This question already has an answer here:

This function lists all collections in a MongoDB database, with the number of documents in each collection (bluebird promises).

function listMongoCollections(db) {
    var promises = []
    db.listCollections().toArray().then((docs) => {

        docs.forEach((doc) => {

            promises.push(
                new Promise((resolve) => {
                    db.collection(doc.name).count().then((count) => {
                        doc.count = count
                        resolve()
                    })
                })
            )
        })

        return Promise.all(promises)
    })
}

Is there a simpler way to do this? Using this method will flood an app with code, and I haven't even included error handling.

marked as duplicate by Benjamin Gruenbaum javascript Jun 6 '16 at 13:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • You can try out Q. A tool for creating and composing asynchronous promises in JavaScript documentup.com/kriskowal/q – Rudra Jun 6 '16 at 10:39
  • I don't see Q doing anything bluebird can't – Pål Thingbø Jun 6 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    @PålThingbø as a contributor of both Q and Bluebird - I can confirm that statement. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '16 at 13:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do a few things:

  • use .map to transform an array of collections into an array of promises, instead of .pushing into an array manually.
  • avoid wrapping promises in new Promises.
  • nest .then as little as possible. In the following example, notice how the first part just returns an array of promises. Only before returning the main function we wrap it in an .all promise.
function listMongoCollections(db) {
    const docs = db.listCollections().toArray().then(docs => {
        return docs.map(doc => {
            return db.collection(doc.name).count().then(count => {
                doc.count = count
                return doc;
            });
        });
    });
    return Promise.all(docs);
}

You can "simplify" it further by removing the returns and the intermediate docs constant.

function listMongoCollections(db) {
    return Promise.all(
        db.listCollections().toArray().then(docs => 
            docs.map(doc => 
                db.collection(doc.name).count().then(count => {
                    doc.count = count
                    return doc;
                })
            )
        )
    );
}

And perhaps with async/await we can make it even easier to read (although I'm not too familiar with it):

async function listMongoCollections(db) {
    let docs = await db.listCollections().toArray();
    docs = docs.map(async doc => {
        doc.count = await db.collection(doc.name).count();
        return doc;
    });
    return Promise.all(docs);
}

These are just examples, Mongo might offer even better solutions.

  • 3
    Since these are Bluebird promises, you can use .map() and .all() (see this gist). – robertklep Jun 6 '16 at 12:27
  • 1
    Just a small critique, which is HIGHLY debatable, but IMO leaving out the returns definitely does not improve readability. At a quick glance it's as if the functions return nothing, until you realise there are no curly brackets. Anyway, this is probably more of a critique of the fat arrow syntax than your solution, but maybe you should add a note that the functions definitely DO have to return the promises. – Creynders Jun 6 '16 at 13:52
  • Totally, that's why I said and double-quoted "simplify", not "improve readability". 😊 Robert's gist in the comment is actually a better solution – bfred.it Jun 6 '16 at 14:43
  • This is by far the best answer I've seen for promise antipatterns, anywhere. Thank you. – Pål Thingbø Jun 6 '16 at 19:33

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