89

I am using Visual Studio Code and have a fairly common project structure:

├── client/
│   ├── tsconfig.json
├── shared/
├── server/
│   ├── tsconfig.json
├── project.json

The two tsconfig files have different settings (e.g. the one under client/ targets ES5, the one under server/ targets ES6). Note that there is no tsconfig in the root directory.

The problem is that I want the shared directory to be included in both projects. I can't do this using tsconfig because the exclude option won't let me include a folder that is in a higher directory than the tsconfig.json, and using files I have to constantly keep the list of files up to date as it doesn't support globs.

Note that I can compile fine by adding the shared folder into tsc, what I want is for the Visual Studio Code IDE to recognise the shared code for intellisense etc.

Is the only option to wait for filesGlob?

4
  • Does this help? npmjs.com/package/tsconfig-glob Jun 1 '16 at 23:36
  • You can always use atom-typescript Jun 1 '16 at 23:36
  • Yea I guess I can use that package to generate the files array, but it's annoying as I'll have to have it watching the whole time to stay up-to-date. I did try atom ages ago (before VSC was released) but it was extremely slow and buggy, although perhaps it has improved since then Jun 2 '16 at 1:16
  • Atom is much better than it used to be. atom-typescript is a very nice package. Jun 2 '16 at 1:18
76

These days it is much easier as vscode has better support for this.

You can use this directory structure so all the code is independent:

├── frontend/
│   ├── src/
│   │   ├── <frontend code>
│   ├── package.json
│   ├── tsconfig.json
├── shared/
│   ├── package.json
├── backend/
│   ├── src/
│   │   ├── <backend code>
│   ├── package.json
│   ├── tsconfig.json

Then in both the backend and frontend tsconfig.json:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "paths": {
      "~shared/*": ["../shared/*"]
    },
    "rootDirs": [
      "./src",
      "../shared"
    ]
  }
}

To allow access to the shared code e.g.:

import { Foo } from '~shared/foo';

Old Answer

Use a single tsconfig.json for the root. And then extend it for each project (backend tsconfig.server.json, frontend tsconfig.webpack.json).

  • Root tsconfig.json include: ['src'] to ensure all files get typechecked in the IDE
  • Backend tsconfig.server.json exclude: ['src/app'] the frontend files
  • Frontend : tsconfig.webpack.json exclude: ['src/server'] the backend files

Folder Structure

├── src/
│   ├── app/    < Frontend
│   ├── server/ < Backend
│   ├── common/ < Shared
├── tsconfig.json
├── tsconfig.server.json
├── tsconfig.webpack.json

Config Files

tsconfig.json

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "noImplicitAny": true,
    "strictNullChecks": true
  },
  "include": [
    "src"
  ]
}

tsconfig.webpack.json

{
  "extends": "./tsconfig.json",
  "exclude": [
    "src/app"
  ]
}

tsconfig.server.json

{
  "extends": "./tsconfig.json",
  "exclude": [
    "src/server"
  ]
}

More

Example lesson

10
  • 12
    This will not work if those directories have colliding types. For example Jest and Cypress both have their own type definitions for the keyword describe, you will get a compile error due to including both types jest and cypress in the types array in the tsconfig.json. Not only that but how would VS Codes intellisense know which type definition to use. This is not the correct answer.
    – basickarl
    Oct 4 '19 at 13:32
  • 1
    How to compile using the extended config files? tsc on the root directory seems only work for the main config. Is it necessary to compile via "tsc -p childTsConfig"?
    – Mikhail
    Dec 10 '19 at 7:29
  • 5
    Attention: if you extend a tsconfig file, properties get overwritten. So for example, you can't add to include array, you must overwrite it.
    – Drarig29
    Apr 23 '20 at 21:33
  • 2
    Yes, your answer is fine, it was just an advice for future readers... I thought extending would add to arrays, but it's not the case 😌
    – Drarig29
    Apr 24 '20 at 0:12
  • 4
    This does not solve the problem VScode will use tsconfig.json and thus not use the frontend/backend specific config when editing these files. Hence VScode will display warnings when editing frontend files, as tsconfig.json doesn't include the relevant sections. Dec 17 '20 at 15:06
22

As others have mentioned, the existing answer does not solve the problem if the frontend and backend have different types - which is in nearly every case, as frontend code supports the dom whereas backend code generally does not.

Having a top level tsconfig.json would mean that dom code would show up as errors in frontend code (if dom is a lib) or that dom code would be allowed in backend code (if dom is omitted).

Here's a working solution:

Folder Structure

Our projects tend to be 'backend by default' with a specific folder for frontend code.

├── src/
│   ├── frontend/ < Frontend
│   │     ├── `tsconfig.json` (extends frontend framework defaults, eg Svelte)
│   ├── http/ < Backend
│   ├── events/ < Backend
├── tsconfig.json `tsconfig.json` (backend tsconfig)

Backend tsconfig.json

This is usually fairly minimal. We use jest for testing and the es2019 JS stdlib.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "esnext",
    "module": "commonjs",
    "outDir": "dist",
    "moduleResolution": "node",
    "esModuleInterop": true,
    "lib": ["es2019"],    
    "types": ["jest"],
  },
  "exclude": [
    "node_modules",
    "public/*",
    "src/frontend/*"
  ],
  "include": ["src/**/*"]
}

Frontend tsconfig.json

This is for Svelte but would work similarly in older frameworks. The frontend has different types because it supports .svelte files and the dom

{
  "extends": "@tsconfig/svelte/tsconfig.json",
  "compilerOptions": {
    // Default included above is es2017
    "target": "es2019",
  },
  "lib": ["es2019", "dom"],
}

Frontend specific tools

Making rollup use a separate tsconfig file:


export default {
  input: ...
  output: ...
  plugins: [
    ...
    typescript({
      tsconfig: "src/frontend/tsconfig.json",
      sourceMap: isDevelopment,
      inlineSources: isDevelopment,
    }),
    ...
  ],
   ...
};
14

I answered this here: tsconfig extension answer

The gist of the answer:

you can do this by extending your base tsconfig.json file:

tsconfig extension

just do not exclude directories in the base tsconfig.json and typescript should be able to resolve your typings for you (know this is true using node_modules/@types, or the typings module)

For example:

configs/base.json:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "noImplicitAny": true,
    "strictNullChecks": true
  }
}

tsconfig.json:

{
  "extends": "./configs/base",
  "files": [
    "main.ts",
    "supplemental.ts"
  ]
}

tsconfig.nostrictnull.json:

{
   "extends": "./tsconfig",
   "compilerOptions": {
     "strictNullChecks": false
   }
}
3
  • 10
    Hi, but how can I call the compiler from command prompt? I've been calling the base json file and is not working. The other files were ignored. Jul 11 '17 at 21:05
  • 5
    Also how IDE recognizes custom tsconfig.*.json? How can I separate tsconfig between different directories?
    – vintproykt
    May 6 '19 at 16:24
  • It's not up to the IDE to recognize multiple tsconfigs. You just pass the tsconfig you are wishing to have used to the typescript compiler via the --project (alias: -p) option. typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/compiler-options.html
    – weagle08
    May 7 '19 at 18:50
1

The new version of VSCode supports Typescript 2, add this adds support for globs in tsconfig.json with the include option. See http://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/tsconfig-json.html

1

As another variant, bind npm command with next run:

{
   'start': '...',
   'buildFront': 'tsc -p tsconfig.someName.json'
}
1
  • 1
    Why is this a -1? He is just explaining that you can select what config you would like to use specifically. Why is that wrong with the question? Sep 30 '21 at 15:47

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