15

One of my QA engineers is supporting an app with a fairly large codebase and a lot of different SharedPreferences files. He came to me the other day asking how to reset the application state between test runs, as if it had been uninstalled-reinstalled.

It doesn't look like that's supported by Espresso (which he is using) nor by the Android test framework natively, so I'm not sure what to tell him. Having a native method to clear all the different SharedPreferences files would be a pretty brittle solution.

How can one reset the application state during instrumentation?

26

Current espresso doesn't provide any mechanism to reset application state. But for each aspect (pref, db, files, permissions) exist a solution.

Initial you must avoid that espresso starts your activity automatically so you have enough time to reset.

@Rule
public ActivityTestRule<Activity> activityTestRule = new ActivityTestRule<>(Activity.class, false, false);

And later start your activity with

activityTestRule.launchActivity(null)

For reseting preferences you can use following snippet (before starting your activity)

File root = InstrumentationRegistry.getTargetContext().getFilesDir().getParentFile();
String[] sharedPreferencesFileNames = new File(root, "shared_prefs").list();
for (String fileName : sharedPreferencesFileNames) {
    InstrumentationRegistry.getTargetContext().getSharedPreferences(fileName.replace(".xml", ""), Context.MODE_PRIVATE).edit().clear().commit();
}

You can reset preferences after starting your activity too. But then the activity may have already read the preferences.

Your application class is only started once and already started before you can reset preferences.

I have started to write an library which should make testing more simple with espresso and uiautomator. This includes tooling for reseting application data. https://github.com/nenick/espresso-macchiato See for example EspAppDataTool with the methods for clearing preferences, databases, cached files and stored files.

  • The project uses a lot of different SharedPreferences files. Like I said, having a native method to clear all the different SharedPreferences files would be a pretty brittle solution. :( – Turnsole Jun 7 '16 at 23:34
  • Its equal if you have one or 9999 tausend SharedPreferences. Typically they are all located in shared_prefs. What else do you expect? As an alternative you can write a script to run each test solely, between each test clear application data with adb and then start the next test. – nenick Jun 8 '16 at 6:42
  • 1
    Oh! I see what you did there. I read it too fast and figured "shared_prefs" was shorthand for your_pref_file_name_here, but this is literally the root folder of the SharedPreferences files. – Turnsole Jun 8 '16 at 20:44
3

Improving on @nenick's solution, encapsulate the state clearing behavior in a custom ActivityTestRule. If you do this, you can allow the test to continue to launch the activity automatically without intervention from you. With a custom ActivityTestRule, the activity is already in the desired state when it launches for the test.

Below is one I implemented to ensure that the app is signed out when the activity launches, per test. Some tests, when they failed, were leaving the app in a signed in state. This would then cause later tests to also fail because the later ones assumed they would need to sign in, but the app would already be signed in.

public class SignedOutActivityTestRule<T extends Activity> extends ActivityTestRule<T> {

    public SignedOutActivityTestRule(Class<T> activityClass) {
        super(activityClass);
    }

    @Override
    protected void beforeActivityLaunched() {
        super.beforeActivityLaunched();
        InstrumentationRegistry.getTargetContext()
                .getSharedPreferences(
                        Authentication.SHARED_PREFERENCES_NAME,
                        Context.MODE_PRIVATE)
                .edit()
                .remove(Authentication.KEY_SECRET)
                .remove(Authentication.KEY_USER_ID)
                .apply();
    }

}

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