13

I have created generic interface that suppose to map entities to view models and backwards. I have to make around 80 registrations in autofac configuration. Is it possible to register them as batch? Here is the interface:

public interface ICommonMapper<TEntity, TModel, TKey>
    where TEntity : BaseEntity<TKey>
    where TModel : BaseEntityViewModel<TKey>
    where TKey : struct 
{
    TModel MapEntityToModel(TEntity entity);
    TModel MapEntityToModel(TEntity entity, TModel model);
    TEntity MapModelToEntity(TModel model);
    TEntity MapModelToEntity(TModel model, TEntity entity);
}

Thanks!

  • 2
    you have 80 implementation of ICommonMapper ? – Cyril Durand Jun 8 '16 at 16:23
  • Around 80. 117 entity types... and around 80 of them are CRUDable – Roman Jun 8 '16 at 19:26
27

You could use :

builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(assemblies)
       .AsClosedTypesOf(typeof(ICommonMapper<,,>));

Where assemblies is a collection of the assemblies where your types belong.

if you have a PersonMapper that inherits from ICommonMapper<Person, PersonModel, Int32>, Autofac will be able to resolve ICommonMapper<Person, PersonModel, Int32>

  • had to provide builder with IAssemblyFinder... worked. – Roman Jun 8 '16 at 19:50
6

Don't need to make it complicated, you just simply need to register all the implementations of an interface as normal like below:

enter image description here

Then Autofac will automatically inject the implementations of that interface when it see the enumerable/array of the interface in a constructors like this. enter image description here

I used this method and it works perfectly as I expect. Hope it helps. Cheers

  • 1
    There's a memory leak in that code as you capture a reference to an IEnumerator<T> but don't dispose of it - I assume you don't since your class doesn't implement IDisposable. Would you care explaining why you chose to go this way and not keep an IEnumerable<T> field? – Mickaël Derriey Feb 3 '17 at 5:02
  • Hi Mick, Thanks for your comment, I agree we need to dispose those instances, but it wasn't the focus of my answer here. I just wanted to give you guys an example of how to inject array of implementations of a particular interface into a specific instance using Autofac. For not keeping an IEnumerable<T> field because I just want to inject implementations of ICommandChainFeature into my CommandChain class :) – Hung Vu Feb 3 '17 at 5:55
  • 1
    I get that, but why not have private readonly IEnumerable<ICommandChainFeature> _features; instead of the IEnumerator<ICommandChainFeature>? – Mickaël Derriey Feb 3 '17 at 6:00
  • I used IEnumerable because I want to use foreach loop when needed, this is a very basic knowledge. You can use List<T>, array of T, or whatever kind of list/array, Autofac would do the same thing for you. Hope it helps...If you find my answer helpful, you can give an upvote. Thanks – Hung Vu Feb 3 '17 at 6:03
  • 1
    Nevermind. Your field is an enumerator, not an enumerable. My question is not related to the OP's question, so I'll stop here. Sorry for going off-topic, I was just curious. – Mickaël Derriey Feb 3 '17 at 10:33
0

Here is another way to do that but with help of typeFinder:

var mappers = typeFinder.FindClassesOfType(typeof(ICommonMapper<,,>)).ToList();
        foreach (var mapper in mappers)
        {
            builder.RegisterType(mapper)
                .As(mapper.FindInterfaces((type, criteria) =>
                {
                    var isMatch = type.IsGenericType &&
                                  ((Type)criteria).IsAssignableFrom(type.GetGenericTypeDefinition());
                    return isMatch;
                }, typeof(ICommonMapper<,,>)))
                .InstancePerLifetimeScope();
        }
-1

you can tell autofac to register everything which implements an interface. I had to load a lot of things from several dlls so I did something like this, you should be able to adjust that to your own needs :

here's an example, you should be able to adjust that to your own needs :

foreach (var assembly in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies())
            {
                if (assembly.FullName.Contains("someNameYouCareAbout"))
                {
                    builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(assembly)
                   .AsImplementedInterfaces();
                }
            }

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