1

I have a dataset that is an array of hashes

[
  {:last_name=>"Smith", :first_name=>"John", :city=>"New York City", :birthdate=>"5/29/1986"},
  {:last_name=>"Bar", :first_name=>"Foo", :city=>"Chicago", :birthdate=>"5/29/1986"},
  ...
]

I want to print the values in a specific order. Currently I'm doing it this way:

def print(dataset, select_fields)
  output = ''
  dataset.each do |set|
    output += select_fields.map { |key| set[key] }.join(' ') + "\n"
  end
  puts output
end

Because I'm calling map within each I believe this is pretty slow. Maybe O(n²) slow?

Is there any way to optimize this? Using Ruby 2.2.1

1
  • You're probably obsessing over nothing here - unless this is all your app does it's very unlikely to be a bottleneck. Jun 1 '16 at 7:28
1

my print is about 30% faster on my machine. I'm pretty sure there are guys who can make it much faster than I did. In general try to iterate over a specific array once. Btw - when you are testing code, avoid any puts, because it slows your tests tremendously.

set = [
  {:last_name=>"Smith", :first_name=>"John", :city=>"New York City", :birthdate=>"5/29/1986"},
  {:last_name=>"Bar", :first_name=>"Foo", :city=>"Chicago", :birthdate=>"5/29/1986"},
]

def my_print(dataset, select_fields)  
  output = ''
  dataset.each do |set|
    select_fields.each do |sf|
      output << "#{set[sf]} "
    end
    output[-1] = "\n"
  end  
  output
end

def your_print(dataset, select_fields)
  output = ''
  dataset.each do |set|
    output += select_fields.map { |key| set[key] }.join(' ') + "\n"
  end
  output  
end

Benchmark.bm do |bm|
  bm.report do
    1_000_000.times do
      my_print(set, [:first_name, :last_name])
    end
  end
end

Benchmark.bm do |bm|
  bm.report do
    1_000_000.times do
      your_print(set, [:first_name, :last_name])
    end
  end
end
1
  • Since he wants to print it, you could already make it faster by not concatenating it into a string. Just print every line as it comes up.
    – Casper
    Jun 1 '16 at 7:26
1

As I understand the question, you could do the following.

def print(dataset, select_fields)
  dataset.each { |h,a| puts h.values_at(*select_fields).join(' ') }
end

See Hash#values_at.

2
  • No need to use each_with_object.Why not just each?
    – Casper
    Jun 1 '16 at 7:30
  • @Caspar, thanks. I've edited. each_with_object was a relic from different approach I took initially. Jun 1 '16 at 8:32

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