74

I have a quick question. I'm currently looking through https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/api/router/Router-class.html but I was wondering, in my Angular2's main.ts I have my routes defined thus:

@Routes([
    { path: '/', component: HomeComponent },
    { path: '/about-me', component: AboutMeComponent },
    { path: '/food', component: FoodComponent },
    { path: '/photos', component: PhotosComponent },
    { path: '/technology', component: TechnologyComponent },
    { path: '/blog', component:Blogomponent },
])

Now in a component elsewhere I import the Router class. In my component (or the component template) I would like to loop through all my routes defined or just be able to access them. Is there a built in way to do this? Like some function that returns an object array? Here is a crude idea of what I want...

@Component({
    selector: 'ms-navigation',
    templateUrl: 'src/navigation/navigation.template.html',
    directives: [ ROUTER_DIRECTIVES ]
})

export class NavigationComponent {
    constructor(private router:Router) {   
        // what can I do here to get an array of all my routes?
        console.log(router.routes); ????
    }
}
2
  • This user factored it out of the decorator. Jun 1, 2016 at 13:49
  • So I can access an array of the routes doing this.router.config (no browser errors), however, this throws the following typescript error in terminal ~ error TS2341: Property 'config' is private and only accessible within class 'Router'. Now if only we can debug this error or find some other clues to help us get there ...
    – TrieuNomad
    Aug 1, 2016 at 23:44

10 Answers 10

54

Here is a better version which will list all possible routes (fixed according to comments):

import { Router, Route } from "@angular/router";

constructor(private router: Router) { }

ngOnInit() {
  this.printpath('', this.router.config);
}

printpath(parent: String, config: Route[]) {
  for (let i = 0; i < config.length; i++) {
    const route = config[i];
    console.log(parent + '/' + route.path);
    if (route.children) {
      const currentPath = route.path ? parent + '/' + route.path : parent;
      this.printpath(currentPath, route.children);
    }
  }
}
5
  • This is useful but it's a little misleading. To get "all possible routes", you need to remove the && r.path in the last if statement. I had child routes which were in a module with a default empty string route which caused all the child routes to be skipped because they were nested under the empty string route. Aug 25, 2018 at 16:34
  • 2
    In Angular5, I only get the top-level routes with this one, because children are undefined. How would I get all possible routes (including children) as opposed to all loaded routes? Mar 10, 2019 at 14:27
  • 1
    Tested on Angular 9. Works okay apart from where you have lazy loaded routes (tested using the promise syntax i.e. loadChildren: () => import('./pathToModule/lazy.module').then(m => m.LazyModule)). In that case I think it would be ideal to add another condition check if ('_loadedConfig' in route) {} in which you can access child routes from route['_loadedConfig'].routes
    – rey_coder
    Oct 20, 2020 at 15:27
  • does not work @rey_coder route['_loadedConfig'] returns undefined. _loadedConfig is not part of the public API Sep 21, 2021 at 20:13
  • Yes, @THEAMAZING and I captured that in the comment....i.e it doesn't work if the route is lazy loaded. thus the 'loadedConfig' property check condition to ensure value is defined. Unlesss on your end it also doesnt work for all routes.
    – rey_coder
    Sep 27, 2021 at 22:23
42

Apparently there is a very compact way to do it:

constructor(private router: Router) {}

ngOnInit() {
  console.log('configured routes: ', this.router.config);
}
2
  • 4
    This only works module-wise. If you are having more than one module in your application, you will only get the routes according to the module you are executing the commans above. Nov 19, 2020 at 16:26
  • 1
    Doesn't work when using lazy-loading
    – Pieterjan
    May 1 at 9:12
13

If you only need the route paths as strings, you can find them by iterating over your Router object's config array.

    for (var i = 0; i < this.router.config.length; i++) {
        var routePath:string = this.router.config[i].path;
        console.log(routePath);
    }
1
  • 1
    This only shows the top level routes. Anand Rockzz's answer is much better
    – HammerNL
    Jul 3, 2018 at 8:20
10

I am using this comp. to get all routes in angular 9

import { Compiler, Component, Injector, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { Route, Router } from '@angular/router';

@Component({
  templateUrl: './sitemap.component.html'
})
export class SiteMapComponent implements OnInit {

  public urls: string[] = [];
  constructor(private _router: Router, private compiler: Compiler, private injector: Injector) {

  }

  ngOnInit() {
    this._router.config.forEach(i => {
      this.getPaths(i);
    })
  }

  getPaths(route: Route, parent: string = '') {
    if (route.redirectTo) {
      return;
    }
    if (route.children) {
      route.children.forEach(i => {
        this.getPaths(i, parent + route.path);
      });
    }
    else if (route.loadChildren) {
      (<any>this._router).configLoader.load(this.injector, route).subscribe(i => {
        i.routes.forEach(j => {
          this.getPaths(j, parent + route.path)
        });
      });
    }
    else if (route.path != null) {
      this.setPath(route.path, parent);
    }
  }
  setPath(path, parent) {
    let fullPath: string;
    if (path != null) {
      if (parent) {
        fullPath = `/${parent}/${path}`;
      }
      else {
        fullPath = `/${path}`
      }
    }
    this.urls.push(fullPath)
  }
}
7

This comes as an extension to @Anand Rockzz's answer.

Was written for Angular 6.0 and list all possible routes including the lazy ones (https://angular.io/guide/lazy-loading-ngmodules):

UPDATED

As @Daniel B mentioned:

[...] this no longer works with Angular 8.0

import { Route } from '@angular/router';
import { LoadedRouterConfig } from '@angular/router/src/config';

printPaths(parent: string, routes: Route[]) {
    const getFullPath = (path?: string) => {
        if (path) {
            return parent + '/' + path;
        }

        return parent;
    };

    for (let i = 0; i < routes.length; i++) {
        const route = routes[i];
        const fullPath = getFullPath(route.path);

        console.log(parent + '/' + route.path, route.component);

        if (route.children /*&& route.children.length > 0*/) {
            this.printPaths(fullPath, route.children);
        }

        if (route.loadChildren && route.loadChildren.length > 0) {
            var routerConfig = <LoadedRouterConfig>(<any>route)['_loadedConfig'];
            if (routerConfig) {
                this.printPaths(fullPath, routerConfig.routes);
            }
        }
    }
}
14
  • 1
    Forgot to mention that this should not be used in production. The core issue might be that the code is being minified and there will no longer be a variable called _loadedConfig. Nov 22, 2018 at 14:51
  • 1
    Just a comment to inform people that this no longer works with Angular 8.0.
    – Daniel B
    Jul 1, 2019 at 8:48
  • 3
    What are the alternatives now in Angular 8?
    – Dylan
    Aug 16, 2019 at 13:20
  • 1
    Maybe this is no longer working in Angular 8 due to the fact that LoadedRouterConfig is "moved" to an untyped file @angular/router/bundles/router.umd.js. Will update the code after I'll get a working solution. Mar 9, 2020 at 8:09
  • 1
    @AdrianPaul it's been a year, any luck?
    – adamdport
    May 10, 2021 at 12:57
3

For @angular version 2.00 I was able to find a list of the children through the routeConfig property.

Here is an example of my component. Note, I'm accessing the children via the 'parent' property as the component is actually one of the children as I'm rendering it in the child router-outlet.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import {Route, ActivatedRoute, Router} from "@angular/router";

@Component({
    selector: 'list',
    template: require('./list.component.html')
})
export class ListComponent {
    children = new Array<RouteLink>();

    constructor(private router: Router, private activatedRoute: ActivatedRoute) {
        for (let child of activatedRoute.parent.routeConfig.children) {
            if (child.path && child.data["breadcrumb"]) {
                this.children.push(new RouteLink(child.path, child.data["breadcrumb"]));
            }
        }
    }
}

export class RouteLink {
    constructor(private path: string, private name: string) {  }
}
1
  • does not work.. Sep 21, 2021 at 20:26
1

I’ve created a util function based on the answer of @OMANSAK. Tested with Angular 12 and lazy loaded modules.

import { Injector } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, Route } from '@angular/router';

const routerUrls: string[] = [];

async function getPaths(router: Router, injector: Injector, route: Route, parent: string = ''): Promise<void> {
   if (route.redirectTo) {
       return;
   }
   if (route.children) {
       for (const childRoute of route.children) {
           await getPaths(router, injector, childRoute, parent + route.path);
       }
   } else if (route.loadChildren) {
       const lazyConfig = await router['configLoader'].load(injector, route).toPromise();
       for (const childRoute of lazyConfig.routes) {
           await getPaths(router, injector, childRoute, parent + route.path);
       }
   } else if (route.path !== null) {
       if (route.path !== '') {
           routerUrls.push(parent ? `/${parent}/${route.path}` : `/${route.path}`);
       } else {
           routerUrls.push(parent ? `/${parent}` : '');
       }
   }
}

/**
 * Returns routes of the app via the Angular Router.
 *
 * Important: The fallback route in the app module (path: "**")
 * has to be the last element in your top level app-routing-module.
 *
 * @param router Angular Router
 * @param injector Angular Injector
 * @returns Routes of the app
*/
export async function getAllPaths(router: Router, injector: Injector): Promise<string[]> {
   const topLevelRoutes = router.config.slice(
       0,
       router.config.findIndex((route) => route.path === '**') ?? router.config.length - 1
   );
   for (const i of topLevelRoutes) {
       await getPaths(router, injector, i);
   }
   return routerUrls;
}
0
1

From Angular 9+, you can look at a component that has a Router injected, via the browser console:

window.ng.getComponent(document.querySelector('app-employee-overview')).router.config[0].children
0

You run into issues using this solution if you have Lazy routes. I made a simple bash command to show the routing information:

cd /path/to/app 
for r in $(find src -name "*.routes.ts"); do 
  echo $r; grep "path:\|component:\|loadChildren:" $r; 
done
2
  • Great! Now, how did you run it in your Angular app?
    – rey_coder
    Oct 20, 2020 at 14:57
  • this is a build script, not what you are looking for. @rey_coder Sep 21, 2021 at 20:15
-1

if you want to look at the available route by importing into a component.

assign your routes to a constant like below

const appRoutes: Routes = [
    {
        path: 'asd',
        component: asdComponent
    },
    {
        path: 'ar',
        component: arComponent
    }
];

export const routing = RouterModule.forRoot(appRoutes);

here you will be able to export the routes

import the const routing

import { routing }        from './app.routing';
export class AppComponent {
   route=routing;
   /// route.providers is an array which internally contains the list of routes provided
   console.log(route.providers);
}

this is just to find the available routes. not recommendable to implement logic based on this

1
  • #1 do not import appRoutes, use dependency injection with Router. Also providers is not part of the Routes. Sep 21, 2021 at 20:20

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