3

Tried to retrieve some bits of a number, e.g. the marked bits 00001011 of the byte 11 below,

(byte) 11 >> 1 << 6 >> 5

but why is the result 10 instead of 2 ?

@EDIT

To make a method below, the solution from @Yassin Hajaj seems more feasible.

public byte getBits(byte b, int from, int to) { // from & to inclusive

  return (byte) (b >> from << (8 - (to - from + 1))) >> (8 - to - 1);
}

getBits((byte) 11, 1, 2); // => 2

Or more universal with the hints from @Andreas,

public <T extends Number> long getBits(T n, int from, int to) {

  return n.longValue() >>> from << (64 - (to - from + 1)) >>> (64 - to - 1);
}

getBits((byte) 11, 1, 2); // => 2
3
  • Why do you think it should be 2 ? – Yassin Hajaj Jun 2 '16 at 20:44
  • Don't they have bitwise AND in Java? 0b11 & 0x06 – infixed Jun 2 '16 at 20:50
  • @infixed Yes! – Michael Jun 2 '16 at 20:51
2

TL;DR Use b & 6, e.g. (byte)(11 & 6). See working getBits() implementation(s) at the end.


First of all, casting 11 to a byte is rather meaningless, because the >> operator will coerce it right back to an int value.

To show you why your code doesn't work, here is a program that displays all the intermediate steps:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (byte i = 0; i <= 16; i++) {
        int i1 = i >> 1;
        int i2 = i1 << 6;
        int i3 = i2 >> 5;
        System.out.printf("%3d %s -> %3d %s -> %3d %10s -> %3d %s%n", i, bin(i), i1, bin(i1), i2, bin(i2), i3, bin(i3));
    }
}
private static String bin(int value) {
    String s = Integer.toBinaryString(value);
    return "0000000".substring(Math.min(7, s.length() - 1)) + s;
}

Output:

  0 00000000 ->   0 00000000 ->   0   00000000 ->   0 00000000
  1 00000001 ->   0 00000000 ->   0   00000000 ->   0 00000000
  2 00000010 ->   1 00000001 ->  64   01000000 ->   2 00000010
  3 00000011 ->   1 00000001 ->  64   01000000 ->   2 00000010
  4 00000100 ->   2 00000010 -> 128   10000000 ->   4 00000100
  5 00000101 ->   2 00000010 -> 128   10000000 ->   4 00000100
  6 00000110 ->   3 00000011 -> 192   11000000 ->   6 00000110
  7 00000111 ->   3 00000011 -> 192   11000000 ->   6 00000110
  8 00001000 ->   4 00000100 -> 256  100000000 ->   8 00001000
  9 00001001 ->   4 00000100 -> 256  100000000 ->   8 00001000
 10 00001010 ->   5 00000101 -> 320  101000000 ->  10 00001010
 11 00001011 ->   5 00000101 -> 320  101000000 ->  10 00001010
 12 00001100 ->   6 00000110 -> 384  110000000 ->  12 00001100
 13 00001101 ->   6 00000110 -> 384  110000000 ->  12 00001100
 14 00001110 ->   7 00000111 -> 448  111000000 ->  14 00001110
 15 00001111 ->   7 00000111 -> 448  111000000 ->  14 00001110
 16 00010000 ->   8 00001000 -> 512 1000000000 ->  16 00010000

Your upper bits are not getting cleared, because it's operating on int values. If you change everything to byte, you get:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (byte i = 0; i <= 16; i++) {
        byte i1 = (byte)(i >> 1);
        byte i2 = (byte)(i1 << 6);
        byte i3 = (byte)(i2 >> 5);
        System.out.printf("%3d %s -> %3d %s -> %4d %s -> %3d %s%n", i, bin(i), i1, bin(i1), i2, bin(i2), i3, bin(i3));
    }
}
private static String bin(byte value) {
    String s = Integer.toBinaryString(value & 0xFF);
    return "0000000".substring(s.length() - 1) + s;
}
  0 00000000 ->   0 00000000 ->    0 00000000 ->   0 00000000
  1 00000001 ->   0 00000000 ->    0 00000000 ->   0 00000000
  2 00000010 ->   1 00000001 ->   64 01000000 ->   2 00000010
  3 00000011 ->   1 00000001 ->   64 01000000 ->   2 00000010
  4 00000100 ->   2 00000010 -> -128 10000000 ->  -4 11111100
  5 00000101 ->   2 00000010 -> -128 10000000 ->  -4 11111100
  6 00000110 ->   3 00000011 ->  -64 11000000 ->  -2 11111110
  7 00000111 ->   3 00000011 ->  -64 11000000 ->  -2 11111110
  8 00001000 ->   4 00000100 ->    0 00000000 ->   0 00000000
  9 00001001 ->   4 00000100 ->    0 00000000 ->   0 00000000
 10 00001010 ->   5 00000101 ->   64 01000000 ->   2 00000010
 11 00001011 ->   5 00000101 ->   64 01000000 ->   2 00000010
 12 00001100 ->   6 00000110 -> -128 10000000 ->  -4 11111100
 13 00001101 ->   6 00000110 -> -128 10000000 ->  -4 11111100
 14 00001110 ->   7 00000111 ->  -64 11000000 ->  -2 11111110
 15 00001111 ->   7 00000111 ->  -64 11000000 ->  -2 11111110
 16 00010000 ->   8 00001000 ->    0 00000000 ->   0 00000000

Here, the problem is the sign-extension you get from >>. Even switching to >>> won't work, because the >>> still coerces to int with sign-extension before the shift happens.

To get rid of sign-extension, you have to convert byte to int using b & 0xFF, because the & will coerce b to an int with sign-extension, then the bitwise AND operator will remove all those bits.

Of course, if you're going to use bitwise AND anyway, just use it to get the desired result, i.e. b & 0b00000110 (or b & 6).


For the same reason as described above, the getBits() method doesn't work.

Solution is to still use a bitwise AND operator, but construct the bit-mask from the supplied from and to values.

The trick here is the use (1 << x) - 1 to create a mask of x bits, e.g. 5 -> 0b00011111. So if you want from 2 to 4 inclusive, build 0x00011111 (5! bits) and 0x00000011 (2 bits), then XOR them to get 0x00011100.

public static byte getBits(byte b, int from, int to) {
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to > 7)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int mask = ((1 << (to + 1)) - 1) ^ ((1 << from) - 1);
    return (byte)(b & mask);
}
  0 00000000 ->   0 00000000
  1 00000001 ->   0 00000000
  2 00000010 ->   2 00000010
  3 00000011 ->   2 00000010
  4 00000100 ->   4 00000100
  5 00000101 ->   4 00000100
  6 00000110 ->   6 00000110
  7 00000111 ->   6 00000110
  8 00001000 ->   0 00000000
  9 00001001 ->   0 00000000
 10 00001010 ->   2 00000010
 11 00001011 ->   2 00000010
 12 00001100 ->   4 00000100
 13 00001101 ->   4 00000100
 14 00001110 ->   6 00000110
 15 00001111 ->   6 00000110
 16 00010000 ->   0 00000000

For other primitive types, overload the method:

public static byte getBits(byte value, int from, int to) {
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to > 7)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int mask = ((1 << (to + 1)) - 1) ^ ((1 << from) - 1);
    return (byte)(value & mask);
}
public static short getBits(short value, int from, int to) {
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to > 15)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int mask = ((1 << (to + 1)) - 1) ^ ((1 << from) - 1);
    return (short)(value & mask);
}
public static int getBits(int value, int from, int to) {
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to > 31)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int mask = ((1 << (to + 1)) - 1) ^ ((1 << from) - 1);
    return value & mask;
}
public static long getBits(long value, int from, int to) {
    if (from < 0 || from > to || to > 63)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    long mask = ((1L << (to + 1)) - 1) ^ ((1L << from) - 1); // <-- notice the change to long and 1L
    return value & mask;
}
1
  • Great write-up, an obvious accepted answer although more time in need to digest. Thanks tons! – sof Jun 2 '16 at 22:30
6

You did not specify your initial number to be of the binary system. Taking advantage of binary literals, you could fix this by prefixing the number with 0b. The code then outputs the desired 2

byte b = (byte) 0b11 >> 1 << 6 >> 5;
System.out.println(b); // 2
3
  • Which is more efficient performance-wise, your solution or the one below from @Yassin Hajaj ? – sof Jun 2 '16 at 21:10
  • That won't work. The purpose of << 6 is to remove the upper 5 bits from the byte, by making them roll off the left end of a byte. However, << coerced everything to int, so the upper 5 bits are not being cleared. --- Also, question wanted the decimal 11, not the binary 0b11, as the starting value, hence the shown initial value of 00001011. --- Intent was xxxxxYZx >> 1 is 0xxxxxYZ, << 6 is YZ000000, and >> 5 is 00000YZ0. – Andreas Jun 2 '16 at 21:29
  • 2
    @sof the other answer does a completely different thing that happens to come out with the same answer. In any event, all of these solutions take zero time, because they're compiled down to constants. You need to figure out what the right math is. – Louis Wasserman Jun 2 '16 at 22:13
3

Another way of getting 2 is to force the cast to byte after having reached << 6 to keep only the last eight bits of the number.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    byte b;
    b = (byte) (11 >> 1 << 6) >> 5;
    System.out.println(b); // 2
}
3
  • 2
    Beware sign-extension. You want to use >>>. Also, casting 11 to byte is meaningless, since >> will immediately coerce it back to int. – Andreas Jun 2 '16 at 21:42
  • Actually >>> won't work either, because of coersion to int. – Andreas Jun 2 '16 at 22:26
  • ANDing with 0xFF ( & 0xff ) may be better than casting to byte for isolating 8 bits – infixed Jun 3 '16 at 12:42
2

So you have 11 base 10 ( 0b1011 aka 0x0B ) and you want the 2's bit and the 4's bit?

Just do a bitwise AND with those two bits ( 0x04 + 0x02 = 0x06 )

x = 11 & 0x06;

Shifting not required

2
  • Afraid to still need shift in case of making a method like getBits(number, fromMth, toNth), otherwise you're right. – sof Jun 2 '16 at 21:15
  • Once upon a time, when ALUs were wimpy and instruction sets sparse, a bunch of shifts would have been considered more expensive than a simple AND. Even if one were making a general function, precalculating the masks would speed up things. Especially if the result bits are to be left in their original positions. A table of 8 different masks. Take mask for M XOR with mask for N, then AND that with your input – infixed Jun 2 '16 at 21:30

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