I have two text files: file1.txt and file2.txt. file1.txt is an index file, e.g. contents of file1.txt:

abc 1
def 2
ghi 3

where 'abc 1' means 1st field in table 'abc'.

file2.txt is actually dump of create table command of many tables, e.g. contents of file2.txt:

create table "def".something 
  (
    f01 char(10),
    f02 char(10),
    f03 char(10),
    f04 date
  );
create table "abc".something 
  (
    x01 char(10),
    x02 char(1),
    x03 char(10),
  );
create table "ghi".something 
  (
    z01 char(10),
    z02 intr(10),
    z03 double(10),
    z04 char(10),
    z05 char(10),
  );

I want to get a list of each nth field of table m in file.txt according to each line 'm n' in file1.txt by using only or combination of awk, grep, sed, or whatever text processing commands under Linux shell. With respect to above example, the output is expected to be:

abc,x01 char(10)
def,f02 char(10)
ghi,z03 double(10)

Is it possible and how can I do it?

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First Solution in TXR:

This solution reports the required fields as the occur in the definition file, in that file's order. This differs from the requested output which has them in the index order; that is covered in the second solution.

Another requirement not covered is the possibility that the index might have multiple entries for the same database name, extracting more than one field. This is also covered in the second solution.

Run:

$ txr reduce.txr index tbldefs
def,f02 char(10)
abc,x01 char(10)
ghi,z03 double(10)

Code in reduce.txr:

@(bind fnum @(hash :equal-based))
@(collect)
@table @field
@  (do (set [fnum table] (int-str field)))
@(end)
@(next)
@(collect)
create table "@name".something
  (
@  (line start)
@  (skip)
@  (line @(+ start [fnum name] -1))
    @line,
@(end)
@(output)
@  (repeat)
@name,@line
@  (end)
@(end)

The trick here to get the field number is to use the line directive to match the current line number right after the database header, capturing that line number into the start variable: @(start line). The @(skip) directive then skips zero or more lines of input until subsequent material matches: and that material calls for another line match, but this time with the value of the Lisp expression (+ start [fnum name] -1): the line number of the 1-based field relative to the previously captured line number in start.

TXR solutions of this type express a match for key features of the data, rather than blindly relying on fixed offsets, and minimal regular expressions. TXR minimizes the chances of obtaining a successful output on data that is garbage because the format has changed. Yet, at the same time, one has some idea about what the data looks like from the TXR program itself. It's obvious that @table @field collects space separated pairs, and that

create table "@name".something
  (

matches a specific "picture" within the data and so forth.

(By the way, this literal "something" should probably be replaced by a variable! But the sample data doesn't reveal that variance.)

Second solution in TXR:

Here, we make a small change to the index to select two fields out of abc:

$ cat index
abc 1
def 2
abc 2
ghi 3

Now the results appear in the same order as in index, and both fields out of abc are reported:

$ txr reduce2.txr index tbldefs
abc,x01 char(10)
def,f02 char(10)
abc,x02 char(1)
ghi,z03 double(10)

The code is now:

@(do
   (defvarl dblist)

   (defvarl dbhash (hash :equal-based))

   (defstruct dbfield nil
     tblname fieldno defn
     (:postinit (self)
       (push self dblist)
       (set [dbhash self] self))
     (:method equal (self) (list self.tblname self.fieldno))))
@(repeat)
@tblname @field
@  (do (new dbfield
            tblname tblname
            fieldno (int-str field)))
@(end)
@(next)
@(repeat)
create table "@tblname".@suffix
  (
@  (bind fieldno 0)
@  (repeat)
    @defn,
@    (do (whenlet ((dbrec [dbhash (list tblname (inc fieldno))]))
           (set dbrec.defn defn)))
@  (until)
  );
@  (end)
@(end)
@(output)
@  (repeat :vars ((dbf (keep-if (usl defn) (reverse dblist)))))
@{dbf.tblname},@{dbf.defn}
@  (end)
@(end)

A data structure is used with a little bit of OOP. When the first file is scanned it turns the pairs into structure objects of type dbfield using the new macro operator. These objects have a table name and an integer record number. They also have a definition (defn slot) which is left at the default value nil. When newly created, their :postinit handler adds them to a the global list dblist, and adds each one into the global hash dbhash. The equal method ensures that for the purposes of equal equality, the records are reduced to two-element lists consisting of a table name and field number. This is what the hash table is effectively indexed on, then.

When we process the second file, we use the database name and running counter to see whether a dbfield structure exists for that key in dbhash. If so, we update that records defn with the extracted definition.

In the @(output) section, we instruct repeat to iterate over the dblist, but in reverse (since the entries of the first file were pushed onto it, like a stack). We also filter this list only for those entries that have a defn slot that isn't nil. That is to say, the index file can reference nonexistent databases and fields. The requirements could be extended to report these somehow or raise an error.

Here is your script :

while read line
       do set $line  
       i=$(($2+1)) 
       echo "$1,`grep -A$i "$1" file2.txt | tail -1`"
done < file1.txt 

The current output has leading whitespaces and a trailing comma in the second column. You can remove them using sed which I left for you as homework.

The script works as follows :

  • Read file1 line by line
  • Use set to split the line into fields
  • Increment $2, this is required due to the presence of ( after each every create line
  • Find pattern $1 in the second file with context defined by $2
  • Append the grep output to $1 & ,

You can write an awk script as

awk -F'[ "]' '
    FNR==NR{file1[$1] = $2; next}
    $4 in file1{counter = file1[$4] + 1; table = $4}; 
    !counter{print table,$0} 
'

Test

$ awk -F'[ \"]' 'FNR==NR{file1[$1] = $2; next} $4 in file1{counter = file1[$4] + 1; table = $4}; !counter--{print table,$0} ' file1 file2
def     f02 char(10),
abc     x01 char(10),
ghi     z03 double(10),
  • 1
    Why not use single quotes to define the field sep, so you don't have to escape ? – 123 Jun 2 '16 at 13:34
  • @123 Good point. Updated in answer. – nu11p01n73R Jun 2 '16 at 16:25

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