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I'd like to use a regex in grep+perl, in order to select unclosed java statements within a finally clause.

The pattern I came up with is supposed to select all .submitBacth(); which are not preceded by a finally {

However the negative look behind doesn't seem to be right or working as expected as all matches are returned.

myself@mymachine:~/Desktop$ grep -C 3 -P '(?s)(?<!finally\s\{.).*?\.submitBatch\(\)\;' ~/myfile.txt

Sample text (myfile.txt):

        //sample text
        batch.addToBatchUpdate(item1);
    }
    batch.submitBatch();
    dao.update(item2);
    //another text
} finally {

--

        }
    }
} finally {
    impl.submitBatch();
    test.close();
}

Expected output should be:

                //sample text
                batch.addToBatchUpdate(item1);
            }
            batch.submitBatch();
            dao.update(item2);
            //anotehr text
        } finally {

I'd have expected to see only the first entry batch.submitBatch(); but as you can see both are returned.

  • 3
    Please carify your question with appropriate input strings and the desired output strings. – Jan Jun 7 '16 at 10:11
  • 2
    Regular expressions are probably the wrong choice for parsing a contextual language. They simply cannot do it. – Sobrique Jun 7 '16 at 10:11
  • Practically the same answered in this post – zdim Jun 7 '16 at 18:11
1

In Perl you can use

$regex_new = /( (?:finally\s+\{\s+|.) )(\S+\.submitBatch\(\)\; ) /sx;

to extract substrings with .submitBatch from the file. If the first capture group ( the content of $1 ) starts with finally you can ignore that match (since you wanted to exclude those matches).

Regarding your original regex,

$regex = /( (?<!finally\s\{.) .*? \.submitBatch\(\)\; )/sx;

what is the problem here? It will match much more than needed, and it will be difficult to extract the matches that you are looking for.

For example:

use feature qw(say state);
use strict;
use warnings;

use Term::ANSIColor;

my $str = do { local $/; <DATA> };
my $regex = /( (?<!finally\s\{.) .*? \.submitBatch\(\)\; )/sx;
$str =~ s/$regex/color_match( $1 )/ge;
say $str;

sub color_match {
    state $i = 0;
    state $colors = [qw[red green blue]];
    return color( "bold " . $colors->[$i++] ) . $_[0] . color("reset");
}

__DATA__
         ... code ...
       } finally {
         impl.submitBatch();
         test.close();
     }
     batch.addToBatchUpdate(item1);
  }
  batch.submitBatch();
  dao.update(item2);
  //another text
} finally {
  impl.submitBatch();
  test.close();
}

The output is:

enter image description here

So each match ends with .submitBatch(); but the negative look-behind assertion (?<!finally\s\{.) matches immediately for each iteration of g modifier. For example, for the first iteration it matches at the beginning of the file and then .*? matches all up until the first .submitBatch(); and that completes the first iteration ( no need for backtracking). Similarly for the other matches.

If we replace $regex with $regex_new, the output will be:

enter image description here

Now it is easy to exclude the false matches. For example, you can use the e modifier:

$str =~ s/$regex/fix_missing_finally_clause( $1, $2)/ge;

where ( for example ) :

sub fix_missing_finally_clause {
    if ($_[0] =~ /^finally/ ) {
        return $_[0].$_[1];
    }  
    else {
        # Insert your edits here... for example:
        return "finally {\n" . $_[0] . $_[1] . "\n\t}\n";
    }
}
1

Thanks for the detailed answer Håkon, but I prefer to use the perl extension from grep as I have other regex in place and I don't want to rewrite the all script in perl (I like to keep my script as tidy as possible), even though might be easier. I finally managed to fix the regex with this one, which also takes care to look in between the method signature amd the method which I am interested.

I know that the regex selects too much, but I am not an expert and I am not interested in substitution, so as long as there is a match for me it is enough.

myself@mymachine:~$grep -Pzo '(?s)(?<=public|private|protected).(?<!finally).*?\.submitBatch\(\)\;' /tmp/test.java
     method
    //sample text
            batch.addToBatchUpdate(item1);
        }
        batch.submitBatch();

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