24

Why does it work to return an int in the method B minus if the method is supposed to return an object of type B?

#include <iostream>

class B
{
public:
    int a;
public:
    B(int i=0)
    {
        a=i;
    }
    B minus()
    {
        return (1-a);
    }
};

int main()
{
    B x(18);
    x = x.minus();
    std::cout << x.a << '\n';
    return 0;
}
  • 16
    You didn't mark your constructor explicit. – user2357112 supports Monica Jun 6 '16 at 17:33
  • 3
    Look at your B constructor. How are B's constructed? – PaulMcKenzie Jun 6 '16 at 17:34
  • I assume since the constructor takes int, it implicitly constructs from int, as well. – Kenny Ostrom Jun 6 '16 at 17:35
  • Read this to see how the explicit keyword works. – martijnn2008 Jun 6 '16 at 17:37
52

A constructor with a single argument is considered a converting constructor. When an argument of type X is needed, and a type Y is given instead, the compiler will look for a converting constructor (or a type conversion operator) from Y to X. In this case it finds one, using your B(int) constructor. In essence, your return (1-a); is changed to return B(1-a);.

As mentioned in several other (also correct) answers, if you do not wish the constructor to be considered a converting constructor, you should preface it with the explicit keyword.

27

The line

return (1-a);

calls the implicit conversion constructor

B(int i=0)
{
    a=i;
}

So it's the same as writing

return B(1-a);

Note that the copy constructor is still generated, unless you delete it.


If you want to avoid that, write

   explicit B(int i=0)
// ^^^^^^^^
   {
       a=i;
   }

this will actually force a user to write

return B(1-a);
13

This is happening because single-argument constructor can be used as an implicit cast from argument type to object type.

In your case, you have a constructor which accepts an argument of type int, so this constructor can be used to convert int into B.

To prevent those constructors to be used in conversion, you should mark constructor explicit - and it's a good practice to do so for all single-argument constructors, since in practice those implicit conversions are more often undesired than desired.

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