1

Consider the following code:

template<int... V>
static constexpr int f(int v) {
    int a[] = { (v ^= V, 0)... };       // Line 3
    return v;
}

static constexpr int i = f<0x00>(0x11); // Line 7

int main() { }

It compiles with GCC and fails to compile with clang with the following error:

main.cpp:7:22: error: constexpr variable 'i' must be initialized by a constant expression

[...]

main.cpp:3:23: note: subexpression not valid in a constant expression

Note that it doesn't depend on the fact that I'm using a template function.
In other terms, neither the code above nor the one below compile with clang:

static constexpr int mix(int v, int u) {
    int a[] = { (v ^= u, 0) };
    return v;
}

static constexpr int mf = mix(0x11, 0x00);

int main() { }

Which compiler is right?

  • 1
    Version? Flags? – Columbo Jun 3 '16 at 9:35
  • C++17 says: return (v ^ ... ^ V); :-) – Kerrek SB Jun 3 '16 at 9:44
  • I'd think this might be because ^= assigns a value to v. But then again, this could be resolved at compile time. – Klemens Morgenstern Jun 3 '16 at 9:50
  • 1
    @KlemensMorgenstern: Assignment is definitely allowed in constexpr functions (since C++14). This really should work. – Kerrek SB Jun 3 '16 at 10:08
  • 1
    Weird.. this compiles again int a[] = { (+(v ^= V), 0)... }; seems like if it's doing an lvalue to rvalue conversion after the assignment, then it works. – Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 3 '16 at 18:21
1

As mentioned here, it is a bug of clang:

the bug is something odd about the left-hand side of a comma operator

Confirmed and fixed.

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