How to convert byte size into human-readable format in Java? Like 1024 should become "1 Kb" and 1024*1024 should become "1 Mb".

I am kind of sick of writing this utility method for each project. Are there any static methods in Apache Commons for this?

20 Answers 20

up vote 1133 down vote accepted

Here is my go at it (no loops and handles both SI units and binary units):

public static String humanReadableByteCount(long bytes, boolean si) {
    int unit = si ? 1000 : 1024;
    if (bytes < unit) return bytes + " B";
    int exp = (int) (Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(unit));
    String pre = (si ? "kMGTPE" : "KMGTPE").charAt(exp-1) + (si ? "" : "i");
    return String.format("%.1f %sB", bytes / Math.pow(unit, exp), pre);
}

Example output:

                              SI     BINARY

                   0:        0 B        0 B
                  27:       27 B       27 B
                 999:      999 B      999 B
                1000:     1.0 kB     1000 B
                1023:     1.0 kB     1023 B
                1024:     1.0 kB    1.0 KiB
                1728:     1.7 kB    1.7 KiB
              110592:   110.6 kB  108.0 KiB
             7077888:     7.1 MB    6.8 MiB
           452984832:   453.0 MB  432.0 MiB
         28991029248:    29.0 GB   27.0 GiB
       1855425871872:     1.9 TB    1.7 TiB
 9223372036854775807:     9.2 EB    8.0 EiB   (Long.MAX_VALUE)

Related article: Java: Formatting byte size to human readable format

  • 12
    I prefer 1.0 KB. Then it's clear how many significant figures the output entails. (This also seems to be the behavior of for instance the du command in Linux.) – aioobe Sep 21 '10 at 14:48
  • 17
    I think every one should note that in your project customer want see values in base 2 (devided by 1024) but with common prefix. Not KiB, MiB, GiB etc. Use KB, MB, GB, TB for it. – Borys May 23 '13 at 13:33
  • 5
    @Mazyod For iOS developers, you can use NSByteCountFormatter. For example (in swift): let bytes = 110592 NSByteCountFormatter.stringFromByteCount(Int64(bytes), countStyle: NSByteCountFormatterCountStyle.File) would produce "111 KB" – duthen Aug 13 '15 at 12:39
  • 17
    @Borys Using "KB" to mean "1024 bytes" is wrong. Don't do that. – endolith Dec 7 '15 at 16:34
  • 7
    Readers will learn it. Better something they are unfamiliar with and can learn it than having something wrong. Writing KB a user who is familiar with it will expect 1000 and a user who is unfamiliar will expect 1024. – kap Apr 19 '16 at 12:35

FileUtils.byteCountToDisplaySize(long size) would work if your project can depend on org.apache.commons.io.

JavaDoc for this method

  • 14
    I already have commons-io on my project, but ended up using aioobe's code, because of the rounding behavior (see the link for JavaDoc) – Iravanchi Jul 9 '12 at 12:31
  • 3
    stackoverflow.com/a/26502430/185022 without any dependency Android Native – AZ_ Jan 20 '15 at 6:42
  • 3
    is there a utility to do the reverse operation. Getting byte count from human readable byte count? – arunmoezhi Jun 24 '15 at 19:02
  • 6
    Unfortunately this function is not locale-aware; in French, for example, they always call bytes "octets" so if you're going to display a 100 KB file to a French user the correct label would be 100 Ko. – Tacroy Dec 17 '15 at 15:26
  • 1
    this rounds to the nearest gb when > 1 gb, which means that the precision you get out of it varies – tksfz Oct 17 '17 at 17:55

Use Android builtin Class

For Android there is a class Formatter. Just one like of code and you are done.

android.text.format.Formatter.formatShortFileSize(activityContext, bytes);

It is Like formatFileSize(), but trying to generate shorter numbers (showing fewer decimals).

android.text.format.Formatter.formatFileSize(activityContext, bytes);

Formats a content size to be in the form of bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, etc.

  • 7
    should be the best answer for ANDROID definitively. No extra libraries needed. +1 – dit Apr 19 '15 at 11:37
  • 6
    I hate the fact you have to pass in Context. – Jared Burrows May 25 '15 at 3:50
  • 1
    @zionpi very innocent question.. Magic :P read documentation :) – AZ_ Jun 1 '15 at 6:25
  • 3
    Should be the best answer for ANDROID definitively. – shridutt kothari Oct 25 '15 at 17:24
  • 4
    You pass in Context so it's translated to the user's current Locale. Otherwise it wouldn't be a very useful function. – phreakhead May 13 '16 at 22:37

We can completely avoid using the slow Math.pow() and Math.log() methods without sacrificing simplicity since the factor between the units (e.g. B, KB, MB etc.) is 1024 which is 2^10. The Long class has a handy numberOfLeadingZeros() method which we can use to tell which unit the size value falls in.

Key point: Size units have a distance of 10 bits (1024=2^10) meaning the position of the highest 1 bit - or in other words the number of leading zeros - differ by 10 (Bytes=KB*1024, KB=MB*1024 etc.).

Correlation between number of leading zeros and size unit:

# of leading 0's   Size unit
-------------------------------
>53                B (Bytes)
>43                KB
>33                MB
>23                GB
>13                TB
>3                 PB
<=2                EB

The final code:

public static String formatSize(long v) {
    if (v < 1024) return v + " B";
    int z = (63 - Long.numberOfLeadingZeros(v)) / 10;
    return String.format("%.1f %sB", (double)v / (1L << (z*10)), " KMGTPE".charAt(z));
}

I asked the same Question recently:

Format file size as MB, GB etc

While there is no out-of-the-box answer, I can live with the solution:

private static final long K = 1024;
private static final long M = K * K;
private static final long G = M * K;
private static final long T = G * K;

public static String convertToStringRepresentation(final long value){
    final long[] dividers = new long[] { T, G, M, K, 1 };
    final String[] units = new String[] { "TB", "GB", "MB", "KB", "B" };
    if(value < 1)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid file size: " + value);
    String result = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < dividers.length; i++){
        final long divider = dividers[i];
        if(value >= divider){
            result = format(value, divider, units[i]);
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private static String format(final long value,
    final long divider,
    final String unit){
    final double result =
        divider > 1 ? (double) value / (double) divider : (double) value;
    return new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(result) + " " + unit;
}

Test code:

public static void main(final String[] args){
    final long[] l = new long[] { 1l, 4343l, 43434334l, 3563543743l };
    for(final long ll : l){
        System.out.println(convertToStringRepresentation(ll));
    }
}

Output (on my German Locale):

1 B
4,2 KB
41,4 MB
3,3 GB

Edit: I have opened an Issue requesting this functionality for Google Guava. Perhaps someone would care to support it.

  • 2
    Why is 0 an invalid file-size? – aioobe Sep 21 '10 at 9:29
  • @aioobe it was in my use case (displaying the size of an uploaded file), but arguably that's not universal – Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 21 '10 at 9:38
  • If you change the last line to return NumberFormat.getFormat("#,##0.#").format(result) + " " + unit; it works in GWT too! Thanks for this, it's still not in Guava. – tom Oct 24 '13 at 12:30

This is a modified version of aioobe's answer.

Changes:

  • Locale parameter, because some languages use . and others , as decimal point.
  • human-readable code

private static final String[] SI_UNITS = { "B", "kB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB" };
private static final String[] BINARY_UNITS = { "B", "KiB", "MiB", "GiB", "TiB", "PiB", "EiB" };

public static String humanReadableByteCount(final long bytes, final boolean useSIUnits, final Locale locale)
{
    final String[] units = useSIUnits ? SI_UNITS : BINARY_UNITS;
    final int base = useSIUnits ? 1000 : 1024;

    // When using the smallest unit no decimal point is needed, because it's the exact number.
    if (bytes < base) {
        return bytes + " " + units[0];
    }

    final int exponent = (int) (Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(base));
    final String unit = units[exponent];
    return String.format(locale, "%.1f %s", bytes / Math.pow(base, exponent), unit);
}

If you use Android, you can simply use Formatter.formatFileSize() .

Alternativey, here's a solution based on this popular post :

  /**
   * formats the bytes to a human readable format
   *
   * @param si true if each kilo==1000, false if kilo==1024
   */
  @SuppressLint("DefaultLocale")
  public static String humanReadableByteCount(final long bytes,final boolean si)
    {
    final int unit=si ? 1000 : 1024;
    if(bytes<unit)
      return bytes+" B";
    double result=bytes;
    final String unitsToUse=(si ? "k" : "K")+"MGTPE";
    int i=0;
    final int unitsCount=unitsToUse.length();
    while(true)
      {
      result/=unit;
      if(result<unit)
        break;
      // check if we can go further:
      if(i==unitsCount-1)
        break;
      ++i;
      }
    final StringBuilder sb=new StringBuilder(9);
    sb.append(String.format("%.1f ",result));
    sb.append(unitsToUse.charAt(i));
    if(si)
      sb.append('B');
    else sb.append('i').append('B');
    final String resultStr=sb.toString();
    return resultStr;
    }
  • You seem to have an off-by-one error in your for-loop. I think it should be unitsCount and not unitsCount-1. – aioobe May 5 '14 at 12:02
  • @aioobe but this means the loop can stop when i==unitsCount, which means i==6, which means "charAt" will fail... – android developer May 5 '14 at 12:30
  • if(result<unit) break; will kick in before that. No worries. (If you test it, you'll notice that you can skip the for-loop condition entirely.) – aioobe May 5 '14 at 12:54
  • @aioobe Correct, that's because of the assumption (which is correct) that I handle "long" variable type. Also, it's based on the assumption that the units will be at least what I've written. If you use less units, it will produce weird results (will prefer less-than-1 values, rather than larger-than-1000 values). – android developer May 5 '14 at 13:39
  • Right, but as it stands now, it is seriously flawed. – aioobe May 6 '14 at 8:00

private static final String[] Q = new String[]{"", "K", "M", "G", "T", "P", "E"};

public String getAsString(long bytes)
{
    for (int i = 6; i > 0; i--)
    {
        double step = Math.pow(1024, i);
        if (bytes > step) return String.format("%3.1f %s", bytes / step, Q[i]);
    }
    return Long.toString(bytes);
}
    public static String floatForm (double d)
    {
       return new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(d);
    }


    public static String bytesToHuman (long size)
    {
        long Kb = 1  * 1024;
        long Mb = Kb * 1024;
        long Gb = Mb * 1024;
        long Tb = Gb * 1024;
        long Pb = Tb * 1024;
        long Eb = Pb * 1024;

        if (size <  Kb)                 return floatForm(        size     ) + " byte";
        if (size >= Kb && size < Mb)    return floatForm((double)size / Kb) + " Kb";
        if (size >= Mb && size < Gb)    return floatForm((double)size / Mb) + " Mb";
        if (size >= Gb && size < Tb)    return floatForm((double)size / Gb) + " Gb";
        if (size >= Tb && size < Pb)    return floatForm((double)size / Tb) + " Tb";
        if (size >= Pb && size < Eb)    return floatForm((double)size / Pb) + " Pb";
        if (size >= Eb)                 return floatForm((double)size / Eb) + " Eb";

        return "???";
    }
  private String bytesIntoHumanReadable(long bytes) {
        long kilobyte = 1024;
        long megabyte = kilobyte * 1024;
        long gigabyte = megabyte * 1024;
        long terabyte = gigabyte * 1024;

        if ((bytes >= 0) && (bytes < kilobyte)) {
            return bytes + " B";

        } else if ((bytes >= kilobyte) && (bytes < megabyte)) {
            return (bytes / kilobyte) + " KB";

        } else if ((bytes >= megabyte) && (bytes < gigabyte)) {
            return (bytes / megabyte) + " MB";

        } else if ((bytes >= gigabyte) && (bytes < terabyte)) {
            return (bytes / gigabyte) + " GB";

        } else if (bytes >= terabyte) {
            return (bytes / terabyte) + " TB";

        } else {
            return bytes + " Bytes";
        }
    }
  • I like this because it's easy to follow and easy to understand. – Joshua Pinter Feb 27 at 17:33

There is now one library available that contains unit formatting. I added it to the triava library, as the only other existing library seems to be one for Android.

It can format numbers with arbitrary precision, in 3 different systems (SI, IEC, JEDEC) and various output options. Here are some code examples from the triava unit tests:

UnitFormatter.formatAsUnit(1126, UnitSystem.SI, "B");
// = "1.13kB"
UnitFormatter.formatAsUnit(2094, UnitSystem.IEC, "B");
// = "2.04KiB"

Printing exact kilo, mega values (here with W = Watt):

UnitFormatter.formatAsUnits(12_000_678, UnitSystem.SI, "W", ", ");
// = "12MW, 678W"

You can pass a DecimalFormat to customize the output:

UnitFormatter.formatAsUnit(2085, UnitSystem.IEC, "B", new DecimalFormat("0.0000"));
// = "2.0361KiB"

For arbitrary operations on kilo or mega values, you can split them into components:

UnitComponent uc = new  UnitComponent(123_345_567_789L, UnitSystem.SI);
int kilos = uc.kilo(); // 567
int gigas = uc.giga(); // 123

Byte Units allows you to do it like this:

long input1 = 1024;
long input2 = 1024 * 1024;

Assert.assertEquals("1 KiB", BinaryByteUnit.format(input1));
Assert.assertEquals("1 MiB", BinaryByteUnit.format(input2));

Assert.assertEquals("1.024 KB", DecimalByteUnit.format(input1, "#.0"));
Assert.assertEquals("1.049 MB", DecimalByteUnit.format(input2, "#.000"));

NumberFormat format = new DecimalFormat("#.#");
Assert.assertEquals("1 KiB", BinaryByteUnit.format(input1, format));
Assert.assertEquals("1 MiB", BinaryByteUnit.format(input2, format));

I have written another library called storage-units that allows you to do it like this:

String formattedUnit1 = StorageUnits.formatAsCommonUnit(input1, "#");
String formattedUnit2 = StorageUnits.formatAsCommonUnit(input2, "#");
String formattedUnit3 = StorageUnits.formatAsBinaryUnit(input1);
String formattedUnit4 = StorageUnits.formatAsBinaryUnit(input2);
String formattedUnit5 = StorageUnits.formatAsDecimalUnit(input1, "#.00", Locale.GERMAN);
String formattedUnit6 = StorageUnits.formatAsDecimalUnit(input2, "#.00", Locale.GERMAN);
String formattedUnit7 = StorageUnits.formatAsBinaryUnit(input1, format);
String formattedUnit8 = StorageUnits.formatAsBinaryUnit(input2, format);

Assert.assertEquals("1 kB", formattedUnit1);
Assert.assertEquals("1 MB", formattedUnit2);
Assert.assertEquals("1.00 KiB", formattedUnit3);
Assert.assertEquals("1.00 MiB", formattedUnit4);
Assert.assertEquals("1,02 kB", formattedUnit5);
Assert.assertEquals("1,05 MB", formattedUnit6);
Assert.assertEquals("1 KiB", formattedUnit7);
Assert.assertEquals("1 MiB", formattedUnit8);

In case you want to force a certain unit, do this:

String formattedUnit9 = StorageUnits.formatAsKibibyte(input2);
String formattedUnit10 = StorageUnits.formatAsCommonMegabyte(input2);

Assert.assertEquals("1024.00 KiB", formattedUnit9);
Assert.assertEquals("1.00 MB", formattedUnit10);
  • You must disclose your affiliation with this library. I have edited your post to do that. – Ed Cottrell Aug 17 '16 at 18:28
  • Yep thanks! Edited myself in order to add an example for byte units as well – Sebastian Hoß Aug 17 '16 at 20:03

I know it's too late to update this post! but I had some fun with this:

Create an interface:

public interface IUnits {
     public String format(long size, String pattern);
     public long getUnitSize();
}

Create StorageUnits class:

import java.text.DecimalFormat;

public class StorageUnits {
private static final long K = 1024;
private static final long M = K * K;
private static final long G = M * K;
private static final long T = G * K;

enum Unit implements IUnits {
    TERA_BYTE {
        @Override
        public String format(long size, String pattern) {
            return format(size, getUnitSize(), "TB", pattern);
        }
        @Override
        public long getUnitSize() {
            return T;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Terabytes";
        }
    },
    GIGA_BYTE {
        @Override
        public String format(long size, String pattern) {
            return format(size, getUnitSize(), "GB", pattern);
        }
        @Override
        public long getUnitSize() {
            return G;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Gigabytes";
        }
    },
    MEGA_BYTE {
        @Override
        public String format(long size, String pattern) {
            return format(size, getUnitSize(), "MB", pattern);
        }
        @Override
        public long getUnitSize() {
            return M;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Megabytes";
        }
    },
    KILO_BYTE {
        @Override
        public String format(long size, String pattern) {
            return format(size, getUnitSize(), "kB", pattern);
        }
        @Override
        public long getUnitSize() {
            return K;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Kilobytes";
        }

    };
    String format(long size, long base, String unit, String pattern) {
        return new DecimalFormat(pattern).format(
                Long.valueOf(size).doubleValue() / Long.valueOf(base).doubleValue()
        ) + unit;
    }
}

public static String format(long size, String pattern) {
    for(Unit unit : Unit.values()) {
        if(size >= unit.getUnitSize()) {
            return unit.format(size, pattern);
        }
    }
    return ("???(" + size + ")???");
}

public static String format(long size) {
    return format(size, "#,##0.#");
}
}

Call it:

class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) {
         System.out.println(StorageUnits.format(21885));
         System.out.println(StorageUnits.format(2188121545L));
    }
}

Output:

21.4kB
2GB
String[] fileSizeUnits = {"bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB", "ZB", "YB"};
public String calculateProperFileSize(double bytes){
    String sizeToReturn = "";
    int index = 0;
    for(index = 0; index < fileSizeUnits.length; index++){
        if(bytes < 1024){
            break;
        }
        bytes = bytes / 1024;
    }

Just add more file units (if any missing), and you will see unit size upto that unit (if your file has that much length) System.out.println("File size in proper format: " + bytes + " " + fileSizeUnits[index]); sizeToReturn = String.valueOf(bytes) + " " + fileSizeUnits[index]; return sizeToReturn; }

Here's the C# .net equivalent for Java correct consensus answer above. (there's another below which have shorter codes)

    public static String BytesNumberToHumanReadableString(long bytes, bool SI1000orBinary1024)
    {

        int unit = SI1000orBinary1024 ? 1000 : 1024;
        if (bytes < unit) return bytes + " B";
        int exp = (int)(Math.Log(bytes) / Math.Log(unit));
        String pre = (SI1000orBinary1024 ? "kMGTPE" : "KMGTPE")[(exp - 1)] + (SI1000orBinary1024 ? "" : "i");
        return String.Format("{0:F1} {1}B", bytes / Math.Pow(unit, exp), pre);
    }

Technically speaking, if we stick to SI units, this routine works for any regular use of numbers. There are many other good answers from experts. Suppose you are doing databinding of numbers on gridviews, its worth to check out performance optimized routines from them.

PS: Posted because this question/answer came up on top on google search while I am doing C# project.

In the off-chance it saves someone a bit of time, or maybe just for a bit of fun, here's a Go version. For simplicity, I've only included the binary output case.

func sizeOf(bytes int64) string {
    const unit = 1024
    if bytes < unit {
        return fmt.Sprintf("%d B", bytes)
    }

    fb := float64(bytes)
    exp := int(math.Log(fb) / math.Log(unit))
    pre := "KMGTPE"[exp-1]
    div := math.Pow(unit, float64(exp))
    return fmt.Sprintf("%.1f %ciB", fb / div, pre)
}
  • Credit to aioobe for the algorithm - see above. – Rick-777 Oct 4 at 15:23
filename=filedilg.getSelectedFile().getAbsolutePath();
File file=new File(filename);

String disp=FileUtils.byteCountToDisplaySize(file.length());
System.out.println("THE FILE PATH IS "+file+"THIS File SIZE IS IN MB "+disp);

Have you tried JSR 363? Its unit extension modules like Unicode CLDR (in GitHub: uom-systems) do all that for you.

You can use MetricPrefix included in every implementation or BinaryPrefix (comparable to some of the examples above) and if you e.g. live and work in India or a nearby country, IndianPrefix (also in the common module of uom-systems) allows you to use and format "Crore Bytes" or "Lakh Bytes", too.

You can use StringUtils’s TraditionalBinarPrefix:

public static String humanReadableInt(long number) {
    return TraditionalBinaryPrefix.long2String(number,””,1);
}

Maybe you can use this code(in C#):

        long Kb = 1024;
        long Mb = Kb * 1024;
        long Gb = Mb * 1024;
        long Tb = Gb * 1024;
        long Pb = Tb * 1024;
        long Eb = Pb * 1024;

        if (size < Kb) return size.ToString() + " byte";
        if (size < Mb) return (size / Kb).ToString("###.##") + " Kb.";
        if (size < Gb) return (size / Mb).ToString("###.##") + " Mb.";
        if (size < Tb) return (size / Gb).ToString("###.##") + " Gb.";
        if (size < Pb) return (size / Tb).ToString("###.##") + " Tb.";
        if (size < Eb) return (size / Pb).ToString("###.##") + " Pb.";
        if (size >= Eb) return (size / Eb).ToString("###.##") + " Eb.";

        return "invalid size";

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