1

I tried assigning a signed int to unsigned int.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int a;
  unsigned int b;
  scanf("%d", &a);
  b = a;
  printf("%d %u\n", a, b);
  return 0;
}

I was hoping that compiling this would cause a warning that I am assigning an int value to unsigned int variable. But I did not get any warning.

$ gcc -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic foo.c
$ echo -1 | ./a.out
-1 4294967295

Next I tried to assigning an unsigned int to signed int.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int a;
  unsigned int b;
  scanf("%u", &b);
  a = b;
  printf("%d %u\n", a, b);
  return 0;
}

Still no warning.

$ gcc -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic bar.c
$ echo 4294967295 | ./a.out
-1 4294967295

Two questions:

  1. Why are no warnings generated in these cases even though the input gets modified during the conversions?
  2. Is a type cast necessary in either of the cases?
7

Code 1: This conversion is well-defined. If the int is out of range of unsigned int, then UINT_MAX + 1 is added to bring it in range.

Since the code is correct and normal, there should be no warning. However you could try the gcc switch -Wconversion which does produce a warning for some correct conversions, particularly signed-unsigned conversion.

Code 2: This conversion is implementation-defined if the input is larger than INT_MAX. Most likely the implementation you are on defines it to be the inverse of the conversion in Code 1.

Typically, compilers don't warn for implementation-defined code which is well-defined on that implementation. Again you can use -Wconversion.

A cast is not necessary and as a general principle, casts should be avoided as they can hide error messages.

5
  • I disagree on the last line. Casts can be used as self-documenting code, for indicating things as "yes i'm truncating the value or changing the sign, but i'm doing it on purpose". Many coding standards, such as MISRA, require casts. – atturri Jun 2 '16 at 8:20
  • @atturri disagree but it's a matter of opinion I guess. The cast could equally well indicate "I got a warning and wanted it to go away" - even though you cast, the code might still be bugged but now somebody would overlook it if they searched for potential bugs by using -Wconversion, for example. MISRA is horrible IMHO – M.M Jun 2 '16 at 8:23
  • @atturri: casts are always explicit about what they do, but cannot be self-documenting. Implicit conversions lose no more information than explicit ones. – Michael Foukarakis Jun 2 '16 at 9:09
  • @MichaelFoukarakis: int i; [...] unsigned short s = i; can be a bug. int i; [...] unsigned short s = (unsigned short)i; can also be a bug, but at least you are showing your intent, that you know what you are doing. Of course at least if you don't have the habit of using dangerous casts just to remove compiler warnings. – atturri Jun 2 '16 at 10:01
  • Almost: "then UINT_MAX is added to bring it in range." --> "then UINT_MAX + 1 is added to bring it in range." – chux - Reinstate Monica Sep 23 '16 at 4:17
5

This warning is enabled by use the -Wsign-conversion option with gcc.

-Wsign-conversion
Warn for implicit conversions that may change the sign of an integer value, like assigning a signed integer expression to an unsigned integer variable. An explicit cast silences the warning. In C, this option is enabled also by -Wconversion.

4

Signed to unsigned conversion is well defined by the standard, it is just computation modulo UINT_MAX+1. So you will never see a warning for that.

Unsigned to signed conversion is implementation defined, that is platform dependent. You'd have to look up gcc's documentation to see if and when this is considered erroneous.

And, no, a cast is never helpfull here. Its result in terms of conversion would always be the same, the only thing that you could achieve is switch off warnings, if there were any. In fact there are very few situations where cast are helpful in C, and integer to integer conversion is never among these.

1
  • "Signed to unsigned conversion ... you will never see a warning for that." -> gcc's -Wconversion will warn about that. – chux - Reinstate Monica Sep 23 '16 at 4:21
0

The authors of the C89 Standard noted that the majority of then-current compilers treated signed and unsigned integer math identically outside of a few specific cases, even when the numerical result of a computation would between INT_MAX+1u and UINT_MAX. This is one of the factors that led the rule that short unsigned types should promote to "signed int" rather than "unsigned int". While the Standard didn't require implementations to define behavior in such cases, most of them did so and there seemed to be no reason to believe that trend wouldn't continue.

Unfortunately, the authors of gcc have decided that code which needs to multiply an unsigned char by a positive signed int should be required to cast one of the operands to unsigned before doing the multiply if the result might be in the range INT_MAX+1u to UINT_MAX. If one writes

unsigned multiply(int x, unsigned char y) { return x*y; }

rather than

unsigned multiply(int x, unsigned char y) { return (unsigned)x*y; }

the compiler will usually generate code that works fine for all results up to UINT_MAX, but will sometimes generate code which malfunctions when given such values.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.