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I have a problem which is easier solved with a HLS tool than with writing down the raw VHDL / verilog. Currently I'm using a Xilinx Virtex-7 as I think this has been solved already by some other vendors.

I can use VHDL 2008.

So imagine in VHDL you have many calculations such as:

p1 <= a x b - c;
p2 <= p1 x d - e;
p3 <= p2 x f - g;
p4 <= p2 x p1 - p3;

Currently if I were to write this with IP Cores, it would be four DSP IP cores, and because of the different port widths, I'd have to generate this IP core 4 times. Anytime I make a change to some of these external signals, all the widths would change again. Keeping track of all this resizing is a pain, especially when resizing signed vectors down.

I have a lot of maths and thus a lot of DSP logic. It would be easier to write this block with a HLS tool. Ideally I would like it to handle the widths and bitshift the data accordingly.

Does such a tool exist? Which one would you recommend?

Bonus points:

Do any of these tools handle floating point maths and let you control precision?

  • VHDL-2008 features in Vivado 2016.1 war very basic. It's not the full feature set. – Paebbels Jun 2 '16 at 7:31
  • I'd just really like a HLS tool which resizes the number of bits signals uses than having to keep checking the code. It'd speed up productivity. – fiz Jun 2 '16 at 8:50
  • If you have used one or two HLS tools, you will notice that the productivity/design speed-up is very high for a first working result, but the generated design is horrible. Then you spend days and weeks to improve the design, which decreases your design speed-up, but improves your results... in the end you might be at the point to say: "If I had started with VHDL, I would already be finished, and the design would be much faster or use less resources." – Paebbels Jun 2 '16 at 12:21
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There are lots of ways to accomplish your goal. But first to address your points.

Currently if I were to write this with IP Cores, it would be three DSP IP cores, and because of the different port widths, I'd have to generate this IP core 3 times.

Not necessarily. If your inputs a through g are all fixed point, you can use ieee.numeric_std or in VHDL-2008 you can use ieee.fixed_pkg. These will infer DSP cores (such as the DSP48 on Xilinx). For example:

-- Assume a, b, and c are all signed integers (or implicit fixed point)
signal a : signed(7 downto 0);
signal b : signed(7 downto 0);
signal c : signed(7 downto 0);
signal p1 : signed(a'length+b'length downto 0); -- a times b produces a'length + b'length +1 (which also corresponds to (a times b) - c adding one bit).
...
p1 <= a*b - resize(c, p1'length);

This will imply multipliers and adders.

And this can be similarly done with UFIXED or SFIXED. But you do need to track the bit widths.

Also, there is a floating point package (ieee.float_pkg), but I would NOT recommend that for hardware. You are better off timing and resource-wise to implement it in fixed point.

Anytime I make a change to some of these external signals, all the widths would change again. Keeping track of all this resizing is a pain.

You can do this automatically. Look at my example above. You can easily determine widths based on the operations. Multiplications sum the number of bits. Additions add a single bit. So, if I have:

y <= a * b;

Then I can derive the length of y as simply a'length + b'length. It can be done. The issue, however, is bit growth. The chain of operations you describe will grow significantly if you keep full precision. At certain points you will need to truncate or round to reduce the number of bits. This is the hard part, it how much error you can tolerate is dependent upon the algorithm and expected data input.

I have a lot of maths and thus a lot of DSP logic. It would be easier to write this block with a HLS tool. Ideally I would like it to handle the widths and bitshift the data accordingly.

Automatic handling is the hard part. In VHDL this will not happen (nor Verilog for that matter). But you can track it fairly well and have bit widths update as necessary. But it will not automatically handle things like rounding, truncation, and managing error bounds. A DSP engineer should be handing those issues and directing the RTL developer on the appropriate widths and when to round or truncate.

Does such a tool exist? Which one would you recommend?

There are a variety of options to do this at a higher level. None of these are particularly frugal with respect to resources. Matlab has a code generation tool that will convert Matlab models (suitably constructed) into RTL. It will even analyze issues such as rounding, truncation, and determine appropriate bit widths. You can control the precision, but it is fixed point. We've played with it, and found it very far from producing efficient, high-speed code.

Alternatively, Xilinx does have an HLS suite (see Vivado). I'm not all that well versed in the methodology, but as I understand it, it allows writing C code to implement algorithms. The C doe is then "synthesized" to something that executes in some sort of execution engine. You still have to interface that C code to RTL infrastructure, and that's a challenge in its own right. The reason we have so far not pursued it heavily (even though we do DSP heavy designs) is that it is a big challenge to simulate both the HLS and RTL together as a system.

  • Thankyou for your detailed answer. "But it will not automatically handle things like rounding, truncation, and managing error bounds." And that's my problem. The maths is going to be potentially huge. I really need a tool that can handle this. Especially as when you use the resize a signed vector to a smaller size. – fiz Jun 1 '16 at 14:31
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    @fiz I do lots of DSP development, but I am not a DSP engineer. We have DSP experts help us RTL folk determine when to round and truncate. It is a two-way street. The DSP guys want full precision, we push back with timing and resource constraints. They DSP guys tell us when we can round/truncate and the reduced precision. Eventually we converge on a solution that has the precision the DSP guys want and the resource usage we can live with. It is iterative and it is complex, especially for large systems. – PlayDough Jun 1 '16 at 14:37
  • Surely though this would be brilliantly handled by some HLS tool. You input the maths, tell it to use 1 DSP per multiplier, use full precision where possible (i.e the full a / b / c widths) and it would go through and generate the code. – fiz Jun 1 '16 at 14:38
  • Another factor is processing delay. Our designs are often heavily constrained by latency. The data acquisition system feeds data very quickly and we need to process that data and make decisions before the next sample arrives. This also factors into the design. – PlayDough Jun 1 '16 at 14:39
  • Exactly. I've already briefly had a play with Vivado HLS and it gives you the ability to trade off between latency and resources. I just wanted to ask the community on their opinion if there was a "brilliant" tool for this. Thanks for the 'ieee.fixed_pkg' tip, not seen this before. – fiz Jun 1 '16 at 14:41
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In the past I found flopoco to generate arbitrary math functions in hardware. If I recall correctly, it supports many types of functions. For instance it could generate a arithmetic core to compute something like a=3*sin²(x+pi/3). For these calculations allows you to specify the overall precision of the inputs/outputs (for floating point/fixed point) or the width of the inputs ( integer ). Execution frequency and whether or not to pipeline the function can also be specified.

Here is an old tutorial I found on how to use it: tutorial

  • So for example with this package, if I said that 'a(1 downto 0)' and 'c(2 downto 0)' would it know in this calculation 'p = a x b' that the width of p is 5 bits at full precision? – fiz Jun 2 '16 at 13:48
  • It's been awhile since I worked with it. It should be able to do something like that. Check it out. – Lincoln Jun 2 '16 at 14:34
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    I looked this up and for simple integer operations only the input size is specified, so the output size calculated based on the input size. – Lincoln Jun 3 '16 at 2:03

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