I need to load a table with a large amount of test data. This is to be used for testing performance and scaling.

How can I easily create 100,000 rows of random/junk data for my database table?

  • Do you have the test data already or are you going to have to generate it? – NullUserException Sep 22 '10 at 4:25
  • What is your table structure? and what language to use ? – codaddict Sep 22 '10 at 4:28
  • No i dont have any test data, its generating it that i;m looking for a solution to . – Mohammad Umair Sep 22 '10 at 4:43
  • I have 4tables that i'm joining whihc will each have about a millio records and i need to test my query performance for which i have to fill these tables with test data rigth now. – Mohammad Umair Sep 22 '10 at 4:45

You could also use a stored procedure. Consider the following table as an example:

CREATE TABLE your_table (id int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, val int);

Then you could add a stored procedure like this:

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE prepare_data()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 100;

  WHILE i < 100000 DO
    INSERT INTO your_table (val) VALUES (i);
    SET i = i + 1;
  END WHILE;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

When you call it, you'll have 100k records:

CALL prepare_data();
  • very nice solution .. i was thinking to write a for loop for it. – Mohammad Umair Sep 22 '10 at 4:51
  • Are you sure it would work for MySQL? I never seen WHILE in MySQL queries. – stack Sep 11 '16 at 1:58
  • its good but we need some mean full data with some more columns in data. – Indrajeet Gour Dec 26 '16 at 6:35
  • 2
    when you're done DROP PROCEDURE prepare_data – dw1 Apr 17 at 10:49
  • Btw. it only creates 99900 records ;) ... – fritzmg Jun 9 at 7:59

For multiple row cloning (data duplication) you could use

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE insert_test_data()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 1;

  WHILE i < 100000 DO
    INSERT INTO `table` (`user_id`, `page_id`, `name`, `description`, `created`)
    SELECT `user_id`, `page_id`, `name`, `description`, `created`
    FROM `table`
    WHERE id = 1;
    SET i = i + 1;
  END WHILE;
END$$
DELIMITER ;
CALL insert_test_data();
DROP PROCEDURE insert_test_data;

If you want more control over the data, try something like this (in PHP):

<?php
$conn = mysql_connect(...);
$num = 100000;

$sql = 'INSERT INTO `table` (`col1`, `col2`, ...) VALUES ';
for ($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++) {
  mysql_query($sql . generate_test_values($i));
}
?>

where function generate_test_values would return a string formatted like "('val1', 'val2', ...)". If this takes a long time, you can batch them so you're not making so many db calls, e.g.:

for ($i = 0; $i < $num; $i += 10) {
  $values = array();
  for ($j = 0; $j < 10; $j++) {
    $values[] = generate_test_data($i + $j);
  }
  mysql_query($sql . join(", ", $values));
}

would only run 10000 queries, each adding 10 rows.

  • Delay the loops a little; to avoid MySQL Server has gone away - errors, if in case you get them. – Bimal Poudel Sep 11 '16 at 5:43
  • Just note that this answer is quite old. mysql_connect() is deprecated and no longer available in PHP 7. – Simon East Oct 16 '17 at 21:36

Here it's solution with pure math and sql:

create table t1(x int primary key auto_increment);
insert into t1 () values (),(),();

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 1265 rows affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 1265  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 2530 rows affected (0.02 sec)
Records: 2530  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 5060 rows affected (0.03 sec)
Records: 5060  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 10120 rows affected (0.05 sec)
Records: 10120  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 20240 rows affected (0.12 sec)
Records: 20240  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 40480 rows affected (0.17 sec)
Records: 40480  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 80960 rows affected (0.31 sec)
Records: 80960  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 161920 rows affected (0.57 sec)
Records: 161920  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 323840 rows affected (1.13 sec)
Records: 323840  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into t1 (x) select x + (select count(*) from t1) from t1;
Query OK, 647680 rows affected (2.33 sec)
Records: 647680  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0
  • Does your table only have a single column? I like the concept of just duplicating existing rows, but your query may need tweaking somewhat to use additional columns. You should also be able to insert NULL to cover the AUTO_INCREMENT columns. – Simon East Oct 16 '17 at 21:33

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.