11

I'm checking the configuration of my PHP server and I need to set the following parameter as follows:

error_reporting set to E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE

However on my server a numeric value is set:

error_reporting 6135 6135

I was wondering what's the meaning of it, and if I really need to change it

thanks

  • 2
    errr that title is confusing – lock Sep 21 '10 at 8:14
  • 1
    Either none of this makes any sense at all, or it's time for me to go to bed. – JAL Sep 21 '10 at 8:15
13

From the page we have:

  • E_ALL has the value 30719 in PHP 5.3.x, 6143 in PHP 5.2.x, 2047 previously

  • E_NOTICE has the value 8

Looks like you are using PHP 5.2.x

Now If you do E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE Which is bitwise complement of E_NOTICE followed by bitwise anding with E_ALL we get

6143 & (~8) = 6135
15

Values used for error reporting

 E_RECOVERABLE_ERROR  4096 +
E_USER_NOTICE        1024 +
E_USER_WARNING        512 +
E_USER_ERROR          256 +
E_COMPILE_WARNING     128 +
E_COMPILE_ERROR        64 +
E_CORE_WARNING         32 +
E_CORE_ERROR           16 +
E_PARSE                 4 +
E_WARNING               2 +
E_ERROR                 1 +
                   = 6135
  • Exactly what I was looking for, (of course) I couldn't find them in the php.net docs. Cheers! – Chris Woods Feb 7 '13 at 23:18
  • nice to have this one when seeing something like error_reporting(7) – JSmyth Sep 10 '16 at 2:55
6

The error flags are power of 2 integers so you can combine them using bit operators. The result is an integer like the one you see so if you set it to E_ALL & ~E_NOTICE it will still end up as integer. What flags comprise the 6135 value depends on your php version. You can check if a flag is contained within it using the bitwise and operator, e.g.

if ((error_reporting() & E_NOTICE) == E_NOTICE) {
    echo "E_NOTICE is active";
}
  • error_reporting() & E_NOTICE == 0 is wrong. First of all, == has a higher precedence than & so that error_reporting() & E_NOTICE == 0 is equivalent to error_reporting() & (E_NOTICE == 0). Furthermore, even if you would use (error_reporting() & E_NOTICE) == 0, it means that the expression is true if the return value of error_reporting() and the value of E_NOTICE have no bits in common. – Gumbo Sep 21 '10 at 8:35
  • ah yes. my bad. should be (error_reporting() & E_NOTICE) == E_NOTICE . thx and fixed – Raoul Duke Sep 21 '10 at 8:47
2
foreach(
    array('E_ALL', 'E_NOTICE', '~E_NOTICE', 'E_ALL&~E_NOTICE') 
    as $s) {
    eval("\$v=$s;");
    printf("%20s = dec %10u = bin %32b\n", $s, $v, $v);
}

result

           E_ALL = dec       6143 = bin                    1011111111111
        E_NOTICE = dec          8 = bin                             1000
       ~E_NOTICE = dec 4294967287 = bin 11111111111111111111111111110111
 E_ALL&~E_NOTICE = dec       6135 = bin                    1011111110111
1

Note, that error_reporting(-1); will report all and any PHP errors.

0

error_reporting 6135 will not log Runtime Notices, So better to use

error_reporting(E_ALL);

followed by

ini_set('display_errors', '0');

This will log all errors including Runtime notices, But pevent displaying in browser. This can be used in any PHP versions.

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