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I am trying to implement a rather simple averaging during transformation of an image. I already successfully implemented the transformation, but now I have to process this resulting image by summing up all pixels of all 5x5 pixels rectangles. My Idea was to increment a counter for each such 5x5 block whenever a pixel in this block is set. However, these block-counters are by far not incremented often enough. So for debugging I checked how often any pixel of such a block is hit at all:

    int x = (blockIdx.x*blockDim.x) + threadIdx.x;
    int y = (blockIdx.y*blockDim.y) + threadIdx.y;

    if((x<5)&&(y<5)) 
{
    resultArray [0]++; 
}

The kernel is called like this:

dim3 threadsPerBlock(8, 8); 
dim3 grid(targetAreaRect_px._uiWidth / threadsPerBlock.x, targetAreaRect_px._uiHeight / threadsPerBlock.y);
CudaTransformAndAverageImage << < grid, threadsPerBlock >> > (pcPreRasteredImage_dyn, resultArray ); 

I would expect resultArray [0] to contain 25 after kernel execution, but it only contains 1. Is this due to some optimization by the CUDA compiler?

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  • The kernel is called like this: dim3 threadsPerBlock(8, 8); dim3 grid(targetAreaRect_px._uiWidth / threadsPerBlock.x, targetAreaRect_px._uiHeight / threadsPerBlock.y); CudaTransformAndAverageImage << < grid, threadsPerBlock >> > (pcPreRasteredImage_dyn, resultArray );
    – juergen861
    Jun 3, 2016 at 10:15

1 Answer 1

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This:

if((x<5)&&(y<5)) 
{
    resultArray [0]++; 
}

is a read after write hazard.

All of the threads which satisfy (x<5)&&(y<5) can potentially attempt simultaneous reads and writes from resultArray[0]. The CUDA execution model does not guarantee anything about the order of simultaneous memory transactions.

You could make this work by using atomic memory transactions, for example:

if((x<5)&&(y<5)) {
    atomicAdd(&resultArray[0], 1);
}

This will serialize the memory transactions and make the calculation correct. It will also have a big negative effect on performance.

You might want to investigate having each block calculate a local sum using a reduction type calculation and then sum the block local sums atomically or on the host, or in a second kernel.

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  • Thank You so much for Your advice! That really saved the day for a CUDA-newbie! :-)
    – juergen861
    Jun 6, 2016 at 6:20

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