5

Given the following example:

struct tag1 { };
struct tag2 { };

template<typename T>
class Base {
public:
  Base(T /*value*/) { }
  Base(tag1) { }
};

template<>
class Base<void> {
public:
  Base() { }
  Base(tag1) { }
};

template<typename T = void>
class MyClass : public Base<T> {
public:
  using Base<T>::Base;

  MyClass(tag2) : Base<T>(tag1{}) { }
};

int main() {
  {
    MyClass<> defaultConstructible;
    MyClass<> tagConstructible(tag2{});
  }
  {
    MyClass<int> valueConstructible(0);
    MyClass<int> tagConstructible(tag2{});
  }
}

The class MyClass can be parameterized with any types, it shall be default constructible when the type T equals void, otherwise it is constructible from a type T as written in the main function.

I'm using a parameter dependent base class to get this behaviour (through using the constructor of the base class).

Also I need to add constructors to the class hierarchy which accept other parameters, as you see in the example source (tag structs).

Is it possible to do this without declaring all constructors in the same class? Because mixing the superclass constructors with custom ones will yield the following error message:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:30:15: error: no matching function for call to 'MyClass<>::MyClass()'
     MyClass<> defaultConstructible;
               ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:22:18: note: candidate: MyClass<>::MyClass(tag1)
   using Base<T>::Base;
                  ^~~~
main.cpp:22:18: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
main.cpp:25:3: note: candidate: MyClass<T>::MyClass(tag2) [with T = void]
   MyClass(tag2) : Base<T>(tag1{}) { }
   ^~~~~~~
main.cpp:25:3: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
main.cpp:20:7: note: candidate: constexpr MyClass<>::MyClass(const MyClass<>&)
 class MyClass : public Base<T> {
       ^~~~~~~
main.cpp:20:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
main.cpp:20:7: note: candidate: constexpr MyClass<>::MyClass(MyClass<>&&)
main.cpp:20:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided

Demo

  • 1
    As soon you introduce a parameterized constructor for MyClass no default constructor will be generated by the compiler, so what do you actually expect? – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 2 '16 at 17:14
  • Good point, I expect the class MyClass to be default constructible when the parameter T is void because I'm using it from the base class (which is explicitly declared there). – Denis Blank Jun 2 '16 at 17:16
  • "I expect the class MyClass to be default constructible when the parameter T is void because I'm using it from the base class" That behavior of deduction isn't "inherited". – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 2 '16 at 17:17
  • Check out [class.inhctor]/3 (in N4527 in case it changed; C++17 does have a change surrounding inheriting constructors). – chris Jun 2 '16 at 17:18
  • @DenisBlank like here ? – Piotr Skotnicki Jun 2 '16 at 17:19
2

Once you introduce your own constructor, the default constructor will not get implicitly defined - it doesn't matter that you're trying to inherit it.

You can simply explicitly define the default constructor as defaulted:

template<typename T = void>
class MyClass : public Base<T> {
public:
  using Base<T>::Base;

  MyClass() = default;
  MyClass(tag2) : Base<T>(tag1{}) { }
};

Here, MyClass<> becomes default constructible, but MyClass<int> still isn't because Base<int> isn't.

0

To restate from my 1st comment:

As soon you introduce a parameterized constructor for MyClass no default constructor will be generated by the compiler

You can easily fix this providing the default constructor of MyClass explicitely:

template<typename T = void>
class MyClass : public Base<T> {
public:
  using Base<T>::Base;

  MyClass() = default; // <<<<<<<<<<<
  MyClass(tag2) : Base<T>(tag1{}) { }
};

Demo

The default behavior of Base<T> isn't inherited, it's default constructor is called with the = default; implementation though.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.