86

I have this PSObject (from XML):

bool : {IsActive, ShowOnB2C, ShowOnB2B, IsWebNews}
str  : {id, ProductId, GroupName, Unit...}
int  : {ProductIdNumeric, Prices_SalesOne, Prices_Treater, Prices_B2C...}
arr  : {EnvironmentBrands, Catalogs, NavisionLevels}
long : long

I would like to iterate over the properties without using the property names, for instance bool.

I have tried to index into the object like this:

$document[0]

But that gives me nothing, but it does not cause any errors either.

Select-Object kind of works, but then I have to use the property names, and I don't want that.

$documents | Select-Object bool,str

ForEach do not iterate the properties.

$documents | ForEach {
    $_.name
}

returns doc and that is the name of the tag (XML) holding the bools, ints, and strings.

1
  • You might have a look at Get-Member cmdlet.
    – stej
    Jun 7, 2016 at 20:29

5 Answers 5

154

This is possible using the intrinisc member PSObject (see also):

$documents.PSObject.Properties | ForEach-Object {
    $_.Name
    $_.Value
}

This won't work with certain PowerShell-created objects (PSObjects) that contain "NoteProperties" (properties of type NoteProperty).

See this answer for a method that covers all property types.

5
  • 1
    $documents.PSObject.Properties | ForEach-Object iterates the original object although $documents is a subset of the original XML object $documents = $responseContent.ChildNodes.result.doc Jun 8, 2016 at 19:09
  • 1
    This won't work for PSCustomObjects that have NoteProperty members instead of Property members like the object output from a cmdlet. You have to use the get-member syntax shown in the other answer below to cover all variations of object properties.
    – Blaisem
    Nov 9, 2021 at 22:25
  • 1
    Thanks @Blaisem I've updated this answer with a link to the other.
    – briantist
    Nov 10, 2021 at 13:25
  • Thank you, the hidden property was killing me.
    – Eric Nord
    Oct 10, 2022 at 23:03
  • The .PSObject is an intrinsic member and is documented here: about_intrinsic_members
    – Ole
    Jul 10, 2023 at 9:29
30

I prefer using foreach to loop through PowerShell objects:

foreach($object_properties in $obj.PsObject.Properties)
{
    # Access the name of the property
    $object_properties.Name

    # Access the value of the property
    $object_properties.Value
}

Generally, foreach has higher performance than Foreach-Object.

And yes, foreach is actually different than Foreach-Object under the hood.

17

You might need NoteProperty too with Get-Member.

$documents | Get-Member -membertype property,noteproperty | 
  Foreach name

EDIT: type "properties" seems a more generic catchall

$documents | get-member -type properties | % name

EDIT: dump out all the values:

$obj = ls test.ps1
$obj | Get-Member -Type properties | foreach name | 
  foreach { $_ + ' = ' + $obj.$_ }

Attributes = Normal
CreationTime = 06/01/2019 11:29:03
CreationTimeUtc = 06/01/2019 15:29:03
Directory = /Users/js
DirectoryName = /Users/js
Exists = True
Extension = .ps1
FullName = /Users/js/test.ps1
IsReadOnly = False
LastAccessTime = 06/05/2019 23:19:01
LastAccessTimeUtc = 06/06/2019 03:19:01
LastWriteTime = 06/01/2019 11:29:03
LastWriteTimeUtc = 06/01/2019 15:29:03
Length = 55
Name = test.ps1

An alternative way without "| foreach name", that needs extra parentheses:

$obj | Get-Member -Type properties | 
  foreach { $_.name + ' = ' + $obj.($_.name) }

Another take which results in an array that's easier to work with, and might be good for objects converted from json:

$a = '{ prop1:1, prop2:2, prop3:3 }' | convertfrom-json     
$a

prop1 prop2 prop3
----- ----- -----
    1     2     3

$a.PSObject.Properties | select name,value

name  value
----  -----
prop1     1
prop2     2
prop3     3
1
  • 1
    This is the general answer. The $object.psobject.properties only works with objects output from a cmdlet. PSCustomObjects use NoteProperties and will require the | gm -MemberType NoteProperty syntax, or -MemberType properties which will work for objects with either properties or noteproperties.
    – Blaisem
    Nov 9, 2021 at 22:23
7

Like stej mentioned, there is the Get-Member cmdlet with a -MemberType parameter you can use:

$documents | Get-Member -MemberType Property | ForEach-Object {
    $_.Name
}
2
  • How do you get the value with get-member?
    – Brain2000
    Jan 23, 2019 at 17:47
  • @Brain2000 You could parse it from $_.Definition or use $_.Name to reference the property of your object: $documents.($_.Name). But I would rather go for the solutions of briantist and Kolob Canyon. Apr 28, 2020 at 8:32
4

I use the following command to enumerate the properties and put them in a table:

$Object.PSObject.Properties | Format-Table @{ Label = 'Type'; Expression = { "[$($($_.TypeNameOfValue).Split('.')[-1])]" } }, Name, Value -AutoSize -Wrap

I wrote the following function around this, that iterates through nested properties as well.

function Enumerate-ObjectProperties {
    param (
        [psobject] $Object,
        [string] $Root
    )

    Write-Output $($Object.PSObject.Properties | Format-Table @{ Label = 'Type'; Expression = { "[$($($_.TypeNameOfValue).Split('.')[-1])]" } }, Name, Value -AutoSize -Wrap | Out-String)

    foreach ($Property in $Object.PSObject.Properties) {
        # Strings always have a single property "Length". Do not enumerate this.
        if (($Property.TypeNameOfValue -ne 'System.String') -and ($($Object.$($Property.Name).PSObject.Properties))) {
            $NewRoot = $($($Root + '.' + $($Property.Name)).Trim('.'))
            Write-Output "Property: $($NewRoot)"
            Enumerate-ObjectProperties -Object $($Object.$($Property.Name)) -Root $NewRoot
        }
    }
}

Enumerate-ObjectProperties $YourObject

However please do keep in mind that some object are constructed somewhat typical, in the sense that they have 'loops' in their nesting. Subproperties that refer to parent objects. An example being:

Get-Date 'somebogusdata'
Enumerate-ObjectProperties $Error[0]

This will create a loop. You could of course add a 'depth' parameter to add a depth counter, specifying you only want to go to a certain depth. That would look something like this:

$script:Level = 1
function Enumerate-ObjectProperties {
    param (
        [psobject] $Object,
        [int32] $Depth = 1,
        [string] $Root
    )

    Write-Output $($Object.PSObject.Properties | Format-Table @{ Label = 'Type'; Expression = { "[$($($_.TypeNameOfValue).Split('.')[-1])]" } }, Name, Value -AutoSize -Wrap | Out-String)

    foreach ($Property in $Object.PSObject.Properties) {
        # Strings always have a single property "Length". Do not enumerate this.
        if (($Property.TypeNameOfValue -ne 'System.String') -and ($($Object.$($Property.Name).PSObject.Properties)) -and ($Level -le $Depth)) {
            $NewRoot = $($($Root + '.' + $($Property.Name)).Trim('.'))
            $Level++
            Write-Output "Property: $($NewRoot) (Level: $Level)"
            Enumerate-ObjectProperties -Object $($Object.$($Property.Name)) -Root $NewRoot
            $Level--
        }
    }
}

Enumerate-ObjectProperties -Object $Error[0] -Depth 2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.