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I was programming in my Xcode project and suddenly I got a warning that this:

 for var i:CGFloat = 0; i<3; i++ 

"will be removed in Swift 3." It gave me an option to "fix" the code to Swift 3 syntax and switched it to this:

for i:CGFloat in 0 ..< 3 {

Now my code will not run and the error it gets "Binary operator '.<' cannot be applied to two 'Int' operands.

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6
for i in 0..<3 {
    let someFloat = CGFloat(i) // if you need a CGFloat
}

Check your spacing, remove the CGFloat type from the loop declaration.

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As @JAL stated, I don't think you can run a for loop with a CGFloat, but you also have a couple of options here.

You could use a range operator like so:

// i is used an int
for i in 0..<3 {
    let convertedI = CGFloat(i) // This converts i to a new value as a CGFloat 
}

You could also use stride in Swift 2 and cast as a CGFloat:

// i is now a CGFloat 
for i in (0 as CGFloat).stride(to: 3, by: 1) {
    // No need to convert because i is now a CGFloat 
}

And finally, stride in Swift 3:

// i is an int in this scenario
for i in stride(from: 0, to: 3, by: 1) {
    let convertedI = CGFloat(i) // This converts i to a new value as a CGFloat 
}

Update:

Changed my Swift 2 stride to cast i as a CGFloat, thanks to @Hamish.

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  • 2
    You can use actually stride directly with a CGFloat if you want
    – Hamish
    Jun 2 '16 at 21:39
  • You're absolutely right! I'll update my answer accordingly.
    – ZGski
    Jun 2 '16 at 21:44

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