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I'm working with a legacy codebase here that currently uses OLD_PASSWORD() as a simple hashing function. This codebase now needs to connect to a database running the newest revision of MySQL 5.7.

The equivalent of PASSWORD() seems to be: UPPER(SHA1(UNHEX(SHA1(password)))).

Is there a similar equivalent to OLD_PASSWORD()?

  • Using OLD_PASSWORD() for user authentication is a terrible idea, so if you can replace this with something actually secure you'd be in much better shape. Is OLD_PASSWORD() just unsalted MD5? You could do tests to find out. If it is, it's utterly useless in terms of protection. – tadman Jun 2 '16 at 15:46
  • I'm very aware it's not secure. As I said this is a legacy codebase. It's currently out of my control to change. OLD_PASSWORD() appears to return a halved MD5 string (16 chars), but isn't actually. – Chris Bornhoft Jun 2 '16 at 15:52
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    I found A python implementation of the old MySQL PASSWORD() function. I can't speak a word of Python but the algorithm looks ridiculous. – Álvaro González Jun 2 '16 at 16:03
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    Forcing people to update their passwords once every two decades is not necessarily a bad idea. – tadman Jun 2 '16 at 16:26
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    @DanFromGermany Yep, it's removed as of version 5.7.5. If Google Cloud SQL offered MariaDB we would choose it for sure. – Chris Bornhoft Jun 3 '16 at 13:27
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It appears there is no equivalent to OLD_PASSWORD() using MySQL functions except if the server allows globals to be set. By executing the query SET @@global.old_passwords = 1;, as a user with super permissions, the PASSWORD() function then hashes passwords using the OLD_PASSWORD() algorithm.

If, like in our case above, you do not have a super user (Google CloudSQL does not support them), then a replacement algorithm is needed. Below are replacements for different languages:

C | Perl | PHP | Python | SQL

Disclaimer: MySQL's password functions are a joke in modern day security and should not be used if at all possible. In addition, I'm not responsible for any head asploding after taking a look at the algorithms above!

  • After taking over a legacy system, that was recently upgraded without fixing the passwords, and the actual system users were hashed using PASSWORD() function, I found these scripts quite helpful. I have now managed to integrate them in my upgrade method and am now updating to the new SHA1 hashed after successful authentication with PASSWORD(). – SollyM Mar 13 '18 at 8:18
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I tried to write a replace-user-defined function for OLD_PASSWORD directly in SQL and it seems it's working. The code is a translation of the PHP version found in this post.

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS OLD_PASSWORD;
DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION OLD_PASSWORD (input CHAR(250)) 
RETURNS CHAR(16)
DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN 
  DECLARE nr BIGINT;
  DECLARE nr2 BIGINT;
  DECLARE ad BIGINT;
  DECLARE inlen INT;
  DECLARE i INT;
  DECLARE b CHAR;
  DECLARE tmp INT;
  DECLARE output CHAR(16);

  SET nr = 1345345333;
  SET nr2 = 0x12345671;
  SET ad = 7;
  SET inlen = LENGTH(input);
  SET i = 1;

  WHILE i <= inlen DO
    SET b = MID(input, i, 1);
    IF b != ' ' AND b != '\t' THEN
      SET tmp = ORD(b);
      SET nr = nr ^ ((((nr & 63) + ad) * tmp) + ((nr << 8) & 0xFFFFFFFF));
      SET nr2 = nr2 + (((nr2 << 8) & 0xFFFFFFFF) ^ nr);
      SET ad = ad + tmp;
    END IF;
    SET i = i + 1;
  END WHILE;

  SET nr  = nr  & ((1 << 31) - 1);
  SET nr2 = nr2 & ((1 << 31) - 1);      
  SET output = LOWER(CONCAT(HEX(nr), HEX(nr2)));

  RETURN output;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

Hope this could help. But pay attantion: it's not safe to keep passwords in this format.

  • Looks good! I've added it to the list in the answer above. – Chris Bornhoft Oct 25 '18 at 13:39
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max's answer is great, except that it sometimes fails.

For instance, when the input string is 'my', the return value is a string of length 15 instead of 16. This is because the return value's initial character is 0. Just try

select old_password('my'); 

to confirm this.

The remedy is to apply the lpad() function to hex(nr) and hex(nr2) -- the following line

SET output = LOWER(CONCAT(HEX(nr), HEX(nr2)));

should be changed to

SET output = LOWER(CONCAT(LPAD(HEX(nr),8,'0'), LPAD(HEX(nr2),8,'0'))); 

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