8

I'm trying to get all combinations in a string in c# with that idea in mind:

Given a string like foo I want to get a List<string> with the values:

f o o
fo o
foo
f oo

As you can see it's not as easy as get all the substring but get ALL the chars in a string separated by spaces.

I've tried doing something like:

List<string> result = new List<string>();
string text = "foo";
for (int i = 1; i < foo.Lenght; i++) 
{
    //I'm stucked --> everything I think is too stupid and I don't know how to procede or not fast enough. I'm really stuck.
}

EDIT: There are some correct answers but it's clear that any of them won't do since the strings I am working with have between 55 and 85 chars each one so that means that the best function in the answers will give me something between 2^54 and 2^84 possible combinations and that is just a bit too much.

It is clear now that find all the combinations and afterwards do something with them won't do. I'll have to drop it.

5
  • No permutations required? I mean ofo is valid or invalid result? Also, what about fo, f, o, and duplicates (the second o), valid or invalid? – Khalil Khalaf Jun 1 '16 at 19:17
  • No permutations at all nor substrings are valid. The example I put there is all there is to it. – Miquel Coll Jun 1 '16 at 19:21
  • 1
    Recursive Functions. – Khalil Khalaf Jun 1 '16 at 19:22
  • yeah I know I have to do it recursive but I imagine since I had a really hard day I'm not all there and I'm pretty sure it should be easy to do with recursivity (but whenever I try I'm stuck) – Miquel Coll Jun 1 '16 at 19:23
  • 1
    True, but we dont normally just write code cos youve had a bad day.. If you had a bad day, look at it tomorrow. – BugFinder Jun 1 '16 at 19:24
5

First things first: if the string length is n, you get 2^n strings as output. So, if you want to treat strings of length 70, you have a problem.

You can use a counter, enumerating from 0 to 2^n, and treat it as a bitwise mask: if the first bit is 1, you put a space between the first and the second char, if it's zero, you don't.

So, an unsigned long of length 64 is barely enough to treat strings of length 65.

An example implementation, without recursion (it's slightly more verbose than the other examples), but should be a lot faster than the other implementations for long inputs:

    public IEnumerable<string> GetPartitionedStrings(string s)
    {
        if (s == null) yield break;

        if (s == "")
        {
            yield return "";
            yield break;
        }

        if (s.Length > 63) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("String too long...");

        var arr = s.ToCharArray();
        for(ulong i = 0, maxI = 1UL << (s.Length - 1); i < maxI; i++)
        {
            yield return PutSpaces(arr, i);
        }
    }

    public string PutSpaces(char[] arr, ulong spacesPositions)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder(arr.Length * 2);
        sb.Append(arr[0]);

        ulong l = 1;
        for (int i = 1; i < arr.Length; i++, l <<= 1)
        {
            if ((spacesPositions & l) != 0UL) sb.Append(" ");

            sb.Append(arr[i]);
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

Probably you could get away with a bit field, but we are already in the billions of strings, so I would try to reformulate a bit the problem.

1
  • Thank you fo the answer even though I had to drop it entirely. (I updated my question with what I mean) – Miquel Coll Jun 2 '16 at 11:53
5

Here is one more recursive solution to consider:

private static IEnumerable<string> Permute(string target) {
   if (target.Length <= 1) {
        yield return target;
        yield break;
    }
    var c = target[0];
    foreach (var rest in Permute(target.Remove(0, 1))) {
        yield return c + rest;
        yield return c + " " + rest;
    }
}

For your test string produces desired result. Basically we combine first char + either space or no space + the rest of the string (without first char) recursively.

To get a list, just do Permute("foo").ToList();

For "abcde" string the result is:

abcde
a bcde
ab cde
a b cde
abc de
a bc de
ab c de
a b c de
abcd e
a bcd e
ab cd e
a b cd e
abc d e
a bc d e
ab c d e
a b c d e
3

A number of answers have suggested recursive solutions, which is fine. But here's a sketch of a non-recursive solution.

  • Suppose your word has x letters where x is less than 64.
  • Compute long n = 2(x - 1)
  • Make a loop where i goes from 0 to n - 1
  • Decompose i into the (x-1) low bits.
  • Output the first letter.
  • If the first bit is set, output a space, otherwise no space.
  • Output the second letter.
  • If the second bit is set, output a space, otherwise no space.
  • And so on.

Can you implement the method given that sketch?

1
  • More or less, it's exactly my answer's algorithm. – A. Chiesa Jun 1 '16 at 20:47
3

You can do it using recursion, starting with an empty string, you call recursively adding an space and without add it, and adding current character:

static IEnumerable<string> SplitString(string s, int max)
{
    return SplitString(s, 0, max, max);
}

private static IEnumerable<string> SplitString(string s, int idx, int available, int maxLength)
{
    if (idx == s.Length) yield return string.Empty;
    else
    {
        if (available > 0)
            foreach (var item in SplitString(s, idx + 1, available - 1, maxLength))
                yield return s[idx] + item;

        if (idx > 0)
            foreach (var item in SplitString(s, idx + 1, maxLength - 1, maxLength))
                yield return " " + s[idx] + item;
    }
}

For an input like abcde, SplitString("abcde", 3) get this output:

abc de
abc d e
ab cde
ab cd e
ab c de
ab c d e
a bcd e
a bc de
a bc d e
a b cde
a b cd e
a b c de
a b c d e
1
  • I really like that approach; But I'm working in this case with string that have between 50 and 70 chars and that means A LOT of permutations. I could really speed it up if I could omit the repetitions and put a limit to the lenght of each substring (for instance; i don't need any permutation with substring wich have a lenght > 6) – Miquel Coll Jun 1 '16 at 20:04
-1

You could try something recursive. You start with a string, hello.

For each character that's not a space, if it's not followed by a space, add one at that location in the string and run the function on that string. On the first iteration, you have:

  • h ello
  • he llo
  • hel lo
  • hell o
  • hello

Repeat until all characters are followed by spaces. This will create duplicates though.

4
  • 1
    This is not an answer, this is a hint instead. – Khalil Khalaf Jun 1 '16 at 19:24
  • Sorry, I'm new to this. Is it considered an answer only if I post code? – Samuel Lapointe Jun 1 '16 at 19:26
  • Well, it is considered an answer if it completely fixes the problem that was presented in the Original Question/Post. – Khalil Khalaf Jun 1 '16 at 19:27
  • See the above answers, they show something that is direct and forward to the fix, not just guide lines or the track to the fix like I did (in the comments) and you did (here) – Khalil Khalaf Jun 1 '16 at 19:29
-2

What you could do is convert the string into a char array like this:

char characters[] = text.toCharArray()

Then in your for loop iterate through this array

for (int i = 1; i < foo.Lenght; i++) 
{
    System.out.println(characters[i]);
}
2
  • First off that just prints out each character and doesn't create a list of the original string with spaces added. Second that Java code, not C# – juharr Jun 1 '16 at 19:36
  • Hmmm you are right i didnt realize this was a c# thread. In any case he needed some direction in his code. To make his code work he could convert his string into an array and figure the rest out – user3712476 Jun 1 '16 at 19:39

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