7

I am unclear on what is the best way to design a class with static methods that are meant to be overridable. I will try to explain with an example.


We have a class Goat with a method can_climb. (By the way this is Python 3, in Python 2 I would write class Goat(object):.)

class Goat:
    def __init__(self, *args):
        ...

    def can_climb(self, mountain):
        return mountain.steepness < 10

billy = Goat("Billy")
if billy.can_climb(mount_everest):
    print("wow Billy, impressive")

This works as intended, but the method can_climb doesn't use self. It seems cleaner to make it a static method, and pylint even gives a warning for the above method. So let's change that:

class Goat:
    def __init__(self, *args):
        ...

    @staticmethod
    def can_climb(mountain):
        return mountain.steepness < 10

billy = Goat("Billy")
if billy.can_climb(mount_everest):
    print("wow Billy, impressive")

billy.can_climb near the end can instead be Goat.can_climb and it won't make a difference in this example. Some people might even see it as being clearer and more direct to call a static method via its class and not an instance.

However, this leads to a subtle error when we use inheritance and polymorphism is introduced:

class Goat:
    def __init__(self, *args):
        ...

    @staticmethod
    def can_climb(mountain):
        return mountain.steepness < 10

class MountaineeringGoat(Goat):
    @staticmethod
    def can_climb(mountain):
        return True

billy = get_ourselves_a_goat_called_billy()
if Goat.can_climb(mount_everest):     # bug
    print("wow Billy, impressive")

The code that calls Goat.can_climb knows that billy is an instance of Goat and makes the erroneous assumption that its type is Goat, when it could really be any subtype of Goat. Or maybe it incorrectly assumes that subclasses won't override a static method.

This seems to me like an easy mistake to make; perhaps Goat didn't have any subclasses at the time this bug was introduced, so the bug was not noticed.


How can we design and document a class so that this sort of bug is avoided? In particular, should can_climb from this example be a static method or should something else be used instead?

  • 3
    You've already demonstrated how to avoid the bug; unless you need a specific class, call methods (and attributes) on the instance. And have unit tests that detect functionality regressions. – jonrsharpe Jun 6 '16 at 14:13
  • I'm not yet convinced that my design is the best design. Perhaps I should really use an instance method? – flornquake Jun 6 '16 at 14:39
  • @jonrsharpe I'm looking for ways to avoid this problem from the class's side rather than the caller's side if that is possible. – flornquake Jun 6 '16 at 14:46
  • 3
    You can't, if the caller explicitly selects the class, that is what (and should!) get called, there's nothing to fix. Even if you make it an instance method, the caller could still do Goat.can_climb(billy, ...). As for the "best design", that's hard to say with an abstract example and at least partly opinion based. – jonrsharpe Jun 6 '16 at 15:02
14

Inheritance clearly means a knowledge of the base class. @staticmethod is ignorant of the class it is 'attached' to(hence they earlier-not now-a-days-called it 'unbound;' now technically @staticmethod is not a method at all; it is a function.

But @classmethod is fully aware of the class it is attached to; it is technically not a function, but a method.

Why then @staticmethod at all? It is inherited in a derived class, but as said earlier, without the knowledge of base class; we can use it 'as such' as if we have defined it in the derived class.

Non-technically speaking @classmethods are 'bounded'; @staticmethods are NOT.

Had anybody asked me I would have suggested the name @staticfunction for @staticmethod.

Additionally, to ensure that the latest staticmethod is called, you may use type(billy).can_climb(mountain) or billy.__class__.can_climb(mountain) (although type(billy) is more pythonic it seems), which calls the staticmethod from billy's (sub)class. If it's not overridden, it would use the base-classe's staticmethod.

  • 1
    Since you mentioned more than once, can you describe what is technical difference between method and function? – Ali Faizan Jul 24 '17 at 16:13
  • @ali A function is class-less, a method is a function inside of a class. This is a language agnostic CompSci thing – Jonathan Oct 20 '18 at 20:06
  • 1
    I think you meant @classmethod instead of @staticfunction at the end. Also, @staticmethod is not inherited nor does it have access to the class members. – whitey04 Apr 23 '19 at 20:26
  • @whitey04 I just created a subclass for a class that has @staticmethod in it, and this subclass did inherit the method wrapped in staticmethod in the base class. – Sergey Zakharov Nov 22 '19 at 11:25

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