31

Basically I have []int{1, 2, 3}, I want a one-liner that transforms this into the string "1, 2, 3" (I need the delimiter to be custom, sometimes ., sometimes ,, etc). Below is the best I could come up with. Searched online and did not seem to find a better answer.

In most languages there is in-built support for this, e.g.:

python:

> A = [1, 2, 3]
> ", ".join([str(a) for a in A])
'1, 2, 3'

go:

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "strconv"
)

// Could not find a one-liner that does this :(.
func arrayToString(A []int, delim string) string {

    var buffer bytes.Buffer
    for i := 0; i < len(A); i++ {
        buffer.WriteString(strconv.Itoa(A[i]))
        if i != len(A)-1 {
            buffer.WriteString(delim)
        }
    }

    return buffer.String()
}

func main() {
    A := []int{1, 2, 3}
    fmt.Println(arrayToString(A, ", "))
}

Surely there must be an utility buried into go that allows me to do this with a one-liner?

I know that there is strings.Join(A, ", "), but that only works if A is already []string.

  • 6
    There is no "I want" in Go. – Volker May 30 '16 at 20:21
  • 1
    Care to elaborate? – N0thing May 30 '16 at 22:17
  • 3
    "I want to do this {without a loop, in one line, not using a slice, with this filesystem layout, whatever}." is somehow "un-Go-ish" as Go is heavily opinionated and the complete opposite of "clever". You have to process several things: Write a loop. You want to accomplish something difficult: Write several lines of code. You want to use the go tool: Stick to the workspace conventions. – Volker May 31 '16 at 7:15
72

To convert
A := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}

to a one line delimited string like
"1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9"
use:

strings.Trim(strings.Join(strings.Fields(fmt.Sprint(A)), delim), "[]")

or:

strings.Trim(strings.Join(strings.Split(fmt.Sprint(A), " "), delim), "[]")

or:

strings.Trim(strings.Replace(fmt.Sprint(A), " ", delim, -1), "[]")

and return it from a function such as in this example:

package main

import "fmt"
import "strings"

func arrayToString(a []int, delim string) string {
    return strings.Trim(strings.Replace(fmt.Sprint(a), " ", delim, -1), "[]")
    //return strings.Trim(strings.Join(strings.Split(fmt.Sprint(a), " "), delim), "[]")
    //return strings.Trim(strings.Join(strings.Fields(fmt.Sprint(a)), delim), "[]")
}

func main() {
    A := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}

    fmt.Println(arrayToString(A, ",")) //1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
}

To include a space after the comma you could call arrayToString(A, ", ") or conversely define the return as return strings.Trim(strings.Replace(fmt.Sprint(a), " ", delim + " ", -1), "[]") to force its insertion after the delimiter.

  • 1
    Nice regression indeed from a clean and simple a.implode(',') :-/ – Lideln Kyoku Dec 17 '17 at 19:30
  • 1
    @LidelnKyoku php's implode, like python's join, allow one to do this in an easier way because they are not statically typed. I'm not sure it's easier than that in other statically typed languages – arainone May 16 '18 at 14:58
  • @arainone I wouldn't know, but IMHO it should still be (made) possible with some reduce feature or something, like so: a.reduce((ret, item) => ret + itoa(item) + ',') (to keep it simple, but not perfect) – Lideln Kyoku May 16 '18 at 20:10
  • 1
    All the proposed solutions are unnecessarily inefficient. – Inanc Gumus Dec 28 '18 at 17:01
  • 2
    @yogesh_desai If you use this function in a hot-path, you'll witness a lot of unnecessary allocations. Go is explicit and mostly one-liners are not Go style. When you bend idiomatic Go rules, it's inevitable to witness a lot of headaches later on. – Inanc Gumus Jan 10 at 13:03
16

I've just run into the same problem today, since I've not found anything on standard library, I've recompiled 3 ways to do this conversion

Create a string and appending the values from the array by converting it using strconv.Itoa:

func IntToString1() string {
    a := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
    b := ""
    for _, v := range a {
        if len(b) > 0 {
            b += ","
        }
        b += strconv.Itoa(v)
    }

    return b
}

Create a []string, convert each array value and then return a joined string from []string:

func IntToString2() string {
    a := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
    b := make([]string, len(a))
    for i, v := range a {
        b[i] = strconv.Itoa(v)
    }

    return strings.Join(b, ",")
}

Convert the []int to a string and replace / trim the value:

func IntToString3() string {
    a := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
    return strings.Trim(strings.Replace(fmt.Sprint(a), " ", ",", -1), "[]")
}

Performance is quite different depending on implementation:

BenchmarkIntToString1-12         3000000           539 ns/op
BenchmarkIntToString2-12         5000000           359 ns/op
BenchmarkIntToString3-12         1000000          1162 ns/op

Personally, I'll go with IntToString2, so the final function could be an util package in my project like this:

func SplitToString(a []int, sep string) string {
    if len(a) == 0 {
        return ""
    }

    b := make([]string, len(a))
    for i, v := range a {
        b[i] = strconv.Itoa(v)
    }
    return strings.Join(b, sep)
}
  • 1
    Thanks for including the performance analysis – Tyler Dec 5 '18 at 20:52
6

You can always json.Marshal:

data := []int{1,2,3}
s, _ := json.Marshal(data)
fmt.Println(string(s))
// output: [1, 2, 3]
  • Is it possible to make it a one-liner? – yogesh_desai Jan 10 at 10:29
4

I believe that you can go with the fmt.Sprint family of functions. I am not expert in go formatting flags, and maybe you can make it with just a Sprintf, but here's a one-liner that works:

data := []int{1,2,3}

func(x string) string { return x[6:len(x)-1]; }(fmt.Sprintf("%#v", data)) // 1, 2, 3

In general, you could use strings.Replace to come up with different separators (as long as you can safely replace the , or default separator):

// Produces 1--2--3
magic := func(s, d string) string { return strings.Replace(s[1:len(s)-1], " ", d, -1)  }
fmt.Println(magic(fmt.Sprint([]int{1, 2, 3}), "--"))

// As one liner
fmt.Println(func(s, d string) string { return strings.Replace(s[1:len(s)-1], " ", d, -1)  }(fmt.Sprint([]int{1, 2, 3}), "--"))
  • fmt.Println(fmt.Sprint(A)) yields [1 2 3] This does not allow for a custom delimiter... – N0thing May 30 '16 at 19:12
  • Precisely. Do you need exactly the "1, 2, 3" string? – AkiRoss May 30 '16 at 19:13
  • Yes, making the question statement a bit more obvious that I need to control what is in between the numbers. – N0thing May 30 '16 at 19:14

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