By default, ActiveRecord takes all fields from the corresponding database table and creates public attributes for all of them.

I think that it's reasonable not to make all attributes in a model public. Even more, exposing attributes that are meant for internal use clutters the model's interface and violates the encapsulation principle.

So, is there a way to make some of the attributes literally private?

Or, maybe I should move on to some other ORM?

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Jordini was most of the way there

Most of active_record happens in method_missing. If you define the method up front, it won't hit method_missing for that method, and use yours in stead (effectively overwriting, but not really)

class YourModel < ActiveRecord::Base

  private

  def my_private_attribute
    self[:my_private_attribute]
  end

  def my_private_attribute=(val)
    write_attribute :my_private_attribute, val
  end

end
  • 1
    Any reason why I wouldn't/couldn't use the following to accomplish this? private attr_accessor my_private_attribute – T C Jun 25 '12 at 23:59
  • 2
    @TC: because those won't actually track the attributes properly. the write_attribute / read_attribute methods are the way you interface with active_record – Matt Briggs Jun 27 '12 at 2:12
  • actually, write_attribute won't persist the value to DB. One would have to call self.save afterwards to actually update the record in the DB. – Magne Jan 11 '13 at 14:37
  • 2
    @Overflow012 you can also do your_model_instance.send(:my_private_attribute=, "foo"). Ruby takes the (sane) approach that the goal of privacy is an indicator of intent to other programmers, not as a lock that can never be broken. – Matt Briggs Aug 6 '13 at 20:27
  • 2
    def my_private_attribute; super end will do - no need to redefine it, then of course make it private as above or in my preferred way private :my_private_attribute – ryan2johnson9 Oct 28 '16 at 0:24

Stumbled upon this recently. If you want private writing and reading and public reading something like this

class YourModel < ActiveRecord::Base

  attr_reader :attribute

  private

  attr_accessor :attribute


end

seems to work fine for me. You can fiddle with attr_reader, attr_writer and attr_accessor to decide what should be exposed and what should be private.

  • 1
    I'm pretty sure that this won't work with regular AR attributes, since they are not stored in instance variables (which attr_* methods work with). – Leonid Shevtsov Aug 17 '11 at 10:29
  • 1
    I looked for this answer everywhere! Looks like it worked and was EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thanks! – ootoovak May 12 '12 at 2:43
  • From outside model I can do your_model_instance[:my_private_attribute] = "Foo" and change the attribute value. Very ugly! – Cristhian Boujon Aug 6 '13 at 2:49

well, you could always override the methods...

class YourModel < ActiveRecord::Base

  private

  def my_private_attribute
    self[:my_private_attribute]
  end

  def my_private_attribute=(val)
    self[:my_private_attribute] = val
  end

end
  • It seems that this gives an error when using update from the model class. – NicolasWebDev Aug 24 '16 at 20:09

You can make an existing method private:

YourClass.send(:private, :your_method)
  • 1
    this actually doesn't work with ActiveRecord unfortunately as the accessor methods are not actually defined, they're created with method_missing and a bit of meta programming. – brad May 13 '11 at 18:03

For me methods from both Otto and jordinl are working fine and make rspec for object of Class to pass:

object.should_not respond_to :attribute

But when I use jordinl method, I have a deprecation message to not write to database directly, but use attr_writer instead.

UPDATE:

But the truly "right" metod to do it turns out to be simple. Thanks to Mladen Jablanović and Christopher Creutzig from here. To make predefined method private or protected... simply redefine it:

Class Class_name

  private :method_name
  protected :method_name_1
end

What's important, you needn't rewrite previously defined method's logic.

Making the setting private does generate ActiveRecord error.

I put access control code in the overwritten method of the public setter by checking the caller:

def my_private_attribute=(val)
  if (caller.first.include?('active_record/base.rb') || caller.first.include?('app/models/myclass.rb'))
    self[:my_private_attribute] = val
  else
     raise Exception.new("Cannot set read-only attribute.")
  end
end

I don't think there is 100% reliable way to do this. It's also worth checking the most popular ways to access attributes:

http://www.davidverhasselt.com/set-attributes-in-activerecord/

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