I have installed the GPU version of tensorflow on an Ubuntu 14.04.

I am on a GPU server where tensorflow can access the available GPUs.

I want to run tensorflow on the CPUs.

Normally I can use env CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES=0 to run on GPU no. 0.

How can I pick between the CPUs instead?

I am not intersted in rewritting my code with with tf.device("/cpu:0"):

up vote 75 down vote accepted

You can apply device_count parameter per tf.Session:

config = tf.ConfigProto(
        device_count = {'GPU': 0}
    )
sess = tf.Session(config=config)

See also protobuf config file:

tensorflow/core/framework/config.proto

  • 2
    Someone said running neural nets on CPUs after the training phase is as efficient as running them on GPUs -- i.e., only the training phrase really needs the GPU. Do you know if this is true? Thanks! – Crashalot Nov 7 '16 at 19:03
  • this works for me. very simple – ArtificiallyIntelligence Nov 23 '16 at 3:37
  • 3
    That doesn't work for me (tf1.1). The solution of fabrizioM does. – P-Gn May 29 '17 at 14:42
  • 1
    Isn't it better to use CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES environment variable instead of changing the config in the code? – Nandeesh Jun 30 '17 at 15:22
  • 1
    @Nandeesh I guess it depends on your needs. So far there are at least 53 people who feel more into environment variables and 35 who prefer to set number of devices in code. The advantage of first is simplicity and of another is more explicit control over (multiple) sessions from within the python program itself (that zero is not necessary to be hardcoded, it can be a variable). – Ivan Aksamentov - Drop Jun 30 '17 at 16:58

You can also set the environment variable to

CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES=""

without having to modify the source code.

  • 1
    ^^ This is the right answer. – Hugh Perkins Sep 20 '16 at 16:45
  • 2
    Someone said running neural nets on CPUs after the training phase is as performant as running them on GPUs -- i.e., only the training phrase really needs the GPU. Do you know if this is true? Thanks! – Crashalot Nov 7 '16 at 19:03
  • 7
    @Crashalot: This is not true. Look for various benchmarks for interference, CPUs are an order of magnitude slower there too. – Thomas Nov 17 '16 at 13:58
  • 1
    @Thomas thanks. suggestions on which benchmarks to consider? probably also varies on workload and nature of the neural nets, right? apparently the google translate app runs some neural nets directly on smartphones, presumably on the cpu and not gpu? – Crashalot Nov 17 '16 at 19:44
  • 4
    This did not work for me. :/ set the environment variable but tensorflow still uses the GPU, I'm using conda virtual env, does this make a diference? – Guilherme de Lazari Aug 6 '17 at 15:56

If the above answers doesn't work, try either:

os.environ['CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES'] = ''

or

os.environ['CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES'] = '-1'
  • 2
    Thanks, this is much better than other options. – user1098761 Jan 11 at 5:51
  • This is the correct answer – Amir Oct 14 at 17:50

Just using the code below.

import os
os.environ["CUDA_DEVICE_ORDER"] = "PCI_BUS_ID"
os.environ['CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES'] = '-1'

For me, only setting CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES to precisely -1 works:

Works:

import os
import tensorflow as tf

os.environ['CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES'] = '-1'

if tf.test.gpu_device_name():
    print('GPU found')
else:
    print("No GPU found")

# No GPU found

Does not work:

import os
import tensorflow as tf

os.environ['CUDA_VISIBLE_DEVICES'] = ''    

if tf.test.gpu_device_name():
    print('GPU found')
else:
    print("No GPU found")

# GPU found

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