10

I'm trying to design a numbering system around both unsigned integers and signed integers. Both of these types have an underlying value that represents the number in Scala's number system. Here is the type hierarchy I have so far.

sealed trait Number {
  def + (num : Number) : Number = ???
  def - (num : Number) : Number = ???
  def * (num : Number) : Number = ???
}

sealed trait SignedNumber extends Number

sealed trait UnsignedNumber extends Number

sealed trait UInt32 extends UnsignedNumber {
  def underlying : Long
}

sealed trait UInt64 extends UnsignedNumber {
  def underlying : BigInt
}

sealed trait Int32 extends SignedNumber {
  def underlying : Int
}

sealed trait Int64 extends SignedNumber {
  def underlying : Long
}

I would like to define underlying in the trait Number so the compiler can enforce that underlying is defined in all of the children. However, the types for underlying vary for each trait - I want to keep the smallest possible type for each type. For instance, a UInt32 can be stored as a long in Scala, while a UInt64 needs to be stored as a BigInt.

What is the most effective way to do this?

3

You can declare a type in the parent trait and override it in the subtraits.

sealed trait Number {
  type A
  def underlying: A
  def + (num : Number) : Number = ???
  def - (num : Number) : Number = ???
  def * (num : Number) : Number = ???
}

sealed trait SignedNumber extends Number

sealed trait UnsignedNumber extends Number

sealed trait UInt32 extends UnsignedNumber {
  override type A = Long
}

sealed trait UInt64 extends UnsignedNumber {
  override type A = BigInt
}

sealed trait Int32 extends SignedNumber {
  override type A = Int
}

sealed trait Int64 extends SignedNumber {
  override type A = Long
}

An example just to show use of the path-dependent type in case that isn't clear:

def getUnderlying(x: Number): x.A = x.underlying

To get the return types correct, I think another type might be required.

sealed trait Number {
  type A
  type B
  def underlying: A
  def +(that: B): B
}

sealed trait UInt32 extends Number { x =>
  override type A = Long
  override type B = UInt32
  override def +(y: B): B = new UInt32 {
    // todo - naive implementation, doesn't check overflow
    override val underlying = x.underlying + y.underlying
  }
}

def main(args: Array[String]) {
  print((
    new UInt32 { def underlying = 3 } +
    new UInt32 { def underlying = 4 }
  ).underlying)
}
3
  • So I thought about taking this approach - Ocaml uses this all the time in their modules. How would implement signatures on things such as +, -, *? Would you have the type A be returned for all of those functions? That leads to the question of how does the end user actually access the underlying type? Some function (a : A) : <underlying type here>? Jun 5 '16 at 21:14
  • Also does having underlying in a public scope undermine type encapsulation? I'm on the fence I guess... Jun 5 '16 at 21:16
  • Edited with some more thoughts. I guess you'll have to decide whether you want the underlying type/value to be exposed or not. I suppose you might also consider making a Number type class instead of using inheritance. Jun 5 '16 at 22:00
0

The most efficient way is to store the primitive numbers (Int Double...) as the raw type.

The unsignedness should be stored in a Type parameter, which will be erased at runtime. Scala does this when you let simple case classes extend AnyVal.

The folowing code does this for Ints, Longs, Doubles and Bigint. I added a few classifications in adition to unsigned and renamed unsigned to positive.

Also since the classification is all done in the type-system we do not need to provide as many overloaded + - and * functions. This will save space when trying to implement this for all the number types.

There is still a little to be done when bridging between the various types. I will have a look at this later.

The Classification traits:

sealed trait SignTag{
  type SubTag <:SignTag;
  type AddTag <:SignTag;
  type MultTag<:SignTag;
}

sealed trait Signed extends SignTag{
  type SubTag=Signed;
  type AddTag=Signed;
  type MultTag=Signed;
}

sealed trait Positive extends SignTag{
  type SubTag=Signed;
  type AddTag=Negative;
  type MultTag=Negative;
}

sealed trait Negative extends SignTag{
  type SubTag=Signed;
  type AddTag=Negative;
  type MultTag=Positive;
}

sealed trait Zero extends SignTag{
  type SubTag=Zero;
  type AddTag=Zero;
  type MultTag=Zero;
}

Int wrapper:

object SInt {
  @inline
  implicit def toSigned[T <: SignTag](int:SInt[T]):SInt[Signed]=int.asInstanceOf[SInt[Signed]];

  @inline implicit def toLong[T <: SignTag](int:SInt[T]):SLong[T]=SLong(int.underlying);
  @inline implicit def toDouble[T <: SignTag](int:SInt[T]):SDouble[T]=SDouble(int.underlying);
  @inline implicit def toBig[T <: SignTag](int:SInt[T]):SBigInt[T]=SBigInt(int.underlying);
}

case class SInt[T <: SignTag](val underlying:Int) extends AnyVal{
  def -(second: SInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SInt[T#SubTag]=new SInt[T#SubTag](underlying - second.underlying);

  def +(second: SInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SInt[T#AddTag]=new SInt[T#AddTag](underlying + second.underlying);

  def *(second: SInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SInt[T#MultTag]=new SInt[T#MultTag](underlying * second.underlying);

  def assertSameType(other:SInt[T])={};
}

Long wrapper:

object SLong {

  @inline
  implicit def toSigned[T <: SignTag](int:SLong[T]):SLong[Signed]=int.asInstanceOf[SLong[Signed]];

  @inline implicit def toDouble[T <: SignTag](int:SLong[T]):SDouble[T]=SDouble(int.underlying);
  @inline implicit def toBig[T <: SignTag](int:SLong[T]):SBigInt[T]=SBigInt(int.underlying);
}

case class SLong[T <: SignTag](val underlying:Long) extends AnyVal{
  def -(second: SLong[_ <: T#InTag]):SLong[T#SubTag]=new SLong[T#SubTag](underlying - second.underlying);

  def +(second: SLong[_ <: T#InTag]):SLong[T#AddTag]=new SLong[T#AddTag](underlying + second.underlying);

  def *(second: SLong[_ <: T#InTag]):SLong[T#MultTag]=new SLong[T#MultTag](underlying * second.underlying);

  def assertSameType(other:SLong[T])={};
}

Double wrapper:

object SDouble {
  @inline
  implicit def toSigned[T <: SignTag](int:SDouble[T]):SDouble[Signed]=int.asInstanceOf[SDouble[Signed]];
}

case class SDouble[T <: SignTag](val underlying:Double) extends AnyVal{
  def -(second: SDouble[_ <: T#InTag]):SDouble[T#SubTag]=new SDouble[T#SubTag](underlying - second.underlying);

  def +(second: SDouble[_ <: T#InTag]):SDouble[T#AddTag]=new SDouble[T#AddTag](underlying + second.underlying);

  def *(second: SDouble[_ <: T#InTag]):SDouble[T#MultTag]=new SDouble[T#MultTag](underlying * second.underlying);

  def assertSameType(other:SDouble[T])={};
}

BigInt wrapper:

object SBigInt {
  @inline
  implicit def toSigned[T <: SignTag](int:SLong[T]):SLong[Signed]=int.asInstanceOf[SLong[Signed]];

  @inline
  implicit def toDouble[T <: SignTag](int:SBigInt[T]):SDouble[T]=SDouble(int.underlying.toDouble);
}

case class SBigInt[T <: SignTag](val underlying:BigInt) extends AnyVal{
  def -(second: SBigInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SBigInt[T#SubTag]=new SBigInt[T#SubTag](underlying - second.underlying);

  def +(second: SBigInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SBigInt[T#AddTag]=new SBigInt[T#AddTag](underlying + second.underlying);

  def *(second: SBigInt[_ <: T#InTag]):SBigInt[T#MultTag]=new SBigInt[T#MultTag](underlying * second.underlying);

  def assertSameType(other:SBigInt[T])={};
}

Test the syntax:

class CompileToTest {
  val signed=new SInt[Signed](5);
  val positive=new SInt[Positive](5);
  val negative=new SInt[Negative](-5);
  val zero=new SInt[Zero](0);

  (signed + signed).assertSameType(signed);
  (negative + signed).assertSameType(signed);
  (positive - positive).assertSameType(signed);
  (positive * negative).assertSameType(signed);
  (zero + zero).assertSameType(zero);

  val positiveDouble=SDouble[Positive](4.4)
  val negativeDouble=SDouble[Negative](-4.4)
  val signedDouble=SDouble[Signed](-4.4)

  (positiveDouble * negativeDouble).assertSameType(signedDouble);
}

Ps. Haven't actually looked at the bytecode, but the docs sugests that this should be inlined and compiled down to primitives.

I just love this lanuage.

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