i have the following code

elif [ $text2 == 'LANDING' ] && [ "$text4" == 'FAIL' ] || [ "$text4" == '' ]; then

the condition is that text2 should be landing and text4 can either be fail or null. How to evaluate the above command.

Please help if Im doing any wrong Thanks in advance

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to group them explicitly:

elif  [ "$text2" = 'LANDING' ] &&
      { [ "$text4" = 'FAIL' ] || [ "$text4" = '' ]; }; then

Your attempt would succeed either of the following two conditions held:

  1. text2 was LANDING and text4 was FAIL
  2. text4 was empty or unset.

Since && and || have the same precedence, you could (perhaps surprisingly) write it without grouping:

elif [ "$text4" = '' ] || [ "$text4" = FAIL ] && [ $text2 == 'LANDING' ]; then

If you are using bash, you can use the [[ ... ]] command instead of [ ... ]. The grouping is required; the operators inside [[ ... ]] do have the precedences you would expect from other languages (that is, a || b && c is a || (b && c), not (a || b) && c).

elif [[ $text2 == 'LANDING' && ( "$text4" == 'FAIL' || "$text4" == '') ]]; then

Not particular recommended, but with bash, you can use extended globbing patterns in [[...]]

elif [[ $text2 == 'LANDING' && $text4 == @(FAIL|) ]]; then

Use curly braces or parentheses to group the || operands together. Parentheses look nicer, but they create a subshell which is inefficient, so curly braces are the way to go even though they're ugly.

elif [ $text2 == 'LANDING' ] && { [ "$text4" == 'FAIL' ] || [ "$text4" == '' ]; }; then

Notice that the curly braces require an extra semicolon.

Alternatively, if you're using bash you could use double square brackets, which allow for the slightly prettier:

elif [[ $text2 == 'LANDING' && ("$text4" == 'FAIL' || "$text4" == '') ]]; then

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