50

The macro println! in Rust always leaves a newline character at the end of each output. For example

println!("Enter the number : ");
io::stdin().read_line(&mut num);

gives the output

Enter the number : 
56

I don't want the user's input 56 to be on a new line. How do I do this?

0
47

You can use the print! macro instead.

print!("Enter the number : ");
io::stdin().read_line(&mut num);

Beware:

Note that stdout is frequently line-buffered by default so it may be necessary to use io::stdout().flush() to ensure the output is emitted immediately.

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    "Note that stdout is frequently line-buffered by default so it may be necessary to use io::stdout().flush() to ensure the output is emitted immediately." - doc.rust-lang.org/std/macro.print!.html – ArtemGr May 30 '16 at 20:51
  • @ArtemGr: In C++ (and C I think), when you attempt to read from stdin, the stdout buffer is immediately flushed. I would have expected (maybe wrongly) the same behavior from Rust, and the example presented on the print! page does not read from stdin so it's inconclusive in this regard... do you have more information? – Matthieu M. May 31 '16 at 7:57
  • @MatthieuM. I did a simple test on Windows and Linux with Rust nightly and there is no stdout flush happening in the answer's code, e.g. "Enter the number : " is printed only after the program ends and not before the read_line happens. – ArtemGr May 31 '16 at 9:49
  • @ArtemGr: Ouch... that's quite confusing! It may be argued it's better in a way (explicit is better than implicit) but it makes it really necessary to flush then! – Matthieu M. May 31 '16 at 11:21
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    @MatthieuM. Yeah, I like it that the standard input and output are not affecting each other in Rust. Flushing the output on input sounds like a nasty side effect to me. – ArtemGr May 31 '16 at 11:24
74

It's trickier than it would seem at first glance. Other answers mention the print! macro but it's not quite that simple. You'll likely need to flush stdout, as it may not be written to the screen immediately. flush() is a trait that is part of std::io::Write so that needs to be in scope for it to work (this is a pretty easy early mistake).

use std::io;
use std::io::Write; // <--- bring flush() into scope


fn main() {
    println!("I'm picking a number between 1 and 100...");

    print!("Enter a number: ");
    io::stdout().flush().unwrap();
    let mut val = String::new();

    io::stdin().read_line(&mut val)
        .expect("Error getting guess");

    println!("You entered {}", val);
}
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    This is the right answer! Thanks a lot for your help! – Enrique Bermúdez Mar 5 '20 at 12:37

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