I am rewriting Java code as C++ code and am having a problem duplicating Java's priority queue..

The Java priority queue's compare function looks like the following:

  public int compareTo(Item that) {
    if (this.dist < that.dist)
      return -1;
    if (this.dist > that.dist)
      return 1;
    return 0;
  }

and I made a compare function in C++, however it is not working correctly:

struct cmp
{
    bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2)
    {
        if(it1.dist > it2.dist)
            return true;
    }
};

it is my c++ code priority queue

I call priority queue like this

priority_queue<Item, vector<Item>, cmp> que;

but, Java's order and C++'s order is different..

help me please

If this is not enough example code, I can provide my whole code. Java and C++ code

  • 2
    bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2) In C++, pass by const reference, not by value. Don't use Java as a model in writing C++ code. bool operator()(const Item& it1, const Item& it2) – PaulMcKenzie Jun 6 '16 at 18:28
  • C++ version implements strict weak ordering, so it basically cannot handle values of equal priority. Java version can handle equal priority, but will return values of equal priority in arbitrary order (not FIFO or LIFO), so it's generally best not to have values of equal priority. If you don't have values of equal priority, then yes, you can convert. – Andreas Jun 6 '16 at 18:29
  • @Andreas: std::priority_queue handles equal values just fine. – Benjamin Lindley Jun 6 '16 at 18:54
  • @Andreas: If it needs to, yes. Usually, it doesn't need to, since the relative order of equal elements is unspecified, so it's fine to assume that a can be placed after b if !(a < b). – Benjamin Lindley Jun 6 '16 at 19:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Define your comparison operator as

struct cmp
{
    bool operator()(const Item & it1, const Item & it2)    // pass by a const reference
    {
        return it1.dist > it2.dist;
    }
};

You can also define it as a free function.

  • i fix them but it has infinity loop haha.. it seems not priority problem thank you~~ – Park Yeoung Jun Jun 6 '16 at 18:40
  • @ParkYeoungJun Maybe you can post it as another question. – Shreevardhan Jun 6 '16 at 18:41
struct cmp
{
    bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2)
    {
        if(it1.dist > it2.dist)
            return true;
    }
};

The if check should ideally be reversed:

if ( it1.dist < it2.dist)

Since priority_queue expects something that is equivalent to std::less.

Further, you can simply return:

bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2)
{
    return  it1.dist < it2.dist;
}

Importantly, the Item argument must ideally be const and by-reference:

bool operator()(const Item& it1, const Item& it2)
{
    return  it1.dist < it2.dist;
}

If you are using C++11 or higher compiler (which I presume), you can simply use lambdas instead of struct having operator() defined. See this answer

It seems you don't set a condition to 'return false' in C++ cmp

struct cmp
{
    bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2)
    {
        if(it1.dist > it2.dist)
            return true;
        else 
            return false
    }
};

you need to fix your returned value:

struct cmp
{
    bool operator()(Item it1, Item it2)
    {
        return (it1.dist > it2.dist)

    }
};

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