1

I have this function below called findNeighboringChains(i, j). You pass in a point (x, y) and it returns all chain objects that exist in the neighboring points (x + 1, y), (x - 1, y), (x, y + 1), and (x, y - 1). If no chain exists at (x, y) then findChainId(x, y) = -1, else it will return an ID >= 0. Only one chain can exist at each (x, y). For more context, this is a function I am using to find adjacent chains to a cell in the game of Go.

I feel like what I have so far is kind of verbose, but I'm not sure how to make it better. It seems like it would be ideal if I could iterate over those points (x + 1, y) ... (x, y - 1) through a loop. Any suggestions?

public ArrayList<Integer> findNeighboringChains(int i, int j) {
    ArrayList<Integer> neighboringChains = new ArrayList<>();

    int tmp = findChainId(i - 1, j);
    if (tmp != -1) {
        neighboringChains.add(tmp);
    }

    tmp = findChainId(i + 1, j);
    if (tmp != -1) {
        neighboringChains.add(tmp);
    }

    tmp = findChainId(i, j - 1);
    if (tmp != -1) {
        neighboringChains.add(tmp);
    }

    tmp = findChainId(i, j + 1);
    if (tmp != -1) {
        neighboringChains.add(tmp);
    }

    return neighboringChains;
}
2

One way would be to utilize the Point object that is built into Java, and iterate over a list of points- each time calling the same piece of code. In my solution/refactoring, I create a new method called "getNeighboringPoints(Point p)", which retrieves the four neighboring points. Then, in your function findNeighboringChains, you can iterate using a for-each loop over that list of points.

There are a lot of variations on this kind of pattern you could do, but you're definitely right to think that it's possible to be less redundant. It's always a good idea to try to follow the DRY principle.

public ArrayList<Integer> findNeighboringChains(int i, int j) {
    ArrayList<Integer> neighboringChains = new ArrayList<>();

    Point p = new Point(i, j);
    List<Point> neighboringPoints = getNeighboringPoints(p);

    for (Point point : neighboringPoints) {
        int tmp = findChainId(point.x, point.y);
        if (tmp != -1) {
            neighboringChains.add(tmp);
        }
    }

    return neighboringChains;
}

/**
 * 
 * @param p
 *            The input point.
 * @return a list of points neighboring point p
 */
private List<Point> getNeighboringPoints(Point p) {
    ArrayList<Point> neighboringPoints = new ArrayList<Point>();
    neighboringPoints.add(new Point(p.x - 1, p.y));
    neighboringPoints.add(new Point(p.x + 1, p.y));
    neighboringPoints.add(new Point(p.x, p.y + 1));
    neighboringPoints.add(new Point(p.x, p.y - 1));
    return neighboringPoints;
}

One of the benefits of the above method, is now you can later on find that you might need to do another operation on all the neighboring points, and you can reuse the method getNeighboringPoints().

Edit:

Another way to reduce redundancy would be to use the extract method technique.

public ArrayList<Integer> findNeighboringChains(int i, int j) {
    ArrayList<Integer> neighboringChains = new ArrayList<>();

    int tmp = findChainId(i - 1, j);
    checkChain(neighboringChains, tmp);

    tmp = findChainId(i + 1, j);
    checkChain(neighboringChains, tmp);

    tmp = findChainId(i, j - 1);
    checkChain(neighboringChains, tmp);

    tmp = findChainId(i, j + 1);
    checkChain(neighboringChains, tmp);

    return neighboringChains;
}

private void checkChain(ArrayList<Integer> neighboringChains, int tmp) {
    if (tmp != -1) {
        neighboringChains.add(tmp);
    }
}

This might be better since it doesn't force usage of the point class on a project which already isn't using points. (It can be annoying when there is one method that uses points where everything else requires the input of two ints).

  • Thanks for the answer. Your solution along with Carl Manaster's comment above helped me a lot – CowZow Jun 2 '16 at 18:08

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