29

Is there a way in JavaScript to send an HTTP request to an HTTP server and wait until the server responds with a reply? I want my program to wait until the server replies and not to execute any other command that is after this request. If the HTTP server is down I want the HTTP request to be repeated after a timeout until the server replies, and then the execution of the program can continue normally.

Any ideas?

Thank you in advance, Thanasis

1
  • Just a side note, in jQuery you're looking for ajaxStop. Aug 6, 2021 at 17:02

8 Answers 8

46

There is a 3rd parameter to XmlHttpRequest's open(), which aims to indicate that you want the request to by asynchronous (and so handle the response through an onreadystatechange handler).

So if you want it to be synchronous (i.e. wait for the answer), just specify false for this 3rd argument. You may also want to set a limited timeout property for your request in this case, as it would block the page until reception.

Here is an all-in-one sample function for both sync and async:

function httpRequest(address, reqType, asyncProc) {
  var req = window.XMLHttpRequest ? new XMLHttpRequest() : new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
  if (asyncProc) { 
    req.onreadystatechange = function() { 
      if (this.readyState == 4) {
        asyncProc(this);
      } 
    };
  } else { 
    req.timeout = 4000;  // Reduce default 2mn-like timeout to 4 s if synchronous
  }
  req.open(reqType, address, !(!asyncProc));
  req.send();
  return req;
}

which you could call this way:

var req = httpRequest("http://example.com/aPageToTestForExistence.html", "HEAD");  // In this example you don't want to GET the full page contents
alert(req.status == 200 ? "found!" : "failed");  // We didn't provided an async proc so this will be executed after request completion only
2
  • 1
    This lead me to the async library, which makes this extraordinarily simple. github.com/caolan/async Don't be fooled by the packaging cruft. You just include one little javascript file - async.js! Feb 12, 2015 at 3:37
  • 3
    First time I tried a synchronous request today, as I had a similar need as the OP. Was surprised to get a complaint (on Chrome) saying: "InvalidAccessError: Failed to execute 'open' on 'XMLHttpRequest': Synchronous requests must not set a timeout.". Considering the nature on a synchronous request, such a restriction seems crazy, but that was the result. Weird!
    – Randy
    May 29, 2019 at 20:17
8

You can perform a synchronous request. jQuery example:

$(function() {
    $.ajax({
       async: false,
       // other parameters
    });
});

You should take a look at jQuery's AJAX API. I highly recommend using a framework like jQuery for this stuff. Manually doing cross-browser ajax is a real pain!

4
  • this is the best way! However, many people think that JS Frameworks are evil and tend to code everything themselves.
    – Alex
    Sep 21, 2010 at 12:44
  • I have tried to do it with multiple ways using XmlHttpRequest for example, but I haven't find a way so as to stop the execution until I get a respond.. Sep 21, 2010 at 12:45
  • 6
    Alex, that's me! I'm one of them! ;) Sep 21, 2010 at 12:45
  • If you don't need a JS framework, just use a normal XmlHttpRequest callback with async.waterfall() from async.js github.com/caolan/async Feb 12, 2015 at 3:38
8

You can use XMLHttpRequest object to send your request. Once request is sent, you can check readyState property to identify current state. readyState will have following different states.

  • Uninitialized - Has not started loading yet
  • Loading - Is loading
  • Interactive - Has loaded enough and the user can interact with it
  • Complete - Fully loaded

for example:

xmlhttp.open("GET","somepage.xml",true);
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = checkData;
xmlhttp.send(null);

function checkData()
{
    alert(xmlhttp.readyState);
}

hope this will help

4
  • 2
    I want the execution of the program to be serial and I don't want to use callbacks. I want if possible to stop the execution of the program at "xmlhttp.send(null);" call and then to continue after the request has finished. Sep 21, 2010 at 13:00
  • You can play with readyState property. May be you can put it in while loop and so that it will not go to next line until execution is finished. Also if you can predict execution time, you may use setTimeOut() function. more on this function you can read here. w3schools.com/jsref/met_win_settimeout.asp Sep 22, 2010 at 5:13
  • this works for me, thx. Here are the possible ready states: 0:UNSENT, 1:OPENED,2:HEADERS_RECEIVED,3:LOADING,4:DONE
    – chris
    Mar 14, 2018 at 8:25
  • This seems to be better than waiting or blocking until execution Jul 5, 2018 at 11:39
1

For the modern browser, I will use the fetch instead of XMLHttpRequest.

async function job() {
  const response = await fetch("https://api.ipify.org?format=json", {}) // type: Promise<Response>
  if (!response.ok) {
    throw Error(response.statusText)
  }
  return response.text()
}


async function onCommit() {
  const result = await job()
  // The following will run after the `job` is finished.
  console.log(result)
}

an examples

<button onclick="onCommit()">Commit</button>
<script>
  function onCommit() {
    new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      resolve(job1())
    }).then(job1Result => {
      return job2(job1Result)
    }).then(job2Result => {
      return job3(job2Result)
    }).catch(err => { // If job1, job2, job3, any of them throw the error, then will catch it.
      alert(err)
    })
  }

  async function testFunc(url, options) {
    // options: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/WindowOrWorkerGlobalScope/fetch
    const response = await fetch(url, options) // type: Promise<Response>
    if (!response.ok) {
      const errMsg = await response.text()
      throw Error(`${response.statusText} (${response.status}) | ${errMsg} `)
    }
    return response
  }

  async function job1() {
    console.log("job1")
    const response =  await testFunc("https://api.ipify.org?format=json", {})
    return await response.json()
  }

  async function job2(job1Data) {
    console.log("job2")
    console.log(job1Data)
    const textHeaders = new Headers()
    textHeaders.append('Content-Type', 'text/plain; charset-utf-8')
    const options = {"headers": textHeaders}
    const response = await testFunc("https://api.ipify.org/?format=text", options)
    // throw Error(`test error`) // You can cancel the comment to trigger the error.
    return await response.text()
  }

  function job3(job2Data) {
    console.log("job3")
    console.log(job2Data)
  }
</script>

0

For this you can start loader in javascript as soon as page starts loading and then you can close it when request finishes or your dom is ready. What i am trying to say, as page load starts, start a loader . Then page can do multiple synchronous request using ajax , until and unless you didn't get response, do not close close loader. After receiving the desired in response in final call, you can close the loader.

3
  • 1
    you are off... he is asking about stalling multiple requests.
    – Alex
    Sep 21, 2010 at 12:46
  • @Thanasis Petsas : Please check the edited post. Hope this can help you.
    – Nik
    Sep 21, 2010 at 13:19
  • Can you post a simple example please? Sep 21, 2010 at 14:45
0

I have a similar situation in an game built with Three.js and Google Closure. I have to load 2 resources, Three and Closure do not allow me to make these synchronous.

Initially I naively wrote the following:

main() {

  ...
  var loaded=0;
  ...

  // Load Three geometry
  var loader = new THREE.JSONLoader();
  loader.load("x/data.three.json", function(geometry) {
    ...
    loaded++;
    });

   // Load my engine data
  goog.net.XhrIo.send("x/data.engine.json", function(e) {
    var obj = e.target.getResponseJson();
    ...
    loaded++;
    });

  // Wait for callbacks to complete
  while(loaded<2) {}

  // Initiate an animation loop
  ...
};

The loop that waits for the callbacks to complete never ends, from the point of view of the loop loaded never get incremented. The problem is that the callbacks are not fired until main returns (at least on Chrome anyway).

One solution might be to have both callbacks check to see if it's the last to complete, and them go on to initiate the animation loop.

Another solution - perhaps a more direct answer to what you are asking (how to wait for each load before initiating another) - would be to nest the callbacks as follows:

// Load Three geometry
var loader = new THREE.JSONLoader();
loader.load("x/data.three.json", function(geometry) {
  ...

   // Load my engine data
   goog.net.XhrIo.send("x/data.engine.json", function(e) {
     var obj = e.target.getResponseJson();
     ...

     // Initiate an animation loop
     ...

    });
  });
};
2
  • 1
    Hi Argenti, welcome to stackoverflow! Please make your answers as clear as possible. Use the curly braces or wrap your code using the ` character. If possible, try and see if you can get something to run before posting. These questions may also be referred to in the future, so please try and make the effort! Dec 30, 2011 at 15:09
  • I found this: Note: Starting with Gecko 30.0 (Firefox 30.0 / Thunderbird 30.0 / SeaMonkey 2.27), synchronous requests on the main thread have been deprecated due to the negative effects to the user experience. Mozilla Dev.Network
    – B.F.
    Dec 23, 2014 at 19:41
0

This is an old question but wanted to provide a different take.

This is an async function that creates a promise that resolves with the Http object when the request is complete. This allow you to use more modern async/await syntax when working with XMLHttpRequest.

async sendRequest() {
    const Http = new XMLHttpRequest();
    const url='http://localhost:8000/';
    Http.open("GET", url);
    Http.send();

    if (Http.readyState === XMLHttpRequest.DONE) {
        return Http;
    }

    let res;
    const p = new Promise((r) => res = r);
    Http.onreadystatechange = () => {
        if (Http.readyState === XMLHttpRequest.DONE) {
            res(Http);
        }
    }
    return p;
}

Usage

const response = await sendRequest();
const status = response.status;
if (status === 0 || (status >= 200 && status < 400)) {
    // The request has been completed successfully
    console.log(response.responseText);
} else {
    // Oh no! There has been an error with the request!
    console.log(`Server Error: ${response.status}`)
}
-1

For those using axios, you can wrap it in an async iife and then await it:

(async () => {
  let res = await axios.get('https://example.com');

  // do stuff with the response
})();

Note, I haven't done any error checking here.

1
  • I know this question was posted a long time ago, but I thought I'd point this out because I found it quite useful. Sep 20, 2020 at 15:57

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