107

I need to check in ConfigureServices method whether the current hosting environment name is 'Development'.

So using IHostingEnvironment.IsDevelopment() method may be ok for me, but unlike in Configure method, I do not have IHostingEnvironment env.

134

just create a property in the Startup class to persist the IHostingEnvironment. Set the property in the Startup constructor where you already have access, then you can access the property from ConfigureServices

5
  • 37
    Even though the new project templates for Asp.Net Core 2.0 don't include the parameter "IHostingEnvironment env" in the Startup constructor, it can be specified and it will be properly injected. – Augusto Barreto Aug 11 '17 at 1:27
  • 3
    Why in ConfigureServices it is impossible? – Alexsandro Mar 27 '18 at 21:41
  • 2
    @Alexsandro_xpt to document the answer to your question on ConfigureServices, it's impossible because the framework doesn't support Dependency Injection for that particular method the way it does in other areas (probably because you use this method to configure dependency injection). Setting at the constructor level as Joe described should work around the issue. – Matt Eland Sep 6 '18 at 3:17
  • @MarkG Unfortunately that answer is deleted... the its Q having been marked as a duplicate of this one. So including here... – Richard Feb 25 '19 at 9:31
  • As of .NET 5 IHostingEnvironment is deprecated and you'll want to use IWebHostEnvironment instead. – Mike Mar 7 at 17:33
35

Copied here from question marked as duplicate of this one and deleted. Credit to a-ctor.

If you want to access IHostingEnvironment in ConfigureServices you will have to inject it via the constructor and store it for later access in ConfigureServices:

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration, IHostingEnvironment environment)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
        Environment = environment;
    }

    public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }

    public IHostingEnvironment Environment { get; }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddMvc();

        System.Console.WriteLine($"app: {Environment.ApplicationName}");
    }

    // rest omitted
}
5
  • Hi, it's not a big deal but in the string formatting the environment is lower case, whereas the property seems to be Environment. – timmi4sa Oct 27 '19 at 15:27
  • 1
    @BenSmith I believe you have a typo. You repeated IHostingEnvironment in your statement "IHostingEnvironment is now obsolete and IHostingEnvironment should be used instead. What is the correct replacement for IHostingEnvironment? – Blake Oct 30 '19 at 13:49
  • Doh! Good spot @Blake. I'll delete my previous comment. My comment should've read "IHostingEnvironment is now obsolete, IWebHostEnvironment should be used instead". – Ben Smith Oct 30 '19 at 14:21
  • And to be extra clear, shouldn't it be said that IHostingEnvironment is only obsolete as of .Net Core 3.0? (I'm working on a 'take home test' that calls services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_2); inside the ConfigureServices() method and IHostingEnvironment is working fine. – Scott Fraley Nov 16 '19 at 21:09
  • @ScottFraley correct. As this question and answer comes from the .NET Core 2.x time-frame (which a lot of projects will continue to be using for quite some time) it does still apply. – Richard Nov 17 '19 at 7:38
4

IHostingEnvironment is deprecated in Core 3.1

        private readonly IWebHostEnvironment _env;
   
        public Startup(IConfiguration configuration, IWebHostEnvironment env)
        {
            _env = env;
            Configuration = configuration;
        }

should do the trick...

Then reference anywhere with _env.IsDevelopment() etc...

1

If you aren't using a Startup class and are calling .Configure() directly, you can access the IHostingEnvironment or IWebHostEnvironment using GetService:

ASP.NET Core 2.2:

.Configure(app => {
    var hostingEnvironment = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<IHostingEnvironment>();
    if (hostingEnvironment?.IsDevelopment() == true)
    {
        app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
    }

    // .. Other stuff
});

ASP.NET Core 3.x:

.Configure(app => {
    var hostingEnvironment = app.ApplicationServices.GetService<IWebHostEnvironment>();
    if (hostingEnvironment?.IsDevelopment() == true)
    {
        app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
    }

    // .. Other stuff
});
0

If you don't have a Startup class (you may be creating a service) you can get the environment from the hostContext in ConfigureServices like so:

 public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
            Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
                .ConfigureServices((hostContext, services) =>
                {
                    IConfiguration config = hostContext.Configuration;
                    Configuration = config;

                    var env = hostContext.HostingEnvironment;
                    EnvironmentName = env?.EnvironmentName;

...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.