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I need to maintain some data internally in my go code: an ID nested multiple levels deep, which is to be accessed when the names of the parent props are provided. If writing in JavaScript for example, I'd do something like:

var data = {
    1111: {
        la1: {
            lb1: 1343584765,
            lb2: 1545438458
        },
        la2: {
            lb1: 1263268535,
            lb2: 1468904679
        }
    },
    2222: {
        la1: {
            lb1: 1645078365,
            lb2: 1457732458
        },
        la2: {
            lb1: 1682974682,
            lb2: 1782975685
        }
    }
}

and then access like this (yes the top prop needs to be an int):

data[1111]['la1']['la2'] //gets 1343584765

but I can't see how to build this structure with Go structs, and most things I read advise against doing it that way. The only other way I can see is to use this logic in Go, but it feels messy and this may get bigger and therefore hard to maintain:

func getVal(
    varA int,
    varB string,
    varC string,
) int {
    if varA == 1111 {
        if varB == "la1" {
            if varC == "lb1" {
                return 1343584765
            }
            if varC == "lb2" {
                return 1545438458
            }
        }
        if varB == "la2" {
            if varC == "lb1" {
                return 1263268535
            }
            if varC == "lb2" {
                return 1468904679
            }
        }
    }
    if varA == 2222 {
    ....etc

and then access with:

getVal(1111, "la1", "lb1") //gets 1343584765

Big thanks to anyone who can help me out a bit!

  • what's your Go datastructure look like? – Nathan Cooper Jun 8 '16 at 10:04
  • Also, is 1111, la1, lb1 etc meanful hardcoded properties. Or are you thinking more like (pseudo-code) Map (int, Map(string, Map(string, int) ). Odd structure, maybe share with us what you intend to acheive. – Nathan Cooper Jun 8 '16 at 10:16
  • @NathanCooper That's basically my question. What Go datastructure would I use to replace the Go 'if' logic i'm using in 'getVal'? – tripRev Jun 8 '16 at 10:16
  • I'm assuming you santisied the property name in some way? Given that la1, lb1 etc I'm going to take it that these are fairly consistant meanful properties. Where "1111" looks like a Key in a Map/Dictionary, la1 looks more like "Wheel" on a car. Is that correct? – Nathan Cooper Jun 8 '16 at 10:30
  • @NathanCooper what I'm trying to achieve is maintain a list of unique ids, which need to be accessed based on provided vars varA, varB, varC - I will be given those and need to return the unique id based on the specific combination. Sorry if that's a silly way to explain it! – tripRev Jun 8 '16 at 10:32
3

Your way of approaching the problem is very peculiar. Maybe you already know this but on the off-chance you don't: use maps.

I made an example with badly-named types (since I don't know your use-case) and I also made everything a string to keep it simple.

type l3Map map[string]string
type l2Map map[string]l3Map
type l1Map map[string]l2Map

func main() {

    data := l1Map{
        "1111": l2Map{
            "la1": l3Map{
                "lb1": "1343584765",
                "lb2": "1545438458",
            },
        },
    }

    fmt.Printf("%v\n", data["1111"]["la1"]["lb2"])
}

https://play.golang.org/p/daKjDbX8Ao

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