128

I have the following logging method:

  private logData<T, S>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData?: S) {
    this.logger.log(operation + ' ' + this.url);
    if (requestData) {
      this.logger.log('SENT');
      this.logger.log(requestData);
    }
    this.logger.log('RECEIVED');
    this.logger.log(responseData);
    return responseData;
  }

The requestData is optional, I want to be able to call logData without having to specify the S type when I don't send the requestData to the method: instead of: this.logData<T, any>('GET', data), I want to call this.logData<T>('GET', data).

Is there a way to achieve this?

2
  • Maybe overload the function instead? Or maybe try using a default parameter. May 30, 2016 at 12:00
  • 2
    I don't think it's possible to overload, if I do something like private logData<T>(operation: string, responseData: T) and private logData<T, S>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData: S) I will get an duplicate function definition error
    – Marius
    May 30, 2016 at 12:04

7 Answers 7

205

As of TypeScript 2.3, you can use generic parameter defaults.

private logData<T, S = {}>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData?: S) {
  // your implementation here
}
4
  • 12
    Curious if using S = never would enforce the type get specified when the optional parameter is used. Jul 20, 2017 at 6:16
  • 3
    S = any should allow any type Aug 17, 2017 at 6:15
  • @cchamberlain Unfortunately, you can not have type definitions with this approach
    – georgekrax
    Dec 8, 2020 at 8:51
  • Don't use {} as a type. {} actually means "any non-nullish value". eslint(@typescript-eslint/ban-types)
    – Pierre C.
    Dec 30, 2021 at 14:46
79

TS Update 2020: Giving void will make the generic type optional.

type SomeType<T = void> = OtherType<T>;

The answer above where a default value as the object is given make it optional but still give value to it.


Example with default type value is {}:

type BaseFunctionType<T1, T2> = (a:T1, b:T2) => void;

type FunctionType<T = {}> = BaseFunctionType<{name: string}, T>

const someFunction:FunctionType = (a) => {

}

someFunction({ name: "Siraj" });
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
// Expected 2 arguments, but got 1.(2554)

Playground Link


Example with default generic type value is void

type BaseFunctionType<T1, T2> = (a:T1, b:T2) => void;

type FunctionType<T = void> = BaseFunctionType<{name: string}, T>

const someFunction:FunctionType = (a) => {

}

someFunction({ name: "Siraj" })

This is a good read on making generics optional.

Optional generic type in Typescript

Playground Link

4
  • If you want to have the type mandatory, but limit the types the generic can accept, you can also put <T extends MyInterface1 | MyInterface2 | MyInterface3> etc. Jun 14, 2020 at 18:10
  • Right @amphetamachine . I'm aware. 🙂
    – Siraj Alam
    Jun 15, 2020 at 6:05
  • Lovely, thanks. Where is this documented (officially)? Oct 2, 2020 at 12:32
  • @amphetamachine Unfortunately, I cannot implement it with type definitions
    – georgekrax
    Dec 8, 2020 at 8:51
24

As per TypeScript 2.2 (you can try it in the TS Playground), calling this.logData("GET", data) (with data of type T) gets inferred succesfully as this.logData<T, {}>("GET", data).

The overload suggested by David Bohunek can be applied if the inference fails with the TS version you use. Anyway, ensure that the second signature is before declared and then defined, otherwise it would not participate in the available overloads.

// Declarations
private logData<T>(operation: string, responseData: T);
private logData<T, S>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData?: S);
// Definition
private logData<T, S>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData?: S) {
    // Body
}
1
  • 5
    On TS 3.8.3, it gets inferred as unknown instead of {} Apr 1, 2020 at 22:15
8

If you're looking for an optional generic type within a Type/Interface declaration, this might help.

(came looking for this, only found answers dealing with generic function declarations. Siraj's answer got me on the right track.)

type ResponseWithMessage = {
  message: string;
};

interface ResponseWithData<T> extends ResponseWithMessage {
  data: T;
}

export type ResponseObject<T = void> = T extends void
  ? ResponseWithMessage
  : ResponseWithData<T>;
4

How about Partial?

Constructs a type with all properties of Type set to optional. This utility will return a type that represents all subsets of a given type.

0
1

You can write the overloading method like this:

private logData<T>(operation: string, responseData: T);
private logData<T, S>(operation: string, responseData: T, requestData?: S) {
    this.logger.log(operation + ' ' + this.url);
    if (requestData) {
        this.logger.log('SENT');
        this.logger.log(requestData);
    }
    this.logger.log('RECEIVED');
    this.logger.log(responseData);
    return responseData;
}

But I don't think you really need it, because you don't have to write this.logData<T, any>('GET', data) instead just write this.logData('GET', data). The T type will be infered

1
  • 1
    I'd be careful with generic and the conditional statement of this code. If the generic S is of type boolean or number it will fail to go inside the if(requireData) because the boolean value false and the number value 0 will be false. It would be more resilient to use if(requestData !== undefined). Mar 21, 2018 at 17:55
1
  • void doesn't play well where some kind of object is expected. Edit: plays perfectly well, you just have to consider the fact that void will override anything you merge it with (void & string is basically void) - this is probably the one you want
  • unknown
  • {} basically the same as unknown
interface OffsetPagination {
    offset: number;
    limit: number;
}

interface PagePagination {
    page: number;
    size: number;
}

type HttpListParams<
    PaginationType extends OffsetPagination | PagePagination | void = void,
    Params = {
        filter?: string;
    },
> = PaginationType extends void ? Params : PaginationType & Params;

ts playground

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