath property. – Bob Brown Mar 11 at 16:58
10

For Mac users only installed Command Line Tools instead of Xcode, check the /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/ directory, for example::

"configurations": [{
    "name": "Mac",
    "includePath": [
        "/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/usr/lib/clang/8.1.0/include/",
        "/Library/Developer/CommandLineTools/SDKs/MacOSX.sdk/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/tr1/",
        "/usr/include/c++/4.2.1",
        "/usr/local/include",
        "/usr/include"
    ]
}]

You probably need to adjust the path if you have different version of Command Line Tools installed.

Note: You can also open/generate the c_cpp_properties.json file via the C/Cpp: Edit Configurations command from the Command Palette (⇧⌘P).

  • In the current c_cpp_properties.json file, it states at the top of the file: "!!! WARNING !!!": "PLEASE DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE! USE docs.platformio.org/page/projectconf/…" I've confirmed also, that when adding references to this file they can get removed – CrazyMerlin Dec 6 '18 at 2:28
1

In your user settings add:

"C_Cpp.default.includePath":["path1","path2"]
1

The best way to configure the standard headers for your project is by setting the compilerPath property to the configurations in your c_cpp_properties.json file. It is not recommended to add system include paths to the includePath property.

Another option if you prefer not to use c_cpp_properties.json is to set the C_Cpp.default.compilerPath setting.

0

This answer maybe late but I just happened to fix the issue. Here is my c_cpp_properties.json file:

{
"configurations": [
    {
        "name": "Linux",
        "includePath": [
            "${workspaceFolder}/**",                
            "/usr/include/c++/5.4.0/",
            "usr/local/include/",
            "usr/include/"
        ],
        "defines": [],
        "compilerPath": "/usr/bin/gcc",
        "cStandard": "c11",
        "cppStandard": "c++14",
        "intelliSenseMode": "clang-x64"
    }
],
"version": 4

}

  • compilerPath is the way to go. You should remove system include paths from the includePath property. – Bob Brown Mar 11 at 16:57

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