53

I'm in the process of converting a map from using mapbox.js to mapbox-gl.js, and am having trouble drawing a circle that uses miles or meters for its radius instead of pixels. This particular circle is used to show the area for distance in any direction from a central point.

Previously I was able to use the following, which was then added to a layer group:

// 500 miles = 804672 meters
L.circle(L.latLng(41.0804, -85.1392), 804672, {
    stroke: false,
    fill: true,
    fillOpacity: 0.6,
    fillColor: "#5b94c6",
    className: "circle_500"
});

The only documentation I've found to do this in Mapbox GL is the following:

map.addSource("source_circle_500", {
    "type": "geojson",
    "data": {
        "type": "FeatureCollection",
        "features": [{
            "type": "Feature",
            "geometry": {
                "type": "Point",
                "coordinates": [-85.1392, 41.0804]
            }
        }]
    }
});

map.addLayer({
    "id": "circle500",
    "type": "circle",
    "source": "source_circle_500",
    "layout": {
        "visibility": "none"
    },
    "paint": {
        "circle-radius": 804672,
        "circle-color": "#5b94c6",
        "circle-opacity": 0.6
    }
});

But this renders the circle in pixels, which does not scale with zoom. Is there currently a way with Mapbox GL to render a layer with a circle (or multiple) that's based on distance and scales with zoom?

I am currently using v0.19.0 of Mapbox GL.

81

I've solved this problem for my use cases by using a GeoJSON polygon. It's not strictly a circle but by increasing the number of sides on the polygon you can get pretty close.

The added benefit to this method is that it will correctly change its pitch, size, bearing, etc with the map automatically.

Here is the function to generate the GeoJSON Polygon

var createGeoJSONCircle = function(center, radiusInKm, points) {
    if(!points) points = 64;

    var coords = {
        latitude: center[1],
        longitude: center[0]
    };

    var km = radiusInKm;

    var ret = [];
    var distanceX = km/(111.320*Math.cos(coords.latitude*Math.PI/180));
    var distanceY = km/110.574;

    var theta, x, y;
    for(var i=0; i<points; i++) {
        theta = (i/points)*(2*Math.PI);
        x = distanceX*Math.cos(theta);
        y = distanceY*Math.sin(theta);

        ret.push([coords.longitude+x, coords.latitude+y]);
    }
    ret.push(ret[0]);

    return {
        "type": "geojson",
        "data": {
            "type": "FeatureCollection",
            "features": [{
                "type": "Feature",
                "geometry": {
                    "type": "Polygon",
                    "coordinates": [ret]
                }
            }]
        }
    };
};

You can use it like this:

map.addSource("polygon", createGeoJSONCircle([-93.6248586, 41.58527859], 0.5));

map.addLayer({
    "id": "polygon",
    "type": "fill",
    "source": "polygon",
    "layout": {},
    "paint": {
        "fill-color": "blue",
        "fill-opacity": 0.6
    }
});

If you need to update the circle you created later you can do it like this (note the need to grab the data property to pass to setData):

map.getSource('polygon').setData(createGeoJSONCircle([-93.6248586, 41.58527859], 1).data);

And the output looks like this:

Example Image

6
  • Is there a way to not fill, but just show a stroke. Representing a radius ring?
    – KeyOfJ
    May 15 '17 at 20:28
  • Yeah just play around with the styling to get what you want: mapbox.com/mapbox-gl-js/style-spec/#layers-fill
    – Brad Dwyer
    May 16 '17 at 20:58
  • 3
    @BradDwyer the current style does not allow the setting of the stroke width. It defaults to 1. You can only set the stroke color. I set the fill color for the polygon to transparent which seems to work. Need to test across browsers.
    – KeyOfJ
    May 18 '17 at 19:31
  • 8
    A cleaner solution would be to use turf-circle: github.com/Turfjs/turf/tree/master/packages/turf-circle Dec 6 '17 at 0:48
  • How did you animate the map to turn like this?
    – Drazen
    Aug 17 '18 at 16:03
46

Elaborating on Lucas' answer, I've come up with a way of estimating the parameters in order to draw a circle based on a certain metric size.

The map supports zoom levels between 0 and 20. Let's say we define the radius as follows:

"circle-radius": {
  stops: [
    [0, 0],
    [20, RADIUS]
  ],
  base: 2
}

The map is going to render the circle at all zoom levels since we defined a value for the smallest zoom level (0) and the largest (20). For all zoom levels in between it results in a radius of (approximately) RADIUS/2^(20-zoom). Thus, if we set RADIUS to the correct pixel size that matches our metric value, we get the correct radius for all zoom levels.

So we're basically after a conversion factor that transforms meters to a pixel size at zoom level 20. Of course this factor depends on the latitude. If we measure the length of a horizontal line at the equator at the max zoom level 20 and divide by the number of pixels that this line spans, we get a factor ~0.075m/px (meters per pixel). Applying the mercator latitude scaling factor of 1 / cos(phi), we obtain the correct meter to pixel ratio for any latitude:

const metersToPixelsAtMaxZoom = (meters, latitude) =>
  meters / 0.075 / Math.cos(latitude * Math.PI / 180)

Thus, setting RADIUS to metersToPixelsAtMaxZoom(radiusInMeters, latitude) gets us a circle with the correct size:

"circle-radius": {
  stops: [
    [0, 0],
    [20, metersToPixelsAtMaxZoom(radiusInMeters, latitude)]
  ],
  base: 2
}
9
  • 1
    @jrrdnx This is due to how the interpolation is done. The culprit are the - 1 in this line of mapbox-gl-function. I tested with your example and getting rid of that -1 fixes it. I don't see any reason for that - 1 and I tracked down where it was introduced and added a comment on that commit.
    – fphilipe
    Jun 27 '16 at 15:58
  • 1
    @jrrdnx Opened a PR fixing this.
    – fphilipe
    Jun 28 '16 at 8:14
  • 1
    At zoom 13-14, the circle disappears, any ideas?
    – ericjam
    Mar 30 '18 at 19:29
  • 3
    FYI you can replace the 0.075 value in the formula with 78271.484 / 2 ** zoom. For example: 78271.484 / 2 ** 20 = 0.07464550399780273. The value is from: docs.mapbox.com/help/glossary/zoom-level
    – Mike Horn
    Nov 13 '19 at 18:38
  • 2
    @Jan it's the exponentiation operator: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – Mike Horn
    Mar 24 '20 at 23:03
9

Although all answers are complicated, here is the simplest answer

docs

var center = [84.82512804700335, 26.241818082937552];
var radius = 5;
var options = {steps: 50, units: 'kilometers', properties: {foo: 'bar'}};
var circle = turf.circle(center, radius, options);

DEMO LINK

result

enter image description here

3
  • It'll scale as well, cheers
    – Rahul
    Jan 13 at 13:32
  • this should be the top answer, thanks!
    – tonnoz
    Feb 21 at 10:51
  • @tonnoz glad to hear that this works for you!
    – Rahul
    Feb 21 at 12:13
5

The simple way using @turf/turf

import * as turf from "@turf/turf";
import mapboxgl from "mapbox-gl";

map.on('load', function(){
let _center = turf.point([longitude, latitude]);
let _radius = 25;
let _options = {
  steps: 80,
  units: 'kilometers' // or "mile"
};

let _circle = turf.circle(_center, _radius, _options);

map.addSource("circleData", {
      type: "geojson",
      data: _circle,
    });

map.addLayer({
      id: "circle-fill",
      type: "fill",
      source: "circleData",
      paint: {
        "fill-color": "yellow",
        "fill-opacity": 0.2,
      },
    });


});

Important note

In this case used mapboxgl v1 If you using mapboxgl v2 You get an error

**Uncaught ReferenceError: _createClass is not defined**

To solve this error, you must use the following method https://github.com/mapbox/mapbox-gl-js-docs/blob/6d91ce00e7e1b2495872dac969e497366befb7d7/docs/pages/api/index.md#transpiling-v2

4

This functionality is not built into GL JS but you can emulate it using functions.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<head>
  <meta charset='utf-8' />
  <title></title>
  <meta name='viewport' content='initial-scale=1,maximum-scale=1,user-scalable=no' />
  <script src='https://api.tiles.mapbox.com/mapbox-gl-js/v0.19.0/mapbox-gl.js'></script>
  <link href='https://api.tiles.mapbox.com/mapbox-gl-js/v0.19.0/mapbox-gl.css' rel='stylesheet' />
  <style>
    body {
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
    }
    #map {
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
      bottom: 0;
      width: 100%;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>

  <div id='map'></div>
  <script>
    mapboxgl.accessToken = 'pk.eyJ1IjoibHVjYXN3b2oiLCJhIjoiNWtUX3JhdyJ9.WtCTtw6n20XV2DwwJHkGqQ';
    var map = new mapboxgl.Map({
      container: 'map',
      style: 'mapbox://styles/mapbox/streets-v8',
      center: [-74.50, 40],
      zoom: 9,
      minZoom: 5,
      maxZoom: 15
    });

    map.on('load', function() {
      map.addSource("source_circle_500", {
        "type": "geojson",
        "data": {
          "type": "FeatureCollection",
          "features": [{
            "type": "Feature",
            "geometry": {
              "type": "Point",
              "coordinates": [-74.50, 40]
            }
          }]
        }
      });

      map.addLayer({
        "id": "circle500",
        "type": "circle",
        "source": "source_circle_500",
        "paint": {
          "circle-radius": {
            stops: [
              [5, 1],
              [15, 1024]
            ],
            base: 2
          },
          "circle-color": "red",
          "circle-opacity": 0.6
        }
      });
    });
  </script>

</body>

</html>

Important Caveats:

  • Determining the function parameters for a particular real-world measurement isn't straightforward. They change with the longitude / latitude of the feature.
  • Circles larger than 1024px aren't going to render properly due to the nature of tiled data and the way we pack data for WebGL
3
  • Can you please elaborate on this statement: "Determining the function parameters for a particular real-world measurement isn't straightforward. They change with the longitude / latitude of the feature."? All of my circles are based on the exact same center, so the latitude/longitude is known and will never change.
    – jrrdnx
    Jun 6 '16 at 12:34
  • Using this method you're basically calculating the number of pixels which corresponds to the physical measurement you want. But that calculation depends on latitude, due to the projection being used. (Also, did you really downvote Lucas' answer??) Jun 10 '16 at 0:44
  • 1
    @SteveBennett I understood what it was supposed to be doing, but his answer stopped short of actually providing the functionality that I was looking for (hard stops at 2 hard-coded zoom levels does not equate to a function, imo). Perhaps asking him to elaborate was the wrong question, instead of asking for the actual function. Assuming it's an actual function (like in fphillipe's answer), it would be able to take the latitude as an argument. But no, I did not downvote.
    – jrrdnx
    Jun 22 '16 at 13:58
2

I found this MapboxCircle module

You only need to import the script

<script src='https://npmcdn.com/mapbox-gl-circle/dist/mapbox-gl-circle.min.js'></script>

And print your circle

var myCircle = new MapboxCircle({lat: 39.984, lng: -75.343}, 25000, {
    editable: true,
    minRadius: 1500,
    fillColor: '#29AB87'
}).addTo(myMapboxGlMap);
2
  • Simplest solution here - thanks!
    – Perelan
    May 22 at 8:25
  • how to add mousemove event listener to above lib, right now it does not have that Jun 3 at 5:44
0

Lucas and fphilipe answers works perfectly ! For those working with react-native-mapbox and drawing over the map you must take into account the pixel density of the screen as follow :

  pixelValue(latitude: number, meters: number, zoomLevel: number) {
    const mapPixels = meters / (78271.484 / 2 ** zoomLevel) / Math.cos((latitude * Math.PI) / 180);
    const screenPixel = mapPixels * Math.floor(PixelRatio.get());
    return screenPixel;
  }
2
0

Credits belongs to @Brad Dwyer, this is the Ruby version of his solution:

def createGeoJSONCircle(coordinates, radius = 2, points = 64)
  coordinate = {
    longitude: coordinates.first[0].to_f,
    latitude: coordinates.first[1].to_f,
  }

  ret = []
  # radius is set in kilometers
  distanceX = radius / (111.320 * Math.cos(coordinate[:latitude] * Math::PI / 180))
  distanceY = radius / 110.574

  for i in 0..points
    theta = (i.to_f / points.to_f) * (2 * Math::PI)
    x = distanceX * Math.cos(theta)
    y = distanceY * Math.sin(theta)

    ret << [(coordinate[:longitude] + x).to_s, (coordinate[:latitude] + y).to_s]
  end
  ret << ret.first
  ret
end

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