7

I am SUPER new to ruby, and I am trying to following instructions on how to build a rectangle. I am following along as carefully as possible, I triple checked I typed it correctly. I even retyped it. The problem seems to be in the end. My terminal keeps giving me the error: shapes.rb:25: syntax error, unexpected end-of-input, expecting keyword_end

Can anyone help me? I think it might be an issue with the 1.upto, but i'm not sure. Thank you so much!!

    puts "Welcome to Shapes"
    print "How big do you want your shape? "
    shape_size = gets
    shape_size = shape_size.chomp
    print "Outside letter: "
    outside_letter = gets
    outside_letter = outside_letter.chomp
    print " Inside Letter: "
    inside_letter = gets
    inside_letter = inside_letter.chomp
    puts "About to draw a shape #{shape_size} big"
    puts "using #{outside_letter} for the edge"
    puts "and #{inside_letter} for the inside"
    width = shape_size
    height=shape_size
    1.upto(height) do |row|
    if row==1
        puts outside_letter * width
    elsif row==height
        puts outside_letter * width
    else
        middle= inside_letter * (width-2)
    puts
        "#{outside_letter}#{middle}#{outside_letter}"
    end
7
  • You are missing an end for do
    – Pavan
    Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 19:10
  • 4
    One of the first things you'll have to pay very close attention to when programming is indentation. Here you can't see a problem because you haven't indented blocks correctly.
    – tadman
    Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 20:15
  • I'd highly recommend reading catb.org/esr/faqs/smart-questions.html. We don't care if you're new, we expect you to research, put a lot of effort into solving the problem, then ask a well thought-out question. See "How to Ask" which also links to the above link. If you're having a problem with your code, then, in addition, read "minimal reproducible example". If you keep your code indented it'll be easier to see if there are problems with missing block ends or } and won't ask questions that are caused by a syntax error. Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 22:28
  • Tin Man, please don't be rude. I'm following along in a book, and that's how it's shown. I don't know anyone else as of yet that does this, so I went to a forum. If you don't care to take the time to answer my question or are angry because of the question asked, don't answer it. It's as simple as that. Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 22:31
  • @brianslattery thank you for taking the time to explain a few things. I appreciate it! Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

12

You need one more end:

puts "Welcome to Shapes"
print "How big do you want your shape? "
shape_size = gets
shape_size = shape_size.chomp
print "Outside letter: "
outside_letter = gets
outside_letter = outside_letter.chomp
print " Inside Letter: "
inside_letter = gets
inside_letter = inside_letter.chomp
puts "About to draw a shape #{shape_size} big"
puts "using #{outside_letter} for the edge"
puts "and #{inside_letter} for the inside"
width = shape_size
height=shape_size
1.upto(height) do |row|
  if row==1
    puts outside_letter * width
  elsif row==height
    puts outside_letter * width
  else
    middle= inside_letter * (width-2)
    puts
    "#{outside_letter}#{middle}#{outside_letter}"
  end
end # <--- here

Since you are learning here, I felt compelled to add more detail:

When you have a block, such as the 1.upto(height) do |row| in your code, that will always require an end, as it is a block (think of it like a unit of code). Within that block, you are executing the code for each item within the enumerable (ex. array). In this case, your enumerable is an array of each whole number between 1 and the value of height:

2.3.0 :005 > 1.upto(4) do |number|
2.3.0 :006 >     puts "The number is: #{number}"
2.3.0 :007?>   end
The number is: 1
The number is: 2
The number is: 3
The number is: 4
1
  • Please avoid inserting "Edit" or "Update". We have a revision history we can check if we need to see when something changed, that also shows us what changed. Instead add the change where it would have been originally. meta.stackexchange.com/a/127655/153968 explains it nicely. Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 22:32
2

Step 1: Fix Indenting To fix this, first fix your indenting. This will usually make it obvious where the end is missing. You can see where your indenting is off by using the warning flag when running your ruby program: e.g. ruby -w my_program.rb.

Step 2: Decipher the warning Look at the line numbers the warnings point to. From these, you may be able to figure out where your end is missing. If not, go to the next step.

Step 3: Isolate Code Causing Error If you're not able to figure out where the issue is due to the warnings, try commenting out chunks of code and seeing if you can get your program to run. Then uncomment and run your code chunk by chunk until the error returns. Using this method you'll be able to isolate where your end is missing.

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