56

I'm trying to get output value from DB via ADO.net. There's a client code:

    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
    {
        connection.Open();
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("pDoSomethingParamsRes", connection);
        command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        command.Parameters.Add("@i", 1);
        var outParam = new SqlParameter("@out", SqlDbType.VarChar);
        outParam.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;
        command.Parameters.Add(outParam);
        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
        Console.WriteLine(command.Parameters["@out"].Value.ToString());
    }

When I run this I get the following exception:

the Size property has an invalid size of 0

According to manual SqlParameter.Size Property I might omit size. Why do I get this exception? How to make it work without passing size?
Thank you for your help!

  • Why you want to avoid setting the Size property... – The King Sep 21 '10 at 10:20
59

VarChar and NVarChar are variable width character fields (thus var+char). You have to set the length, otherwise the default is zero.

  • What if I supply the size = 1000 for int? Will I get an exception? – StuffHappens Sep 21 '10 at 10:20
  • @StuffHappens - The varchar and NVarchar always adjust to the data length no matter what size you give. So you can set any size (MAX 4000 for Nvarchar and 8000 for varchar). It wont hurt. – Sachin Shanbhag Sep 21 '10 at 10:22
  • 2
    Just to add that if you assign a value to the parameter, the size of that value will be used as the default instead of 0 (i.e. you can omit the size). – AdaTheDev Sep 21 '10 at 10:22
47

Parameter Size is required for variable size Output parameters. Generally ADO.NET decides the size of the parameter based on the Value assigned to the parameter (hence it is optional), but in output parameter since no value is Set, you need provide the size required for the parameter

Set the Parameter size to size of the output variable from the DB... Say 50

outParam.Size = 50;
  • It helps. But I don't want to pass any size (I have certain reasons for it). – StuffHappens Sep 21 '10 at 10:17
  • If you want to avoid size then all I could think of is to get the result as DataTable / DataSet. But this requires you to change the SP. – The King Sep 21 '10 at 10:23
15

Incidentally, setting the size property of an output parameter is necessary even if it isn't a string-type parameter. For example, if you are using a System.Data.SqlDbType.Int, you should set the size to be 4.

  • 2
    +100 points for being the only one to point out that even non-string type output parameters need a size specified. If using the SqlParameter(name, value) constructor with a null valued int?, the system will infer a size of 0 not a 4 (like I was expecting). – Arkaine55 Mar 9 '15 at 3:56
  • 2
    Bingo. That was my issue. For me, however, setting the SqlDbType was sufficient. My guess is that the Sql library infers the size from the type in that case. – Andy V Mar 30 '16 at 16:20
9

Check MSDN : SqlParameter.Size Property

For bidirectional and output parameters, and return values, you must set the value of Size. This is not required for input parameters, and if not explicitly set, the value is inferred from the actual size of the specified parameter when a parameterized statement is executed.

4

Everyone's answer was about as clear as mud to me. Maybe this will help someone now that I found what worked.

Need to add size to the parameter

        DynamicParameters Params = new DynamicParameters();
        Params.Add("@ProfileID", ProfileID);
        Params.Add("@CategoryName", CategoryName);
        Params.Add("@Added", dbType: DbType.String, direction: ParameterDirection.Output,size:10);

        db.Execute(sql, Params, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure, commandTimeout: 60);

        var Added = Params.Get<string>("@Added");
1

I'm not sure if this is the same problem i've had before, but using a byte for a parameter can sometimes lead to this error.

Try this. Explicitly declare the i parameter as a variable. THEN assign it's value with the Value property.

0

Also, you can get the actual size of the parameters by inspecting the sproc with this little command:

SqlCommandBuilder.DeriveParameters(yourCommand)

and then just foreach your way through the parameters collection.

0

I had this error occur, supplying a value that had a non-string, but nullable, type. In my case, an int?. I fixed it by passing in a non-nullable int instead.

0

you have to set Size for parameter output

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
{
    connection.Open();
    SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("pDoSomethingParamsRes", connection);
    command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    command.Parameters.Add("@i", 1);
    var outParam = new SqlParameter("@out", SqlDbType.VarChar);
    outParam.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;
    outParam.Size = 50; // this is example
    command.Parameters.Add(outParam);
    command.ExecuteNonQuery();
    Console.WriteLine(command.Parameters["@out"].Value.ToString());
}

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