I would like to create a map showing local spatial cluster of a phenomenon, preferably using Local Moran (LISA).

In the reproducible example below, I calculate the local moran's index using spdep but I would like to know if there is as simple way to map the clustes, prefebly using ggplot2. Help ?

library(UScensus2000tract)
library(ggplot2)
library(spdep)

# load data
data("oregon.tract")

# plot Census Tract map
plot(oregon.tract)

# create  Queens contiguity matrix
spatmatrix <- poly2nb(oregon.tract)

#calculate the local moran of the distribution of black population
lmoran <- localmoran(oregon.tract@data$black, nb2listw(spatmatrix))

Now to make this example more similar to my real dataset, I have some NA values in my shape file, which represent holes in the polygon, so these areas shouldn't be used in the calculation.

oregon.tract@data$black[3:5] <- NA

Here is a strategy:

library(UScensus2000tract)
library(spdep)
library(ggplot2)
library(dplyr)

# load data
data("oregon.tract")
# plot Census Tract map
plot(oregon.tract)

# create  Queens contiguity matrix
spatmatrix <- poly2nb(oregon.tract)

# create a neighbours list with spatial weights
listw <- nb2listw(spatmatrix)

# calculate the local moran of the distribution of white population
lmoran <- localmoran(oregon.tract$white, listw)
summary(lmoran)

# padronize the variable and save it to a new column
oregon.tract$s_white <- scale(oregon.tract$white)  %>% as.vector()

# create a spatially lagged variable and save it to a new column
oregon.tract$lag_s_white <- lag.listw(listw, oregon.tract$s_white)

# summary of variables, to inform the analysis
summary(oregon.tract$s_white)
summary(oregon.tract$lag_s_white)

# moran sccaterplot, in basic graphics (with identification of influential observations)
x <- oregon.tract$s_white
y <- oregon.tract$lag_s_white %>% as.vector()
xx <- data_frame(x, y)

moran.plot(x, listw)

# moran sccaterplot, in ggplot 
# (without identification of influential observations - which is possible but requires more effort)
ggplot(xx, aes(x, y)) + geom_point() + geom_smooth(method = 'lm', se = F) + geom_hline(yintercept = 0, linetype = 'dashed') + geom_vline(xintercept = 0, linetype = 'dashed') 

# create a new variable identifying the moran plot quadrant for each observation, dismissing the non-significant ones
oregon.tract$quad_sig <- NA

# high-high quadrant
oregon.tract[(oregon.tract$s_white >= 0 & 
                 oregon.tract$lag_s_white >= 0) & 
                (lmoran[, 5] <= 0.05), "quad_sig"] <- "high-high"
# low-low quadrant
oregon.tract[(oregon.tract$s_white <= 0 & 
                 oregon.tract$lag_s_white <= 0) & 
                (lmoran[, 5] <= 0.05), "quad_sig"] <- "low-low"
# high-low quadrant
oregon.tract[(oregon.tract$s_white >= 0 & 
                 oregon.tract$lag_s_white <= 0) & 
                (lmoran[, 5] <= 0.05), "quad_sig"] <- "high-low"
# low-high quadrant
oregon.tract@data[(oregon.tract$s_white <= 0 
               & oregon.tract$lag_s_white >= 0) & 
                (lmoran[, 5] <= 0.05), "quad_sig"] <- "low-high"
# non-significant observations
oregon.tract@data[(lmoran[, 5] > 0.05), "quad_sig"] <- "not signif."  

oregon.tract$quad_sig <- as.factor(oregon.tract$quad_sig)
oregon.tract@data$id <- rownames(oregon.tract@data)

# plotting the map
df <- fortify(oregon.tract, region="id")
df <- left_join(df, oregon.tract@data)
df %>% 
  ggplot(aes(long, lat, group = group, fill = quad_sig)) + 
  geom_polygon(color = "white", size = .05)  + coord_equal() + 
  theme_void() + scale_fill_brewer( palette = "Set1")

This answer was based on this page, suggested by Eli Knaap on twitter, and also borrowed from the answer by @timelyportfolio to this question.

I used the variable white instead of black because black had less explicit results.

Concerning NAs, localmoran() includes the argument na.action, about which the documentation says:

na.action is a function (default na.fail), can also be na.omit or > na.exclude - in these cases the weights list will be subsetted to remove NAs in the data. It may be necessary to set zero.policy to TRUE because this subsetting may create no-neighbour observations. Note that only weights lists created without using the glist argument to nb2listw may be subsetted. If na.pass is used, zero is substituted for NA values in calculating the spatial lag.

I tried:

oregon.tract@data$white[3:5] <- NA
lmoran <- localmoran(oregon.tract@data$white, listw, zero.policy = TRUE, 
                 na.action = na.exclude)

But run into problems in lag.listw and did not have time to look into it. Sorry.

  • @rafa.pereira, I hope it helps. – lincolnfrias Jun 13 '16 at 21:59
  • I giving you the bounty because your answer is the closest to what I wanted, although not quite there. – rafa.pereira Jun 15 '16 at 18:35

I don't think this answer is worthy of a bounty, but perhaps it will get you closer to an answer. Since I don't know anything about localmoran, I just guessed at a fill.

library(UScensus2000tract)
library(ggplot2)
library(spdep)

# load data
data("oregon.tract")

# plot Census Tract map
plot(oregon.tract)

# create  Queens contiguity matrix
spatmatrix <- poly2nb(oregon.tract)

#calculate the local moran of the distribution of black population
lmoran <- localmoran(oregon.tract@data$black, nb2listw(spatmatrix))

# get our id from the rownames in a data.frame
oregon.tract@data$id <- rownames(oregon.tract@data)
oregon.tract@data$lmoran_ii <- lmoran[,1]
oregon_df <- merge(
  # convert to a data.frame
  fortify(oregon.tract, region="id"),
  oregon.tract@data, 
  by="id"
)

ggplot(data=oregon_df, aes(x=long,y=lat,group=group)) +
  geom_polygon(fill=scales::col_numeric("Blues",domain=c(-1,5))(oregon_df$lmoran_ii)) +
  geom_path(color="white")
  • Thank you @timelyportfolio. That's already useful but it still doesn't overcome the issue with NA values that represent empty areas of the polygon. It also needs to address the identification of the clusters high-high, high-low, low-high, low-low and not-significant. Something similar to this – rafa.pereira Jun 8 '16 at 22:38

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